A common antibiotic may help reverse one aspect of aging

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
User avatar
Julie G
Mod
Mod
Posts: 7748
Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:36 pm

A common antibiotic may help reverse one aspect of aging

Postby Julie G » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:22 am

This is promising! Cellular senescence occurs when normal cells fail to divide. Despite no longer dividing, they remain metabolically active and tend to take on a pro-inflammatory phenotype contributing to aging. As we age, our brain cells also display senescent-like changes and accumulate. Work with mice has shown that drugs targeted at senescent cells prevents tau build-up, protecting neurons. Scientists in England have found that a common antibiotic, azithromycon, can effectively target and eliminate senescent cells in culture. At a single low-dosage, Azithromycin was shown to effectively kill and eliminate the senescent cells, with an efficiency of 97 percent. Moreover, the normal healthy cells thrived in the presence of Azithromycin.

Here’s the press release: Antibiotics eliminate senescent cells associated with ageing

Here’s the paper: Azithromycin and Roxithromycin define a new family of “senolytic” drugs that target senescent human fibroblasts

circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 4504
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Re: A common antibiotic may help reverse one aspect of aging

Postby circular » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:41 am

:D I'd be afraid of the antibiotic having adverse consequences via the microbiome, so I wonder how well results will hold up in animals first, then humans, over years. I'm expecting that over time we'll begin hearing more about a brain microbiome. If bad players can go from the sinuses into the brain so can the good ones? Maybe in the year 2000 the abx will be administered with a probiotic cocktail through nasal inhalation and treat both problems :D
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


Return to “Science and Research”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: mwhr and 4 guests