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Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:40 am
by PRESCOTT

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:51 am
by Tincup
As I don't have NYT subscription so I could not read, but managed to click on one of the study links before the paywall came up.

Methods
We linked data from the prospective Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) done in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway with dementia data from the Health and Memory Study and cause of death registries (n=30 375). Included participants were apparently healthy individuals for whom data were available on estimated cardiorespiratory fitness and important confounding factors. Datasets were matched to each participant through their 11-digit personal identification number. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated on two occasions 10 years apart, during HUNT1 (1984–86) and HUNT2 (1995–97). HUNT2 was used as the baseline for follow-up. Participants were classified into two sex-specific estimated cardiorespiratory fitness groups according to their age (10-year categories): unfit (least fit 20% of participants) and fit (most fit 80% of participants). To assess the association between change in estimated cardiorespiratory fitness and dementia, we used four categories of change: unfit at both HUNT1 and HUNT2, unfit at HUNT1 and fit at HUNT2, fit at HUNT1 and unfit at HUNT2, fit at both HUNT1 and HUNT2. Using Cox proportional hazard analyses, we estimated adjusted hazard ratios (AHR) for dementia incidence and mortality related to temporal changes in estimated cardiorespiratory fitness.

Findings
During a median follow-up of 19·6 years for mortality, and 7·6 years for incidence, there were 814 dementia-related deaths, and 320 incident dementia cases. Compared with participants who were unfit at both assessments, participants who sustained high estimated cardiorespiratory fitness had a reduced risk of incident dementia (AHR 0·60, 95% CI 0·36–0·99) and a reduced risk of dementia mortality (0·56, 0·43–0·75). Participants who had an increased estimated cardiorespiratory fitness over time had a reduced risk of incident dementia (AHR 0·52, 95% CI 0·30–0·90) and dementia mortality (0·72, 0·52–0·99) when compared with those who remained unfit at both assessments. Each metabolic equivalent of task increase in estimated cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with a risk reduction of incident dementia (adjusted HR 0·84, 95% CI 0·75–0·93) and dementia mortality (0·90, 0·84–0·97). Participants who increased their estimated cardiorespiratory fitness over time gained 2·2 (95% CI 1·0–3·5) dementia-free years, and 2·7 (0·4–5·8) years of life when compared with those who remained unfit at both assessments.


My take away is that improving cardiorespiratory fitness gave a similar associational benefit as being continually fit.

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 7:04 am
by Fiver
It's so nice to see the Hazard Ratios going in the "good" direction. Thanks for sharing. Off to the gym.

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:47 pm
by circular
Tincup wrote:As I don't have NYT subscription so I could not read ...

Just FYI you can have a free registration with NYT that allows limited article viewing per month. I think it used to be 10 but may now be 3.

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:42 pm
by mike
From the actual article in clearer English..

They found that it did. People who were fit throughout the study period proved to be almost 50 percent less likely to develop dementia than the least-fit men and women. Perhaps more encouraging, those men and women who had entered middle age out of shape but then gained fitness showed the same substantial reduction in their subsequent risk for dementia.

They turn things around in middle age, which is when neuron loss often starts in future AD sufferers, so this would make sense. We need to target folks decades before symptoms start..

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:46 pm
by PeteWilliams
Measuring CV fitness does not need to be difficult, it easy to do for us all.

We actually measure it in our consulting room with a step and iPhone app. May not be 100% accurate to a lab ands analysis but who is going to spend £500 getting that done.
CV fitness can also be measured in the field with different testing methods such as 1.5 mile Cooper test.

Exercise really is the poly pill, do it daily, get a bit of a sweat on (not tooooo much) and your brain will benefit, as will everything else.

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:47 pm
by PeteWilliams
prescott thanks for the share..

Re: Fitness and Dementia Study

Posted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:00 am
by DebbieG
PeteWilliams wrote:Measuring CV fitness does not need to be difficult, it easy to do for us all.

We actually measure it in our consulting room with a step and iPhone app. May not be 100% accurate to a lab ands analysis but who is going to spend £500 getting that done.
CV fitness can also be measured in the field with different testing methods such as 1.5 mile Cooper test.

Exercise really is the poly pill, do it daily, get a bit of a sweat on (not tooooo much) and your brain will benefit, as will everything else.


Hi PeteWilliams,

What iPhone app do you use to measure CV fitness?

Debbie