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Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
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Juliegee
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Re: Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Postby Juliegee » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:51 pm

Mast cells are big players in inflammation. With your terrific response to ketotifen, my guess is that your inflammatory markers will be much improved :D

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Stavia
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Postby Stavia » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:56 pm

Circ honey I wish I had your apob. Mine is 107.
A hs-CRP shouldn't be too expensive and its pretty accurate. Maybe get the mast cell thingy down and just check that.
If your diet hasnt deteriorated there's no reason IMO to keep checking your 0mega ratios.
BTW George emailed me a very intriguing take on niacin/vit C and histamine. It may help you.
I will copy and paste and PM you.
Does anyone else want to know?

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Re: Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Postby LAC1965 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:13 pm

I would be interested. I have mast cell activation disorder and my histamine level is chronically high. Despite evidence of systemic inflammation (gastro), my crp is low. Odd.

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Re: Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Postby SusanJ » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:28 pm

I'd be interested. Histamine is still one of those things I'm trying to understand/control better.

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Stavia
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Re: Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Postby Stavia » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:41 pm

This is from George:
Should we stat a new thread?

While he was working at Henry Wellcome Laboratories, Nobel Laureate Sir Henry Dale discovered that histamine was released during anaphylaxis, a lifethreatening allergic reaction. This is a very complex, severe reaction, and apparently acetyl choline and heparin are also involved. Guinea pigs are very sensitive to anaphylactic shock. Boyle found that if guinea pigs were pretreated for a week with niacin, they did not die after a second dose of protein— a procedure that killed all the animals not pretreated. I have used this technique to protect patients against anaphylactic shock. In 1996 I saw a man who was very fearful for his life. He was peanut sensitive and avoided all traces of peanuts, but over a six-month period he had five major reactions and nearly died from the last one. I advised him to start with ascorbic acid, 1 gram taken after each of three meals. Ascorbic acid destroys histamine, which is why scorbutic patients who are deficient in this vitamin have high blood histamine levels. I wanted to build up his blood ascorbic acid levels. After one week he was to take 100 mg of niacin three times daily after meals. This was designed to release a small amount of histamine with a gentle flush. My hypothesis was that the histamine would be destroyed by the ascorbic acid and would therefore be neutralized to a degree. The niacin dose was increased to 250 mg twice a day . This was his maintenance dose. He came back ten years later for an unrelated problem. He had not taken any niacin the previous two years after his doctor told him to stop. (This is an example of a totally illogical fear of niacin when the same doctor would, with no hesitation, prescribe any and all of the toxic drugs that are available.) I advised him to resume the niacin and to increase the dose until he was on 1 gram after each of three meals. He had no more reactions. I had advised him to be as careful as before. I have also used the combination of niacin and ascorbic acid to protect patients against the hives induced by insect bites. And I found it very helpful in decreasing the intensity of the allergic reactions, no matter what type of substance the patient is reacting to, although it will not completely prevent these reactions.

Hoffer, Abram; Andrew W. Saul; Harold D. Foster (2012-02-01). Niacin: The Real Story (Kindle Locations 815-830). Basic Health Publications, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

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Re: Perturbed Fatty Acid Metabolism in E4 carriers

Postby Stavia » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:45 pm

okies found this thread for our histamine discussion
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=918&p=14316#p14316


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