Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

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TheresaB
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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby TheresaB » Wed Mar 16, 2016 11:12 am

I took screen shots and notes.
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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Lucy5 » Wed Mar 16, 2016 12:47 pm

Speaking of chronic inflammation, this is a marker I'm trying to impact and struggling with, as is my functional Dr. My hsCRP typically is in the 3.2-4.2mg/L range. My best test ever was 12/15 when it dropped to 2.4- but I really don't know if it was supplement driven or diet driven.

I don't see lots of folks discussing their hsCRP results here - and when I do, often the numbers are impressive at <1.0. So, 2 questions if anyone would like to comment: Are homozygotes more likely to have higher chronic inflammation than heterozygotes? And is there another more specific test for inflammation in E4 carriers than hsCRP?

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Starfish77 » Wed Mar 16, 2016 3:12 pm

TheresaB,
Thank you so much for the screen shots. I do so much better with reading than listening. I got so much out of your screen
shots. Dr. Bresdesen did such an amazing job explaining such a complicated subject in a way that could be understood at some level by all of us.
Starfish

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Stavia » Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:55 pm

TheresaB wrote:I took screen shots and notes.


Theresa, Thank you SO much. Its a very complicated subject and a huge amount of information. You are a darling to share your efforts :)

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Tincup » Wed Mar 16, 2016 7:14 pm

Theresa, excellent and detailed summary!
Last edited by Tincup on Wed Mar 16, 2016 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Julie G
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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Julie G » Wed Mar 16, 2016 7:30 pm

Huge thanks, Theresa!!! That was an enormous amount of work :shock:. I'm supposed to get the full slides plus an extended 30 minutes interview conducted by Dr. Hyman within the next few days. I'll share with all when I do.

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Lucy5 » Wed Mar 16, 2016 10:01 pm

Wow. Thank you so, so much Theresa!! I just went thru the slides w/your notes and found that I had missed some important information the first go-round!

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby TheBrain » Thu Mar 17, 2016 9:46 am

Theresa, thank you, thank you, thank you! Excellent summary. You captured it all.

I learn something every time I listen to Dr. Bredesen speak. He gives me so much hope. The only issue I have is when he says that Apoe4 homozygotes have a 90 percent chance of getting Alzheimer's.

I recently spoke with Doris Zallen and she told me that the risk figure is 40-55 percent for homozygotes by age 85, according to the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative (API) of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix, AZ.

Doris is the professor in the Department of Science and Technology in Society at Virginia Tech who is conducting the study called “Genetic Testing for Common Disorders: Learning from the Experiences of Individuals who were Tested to Determine their Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease.”

I would like to follow up with Dr. Bredesen and ask him where his 90 percent figure comes from. Maybe it would be 90 percent if homozygotes never died of anything else and lived to 120 years of age? Of course, he intends for any risk figure to decrease for homozygotes and heterozygotes alike as a result of his pioneering work.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby Stavia » Thu Mar 17, 2016 11:11 am

Alysson the answer is nobody really knows. Different studies have shown different percentages because of course the groups are heterogeneous. The risk has to be higher in an obese sedentary person eating the SAD as opposed to one of us. The second neurologist I saw who works in the field said that everyone with apoe4 will eventually get it if they live long enough and she feels the aim is to push the onset out far enough so we die of something else first.

For instance my mum (at least one 4) was very frail, ate shockingly, was physically very lazy, had significant inflammation from severe ulcerative colitis for 40 years and also renal failure for 10 years and eventually died of her renal failure at almost 90 at which stage the cognition had been an issue for only 6 months. I think that's pretty damn good.

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Re: Dr Bredesen at Cleveland Clinic

Postby TheBrain » Thu Mar 17, 2016 11:21 am

Thanks, Stavia. It helps to have that context. And I have to agree that your mum did pretty damn good.

Every time I hear that 90 percent risk figure for homozygotes a lightning bolt of terror runs through my being. I'll remind myself of your reply whenever I come across that figure. I'm sure I'll hear it and see it again and again.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!


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