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Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

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cdamaden
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Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby cdamaden » Mon Jan 02, 2017 11:18 am

This paper
http://www.jneurosci.org/content/36/37/9659
was mentioned in a NY Times article
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/31/opini ... ailed&_r=0
with the conclusion:
"Superagers are like Marines: They excel at pushing past the temporary unpleasantness of intense effort. Studies suggest that the result is a more youthful brain that helps maintain a sharper memory and a greater ability to pay attention.

This means that pleasant puzzles like Sudoku are not enough to provide the benefits of superaging. Neither are the popular diversions of various “brain game” websites. You must expend enough effort that you feel some “yuck.” Do it till it hurts, and then a bit more."

I didn't see any mention of APOE4 status among the superagers.
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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby marty » Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:11 am

Interesting.

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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby Starfish77 » Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:03 pm

Chris,
Thanks for the encouraging article for those of us who are "agers" and would love to work our way up to being "superagers".
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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby Julie G » Wed Jan 04, 2017 5:36 am

Starfish, those of us who've had the honor of spending time with you know you're already "super" :D. Your kind presence gives us all hope. XO

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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby Starfish77 » Wed Jan 04, 2017 12:03 pm

Julie,
Thanks for your kind thoughts. Keeping up with this group certainly is a mental workout. Besides getting to know the interesting members, researching the many topics discussed helps keep the dust out of our mental corners.
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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby circular » Sun Jan 08, 2017 8:10 pm

Many many moons ago I remember reading that stress has neurodegenerative effects in the e4 brain moreso than the e3 brain. I have often found the tipping point difficult to identify, but I do know that things like learning new languages or an instrument or some such thing that is out of context with your existing skills is the idea. Recently I've been trying to fit in short lessons in chemistry but really want to study it in a more concentrated way, along with languages. I feel a need to do mathematical calculations that are beyond my high school training. I never even took calculus. Yes, it will hurt, and math word problems will simply do me in. Maybe that should be my goal, to conquer those dreaded math word problems! Ouch!
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby marty » Mon Jan 09, 2017 10:40 am

So the idea may be to find something challenging and engaging without engendering fear of failure.

Learning a musical instrument is a possibility, especially if you don't mind never amounting to much with it.

Another approach I enjoy is watching lectures from The Great Courses.
http://www.thegreatcourses.com/

There is no attendence taken. There are no tests. But the lectures are not fluff. The quality and content are really good.

It may sound like a lot to pay $30-40 or more for a course, but they are usually 24 hours of lectures done by excellent teachers in half hour increments. Most courses include a small textbook.

The courses go on sale all of the time. Plus some can be purchased on Amazon, sometimes used.

I encourage everyone to at least look at the courses available. You are bound to find something you'd like.

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Re: RE: Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby Stavia » Mon Jan 09, 2017 4:48 pm

marty wrote:So the idea may be to find something challenging and engaging without engendering fear of failure.

Learning a musical instrument is a possibility, especially if you don't mind never amounting to much with it.

Another approach I enjoy is watching lectures from The Great Courses.
http://www.thegreatcourses.com/

There is no attendence taken. There are no tests. But the lectures are not fluff. The quality and content are really good.

It may sound like a lot to pay $30-40 or more for a course, but they are usually 24 hours of lectures done by excellent teachers in half hour increments. Most courses include a small textbook.

The courses go on sale all of the time. Plus some can be purchased on Amazon, sometimes used.

I encourage everyone to at least look at the courses available. You are bound to find something you'd like.

Marty we are kindred spirits!
1. My son and I have been doing the Great Courses for years. We have a huge collection. My favourite is the Robert Greenberg music series. His is the astrophysics. They are totally fabulous.
2. I started playing the piano from scratch 2 1/2 yrs ago. I am now grade 4-5 and wrestling with Prokofiev. I'm sure I play very badly but I believe a cognitively enhancing activity needs to be hard.

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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby marty » Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:17 pm

I have to agree with all you said, Stavia.

I have a collection of a few dozen courses. There hasn't been a disappointment yet.

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Re: Youthful Brains in Older Adults: Preserved Neuroanatomy in the Default Mode and Salience Networks...

Postby circular » Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:01 am

Thanks for mentioning these courses. I'd heard of them and promptly forgotten about them. I notice they're having a good sale right now.

I'll mention that my mother's neurologist, while I'm sure she'd support watching something educational that requires new thinking over sitting and watching endless sitcoms, made a point of explaining to my mother that she really needed to do something that involved learning and interacting with others, where she'd need to be socially engaged and respond to others input. She suggested something like a book group, but that's more than my mother can do. That may just be ideal because it weaves learning something new and challenging with social interaction. I didn't go into her suggestion with her. It might be interesting to form a local group around these courses, where they can be watched and then discussed with others?
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


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