FOXO3 Gene

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
NewRon
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby NewRon » Tue Sep 26, 2017 6:20 am

Julie G wrote:NewRon & pguyer, I'm beyond jelly :mrgreen:. Your work here is done. That's pretty close to a "get out of jail free" card. Congrats, my friends.


Ha, not so fast....

TOMM40 rs2075650 G:G

4 times higher Alzheimer's risk for me.

;)
Apo E4/E4, Male, Age 56

circular
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby circular » Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:17 am

Sandy57 wrote:Ya Julie, those darn G/G folks better take care of us when they turn 100 and you are 90 with just your one G allele and a fading 91% tile on your Brain IQ games. Lol haha.
Frank

:lol: I'm making a deposit at their facility, Evergreen Compassion, LLC :D
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

circular
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby circular » Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:28 am

SusanJ wrote:circ, it is likely context, and not just genetic, but maybe other assaults on our gut are setting the stage, like antibiotics, glyphosate, BPA and other toxins we have ingested in our lives and still can ingest unwittingly. What are those doing to our guts, microbiota and immune system?

I feel as though I'm in the second generation of a huge chemistry experiment. I see a potential connection between my dad's AD (he was a farmer and WW2 vet), and his use of DDT, aldrin, 2,4-D and other agricultural chemicals, not to mention the military's use of DDT and the like on mosquitos to prevent malaria. One of my brothers who used to farm is still in an Iowa State study tracking his biomarkers over a lifetime. Another brother gets ill around the chemicals that lawn services use, he suspects, because he was in Vietnam and around Agent Orange. And who knows about dicamba and the other chemicals used today.

I really hate being the canary in the coal mine, but I think that's where E4s are today. Maybe without the other assaults, we'd fare okay with lectins and other foods that have ended up on the problematic list.

I spoke with a friend yesterday who was just on a retreat in the mountains of Peru. She's been ketogenic for about three years, eats no grain, potatoes, etc ... She is a CIRS/biotoxin phenotype with a history of lyme, so very sensitive to things. She was really worried about what food would be available and how she would get by. She said she ended up eating more carbs in 12 days than in three years and had no reaction. She commented that the quinoa tasted completely different from even the best available in the US, and that they soak it 24 hours before cooking it. Now maybe her body has just healed enough to eat that way again, or maybe it was the immersion in a world that hasn't gone industrial and where people are happier and give more and are far more connected to the Earth. The lifestyle X factor where the whole is much greater than the sum of the parts.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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yikes0118
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby yikes0118 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:37 pm

Dang it....I'm T/T :-(

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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby Sandy57 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 12:51 am

Yikes you live on Oahu? Don't worry, if you are T/ T. The lead researcher himself, said lifestyle changes can improve your quality of life. I will be posting more on the weekend. In the meantime, exercise, eat sweet potatoes for your carb, and spend some time outside in the sun.
Epigenetics to reduce inflammation is what is important here.

Mahalo Frank

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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby Sandy57 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 12:52 am

Purple sweet potatoes, sorry.
F

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TheBrain
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby TheBrain » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:35 am

I'm G/T, but it doesn't seem to be helping me on the CHD front with my coronary calcium score of 365 last year. BUT... I can point to the hypoxia I suffered for 3+ years living at 9,100 ft altitude (which is similar to the problems that sleep apnea causes with respect to CHD).
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby Sandy57 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:44 pm

Alysson I agree altitude was not your friend. You have a G, but more importantly you constantly look for ways to improve your health, that is awesome. However, funny thing about the study, the Okinawaians, don't worry as much as we do. Even in Hawaii, which was part of the study, they just worry less about health and follow their program. But maybe that is because they have better health in general, so less to worry about. Keep up the good work and look into this a little. The main focus of these studies is how low their CVD is.

Aloha Frank

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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby circular » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:23 pm

alysson, it must be very frustrating to have your coronary calcium score be so high when you work so hard. Just as a thought, it would be intriguing to hear Dr. Gundry's perspective on your high score in context with your life history, genetics, lifestyle etc. Easier said than done, cost-wise, but he does do phone consults. Despite the limitations of his work, he is a very accomplished cardio-thoracic surgeon. Just wondered if you've considered that angle. I know you have a lot of irons in your fire though and we can only do so much.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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TheBrain
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Re: FOXO3 Gene

Postby TheBrain » Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:27 pm

Frank, thanks for your thoughts. I admit to being a worrier (I have two copies of the worrier gene), and I would definitely like to be more like the Okinawaians in that way at the very least! I eat small amounts of orange sweet potatoes. What makes the purple sweet potatoes better? I'll keep an open mind as to the other aspects of what the Okinawaians do. I know I feel better the more I move.

I suspect I got my one G from my mother. She was a heavy smoker and drinker. She also ate whatever she wanted. Her favorite restaurant meal was prime rib (and she'd eat all the fat!), and she loved donuts. She had peripheral artery disease, but doctors were shocked when they did a heart catheterization and found her coronary arteries to be completely clear of plaque. She died of emphysema at age 68, but it was surprising she lived that long, given her self-destructive lifestyle (and long history of debilitating mental illness).

Circular, yes, it is frustrating having such a high coronary calcium score. When I found that out, I was as shocked as when I learned I was homozygous for ApoE4. But there's a lot of heart disease in father's family, and my mother's father died of his second heart attack in his mid-sixties. So it's on both sides of my family.

I can't tell you how many times I've considered consulting with Dr. Gundry! He's so expensive now; I think I missed that boat. But at the Ancestral Health Symposium in Boulder last year, I did have the opportunity to speak with him for a few minutes. Wherever he was, he had a crowd of people around him, waiting their turn. I had my opportunity and asked him about my coronary calcium score, as I had just learned about it days before. He said those scores by themselves can be misleading. My score could have arisen from a past event that was no longer causing plaque buildup (that's why I keep pointing my finger at the hypoxia during sleep while living at high altitude). He said the only way to know what's going on in my coronary arteries is to do further testing. I believe he used the term angiogram, but I'm not sure. He showed me a video of someone's test in progress. He pointed to the calcium that was present, and its presence didn't disturb blood flow at all. He said this person was doing just fine.

Dr. Gundry didn't say anything about me doing a follow-up coronary calcium scan (and I neglected to ask him about that), though I do intend to do one at some point.

I've been wanting to go through all of the materials that tincup and his partner have so generously shared on this site, from all their consults with Dr. Gundry. I think that would be a good place for me to start, Gundry-wise.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!


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