New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
User avatar
Julie G
Mod
Mod
Posts: 8660
Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:36 pm

New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby Julie G » Fri May 15, 2015 5:26 pm

This section is reserved for any guest researchers or clinicians who focus on APOE-ε4 related pathologies. Please feel free to pop in with comments or provide research updates at any time. If you'd like to arrange a formal Q & A session, please contact either juliegee@apoe4.info or chriswoods@apoe4.info.

wbgrant
New User
New User
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:58 pm
Location: San Francisco
Contact:

Re: New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby wbgrant » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:40 pm

Greetings.
I do multi-country ecological studies of diet and disease. My first topic was diet and Alzheimer's disease, and I have worked on that topic on and off for 20 years. Here is my most recent paper. Countries with the highest meat as well as eggs, cheese, and some fish have the highest rates of Alzheimer's disease: Brazil, Mongolia, and the U.S. Countries with the lowest amounts and generally with a plant-based diet have the lowest rates. The mechanisms seem to relate to cholesterol and trace minerals. Cholesterol is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, and one of the functions of ApoE4 is to have the liver produce more cholesterol; another function is to have the pancreas produce more insulin. Together, they help hunter gatherers survive from one feast to the next. Dietary intake of metals such as aluminum and the transition metals such as copper, iron, manganese, and zinc is higher for animal-based diets than plant-based diets, which are higher in beneficial metals, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Aluminum and transition metals generate free radicals, which can destroy neurons, thus contribute to the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, people in countries with the highest ApoE4 prevalence generally do not have high rates of Alzheimer's because they eat little. However, when some, such as those of African descent, live in the U.S., where food is very abundant, they develop high rates of Alzheimer's disease.

Below is the abstract of my latest paper. I have several more listed at pubmed.gov

I would be happy to answer questions and discuss this topic in greater detail.

J Am Coll Nutr. 2016 Jul;35(5):476-89. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2016.1161566.
Using Multicountry Ecological and Observational Studies to Determine Dietary Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10. ... 16.1161566
Grant WB1.
Author information
Abstract
Rates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet. For example, when Japan made the nutrition transition from the traditional Japanese diet to the Western diet, AD rates rose from 1% in 1985 to 7% in 2008. Foods protective against AD include fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish, whereas risk factors include meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products. The evidence comes from ecological and observational studies as well as investigations of the mechanisms whereby dietary factors affect risk. The mechanisms linking dietary risk factors to AD are fairly well known and include increased oxidative stress from metal ions such as copper as well as from advanced glycation end products associated with high-temperature cooking, increased homocysteine concentrations, and cholesterol and its effects on amyloid beta, insulin resistance, and obesity. Lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations also are associated with increased risk of AD. In addition to reviewing the journal literature, a new ecological study was conducted using AD prevalence from 10 countries (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, India, Mongolia, Nigeria, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and the United States) along with dietary supply data 5, 10, and 15 years before the prevalence data. Dietary supply of meat or animal products less milk 5 years before AD prevalence had the highest correlations with AD prevalence in this study. Thus, reducing meat consumption could significantly reduce the risk of AD as well as of several cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, stroke, and, likely, chronic kidney disease.
TEACHING POINTS:
• Single-country ecological data can be used to find links between diet and AD because the national diet changes, such as during the nutrition transition to a Western diet. • Multicountry ecological studies can be used to find links between dietary factors and risk of AD. • Prospective observational studies are useful in linking dietary components and patterns to risk of AD. • The most important dietary link to AD appears to be meat consumption, with eggs and high-fat dairy also contributing. • Diets high in grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish are associated with reduced risk of AD, but these factors cannot counter the effects of meat, eggs, and high-fat dairy. • Higher vitamin D status is associated with reduced risk of AD.

User avatar
Stavia
Mod
Mod
Posts: 5265
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:47 pm
Location: Middle Earth

Re: New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby Stavia » Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:44 pm

thank you Dr Grant for popping in to share your research.
We welcome discussion of all kinds.

I see that your primary field and your PhD is in physics. What brought you to biochemistry?
Was it your interest in Vitamin D from sunlight? I personally agree, as do many experts in the field, that this is a critical aspect in many chronic diseases.

What do you postulate as a mechanism of meat being a risk factor for AD? Of course we always, as a group, question links between correlation and causation and dietary analyses are notoriously difficult to accurately factor in other variables of each society studied.



Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

User avatar
Julie G
Mod
Mod
Posts: 8660
Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby Julie G » Wed Nov 22, 2017 12:09 pm

Welcome, Dr. Grant! We're delighted to have you join the discussion. I was able to find full text of your paper on SciHub for anyone who lives in a jurisdiction where that's legal. BTW, Table 4 of the paper answers your question, Stavia.

I'm pressed for time and will have a few more questions later, but I was wondering if you find it ironic, Dr. Grant, that the very foods you're warning against are precisely the ones highest in Vitamin D and B12 necessary to reduce homocysteine? I've greatly minimized animal products from my diet and have found my homocysteine rising :?. I'm running an N=1 now to see if rigorous B12 (folate & B-6) supplementation will have an effect on bringing that down. FWIW, most of our members track and tweak both of those biomarkers precisely for the reasons you've outlined.

Also, I notice that your paper doesn't take the ApoE4 allele into consideration. Couldn't lower rates of AD in some geographic locations be due to lower prevalence of the gene? More later. Thanks for sharing your terrific paper. We need more deep dives into diet and Alzheimer's.

alangreenmd
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 62
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:32 pm

Re: New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby alangreenmd » Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:11 pm

Great paper by Dr Grant.

Will review his papers. Excellent contribution.
Also Dr Grant explained big mystery, why Africans in Africa with APOE4 have low rate AD.
Very encouraging for us who believe in diet he described.
Multi nation studies excellent source of understanding.

JulieAnnie
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:38 am

Re: New Discussion Category/Reserved for Guest Experts

Postby JulieAnnie » Wed Aug 22, 2018 7:22 pm

wbgrant wrote:I do multi-country ecological studies of diet and disease. My first topic was diet and Alzheimer's disease, and I have worked on that topic on and off for 20 years.


Hello Doctor Grant: Many thanks for participating and sharing your studies with us. I am wondering if you are aware of the Joslin Diabetes Center study of 25 and 50 year Type 1 medalists that also have Apoe4 allele. So far, they seem to be doing well cognitively although the oldest are late 50’s. What could possibly be protecting them from a lifetime of high glucose levels?


Return to “Science and Research”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 15 guests