tea for Apoe4

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alwayslearning
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tea for Apoe4

Postby alwayslearning » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:00 pm

Hello everyone,
I came across research from the National Univ. of Singapore and am attaching just one of the many articles published regarding tea drinking reducing the risk of Alzheimer's Disease by 86% in those of us who carry Apoe4.
http://www.medicaldaily.com/4-best-drin ... ine-415125
Apparently it has to be green, oolong, or black tea.

Signing off to make myself a cuppa tea!

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CarrieS
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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby CarrieS » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:37 pm

I'm currently drinking a mint blend tea. Dang.
Marmite for dementia prevention, hmmmm . . .
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Maryann
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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby Maryann » Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:57 pm

Thanks for sharing! I love easy to swallow advice!

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TheBrain
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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby TheBrain » Wed Feb 28, 2018 5:26 pm

I’m delighted to learn this good news. I’ve been a green tea drinker for decades.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby ncjlhp » Thu Mar 01, 2018 8:23 am

I hope this has some truth- love tea and champagne! But people in China drink tea constantly, with every meal, every day. Green, Black, Oolong. Been there a lot, in many Provinces, city and countryside: the same--- tea, tea, tea. Is their rate of Alzheimer lower than non tea drinking countries? That would give me pause. (I will try to find these statistics). China has other challenges, such as bad pollution and toxins everywhere so it could be hard to tell. Singapore, maybe not. Meanwhile, I will double the tea drinking at least!

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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby apod » Sun Mar 18, 2018 6:07 pm

What do you guys think about the new "purple teas" out of Kenya? The newest issue of LEF mentioned a strain of camellia sinensis that produces anthocyanins in the leaves. I've read these contain something like 3x the polyphenols of green tea (plus, a unique polyphenol, 1,2-di-galloyl-4,6-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-D-glucose -- GHG), while containing less caffeine. Reading about GHG, it's mentioned to enhance CPT1A, helping to convert fats into energy.

Being the sucker that I am for polyphenols and tea, I picked up a box. (Now, who's going to bring Purple Matcha to market?)

Purple Tea and Its Extract Suppress Diet-induced Fat Accumulation in Mice and Human Subjects by Inhibiting Fat Absorption and Enhancing Hepatic Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Expression: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4502735/

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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby NF52 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:15 am

apod wrote:What do you guys think about the new "purple teas" out of Kenya? The newest issue of LEF mentioned a strain of camellia sinensis that produces anthocyanins in the leaves.


This is one of those articles I'd really like to be significant--who couldn't get interested in purple tea?
Thanks for attaching the reference; I read through it, skipping most of the chemistry stuff, but noticed a couple of things:
The human "trial" was not real scientific, although they did have IRB approval:
As test subjects, 10 males [presumably all Japanese, since the authors are in Japan] aged 32 to 69 (averaged age: 47.1 years old) with mild obesity (BMI>24) were chosen. Exclusion criteria included: daily intake of purple tea; allergic reactions; and serious disorders such as diabetes, liver disorders, kidney disorders or cardiovascular disease.
Notice that obesity is Japan is defined as anything over BMI of 24.
There was no control group randomly assigned to drink something that looked like and tasted like purple tea--or even any kind of comparison tea! They were also not monitored or asked about physical activity during this period.
Here are the study's results. Changes noted are all in comparison to the average of these same 10 men before the study. So, for example, they lost an average of 0.9 kg (2 lbs) in 4 weeks, with a standard variation of 3.1 kg either way.
4-week daily consumption of purple tea drink in humans improved obesity parameters compared to baseline, including body weight (79.9 ± 3.1 kg vs 80.8 ± 3.2, p<0.05), body mass index (BMI) (26.8 ± 0.6 vs 27.0 ± 0.6, p<0.05) and body fat mass (21.0 ± 1.4 kg vs 21.8 ± 1.5, p<0.01).While there were no significant changes in blood parameters, HDL-cholesterol and HbA1c levels tended to be lower than those of before ingestion

Correlation does not = causation. To say the purple tea "improved" obesity parameters is unsupported.

The "good news": 10 guys in Japan who were few pounds overweight and who knew they were part of a study to see if purple tea resulted in weight loss--actually lost weight. Maybe they went to the gym more; maybe they changed their diets; maybe purple tea extracts should be on all our shopping lists. Unfortunately, this study from 2015 doesn't tell us.

And--it hasn't been cited by any other study, which I learned from a recent deep dive into how to read research articles is a good measure for the impact of a study. As an example, Bredesen's 2014 article Reversal of Cognitive Decline https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4221920/pdf/aging-06-707.pdf has been cited by 134 other peer-reviewed articles!
4/4 and still an optimist!

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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby apod » Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:52 am

NF52 wrote:The "good news": 10 guys in Japan who were few pounds overweight and who knew they were part of a study to see if purple tea resulted in weight loss--actually lost weight. Maybe they went to the gym more; maybe they changed their diets; maybe purple tea extracts should be on all our shopping lists. Unfortunately, this study from 2015 doesn't tell us.

I also came across these charts, which are encouraging, but they're not exactly from an unbiased source:

http://www.oryza.co.jp/html/english/pdf ... 01.0SJ.pdf

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 9.47.38 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 9.44.10 AM.png


There's surprisingly little information out there about GHG, compared with the volume of literature on EGCG -- I only see that one article on pubmed from 2015.
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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby Fiver » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:56 pm

Interesting. Thanks for sharing this! This is research from a company supporting their product - which doesn't mean it isn't correct, just not peer-reviewed university research. The methods they used are appropriate, common methods. They seem to know what they were doing. The purple coloration is from extra anthocyanin production. It's easy to trigger this in plants by UV light exposure, high light in general, or by providing low levels of nutrients to the plant. (When farmers fertilize crops, levels of these polyphenols generally decrease). The conditions they mentions imply high light levels and low use of fertilizers. These conditions up-regulate a particular metabolic pathway - plants do this to "use up" some of the excess sugars they make from high rates of photosynthesis and to have anthocyanins to act as a protective sunscreen. Some breeds of plants do this to a greater extent than others. So.....bingo: purple tea!

As mentioned, the sample sizes for the mouse studies and human studies are low-ish. They are simply small studies. But they seem to be basically sound.

Interesting that they show how storage of the tea matters - to maintain levels of phenolics in any type of tea keep out of the sunlight, keep cool, and use fresher leaves.

And FYI they are showing levels of polyphenols in the dry leaves here...not what ends up being in your cup, which would also depend on how many leaves you use and how you soak them.
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Re: tea for Apoe4

Postby shacherry » Mon Mar 19, 2018 7:25 pm

Do you think unsweetened black ice tea would work. I prefer my tea on ice than heated.
ApoE 3/4


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