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Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
J11
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby J11 » Sat Jan 26, 2019 4:48 pm


circular
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby circular » Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:28 pm

J11 wrote:circ, the people are here to help!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasma_gondii

Power to the people, and donations to Wikipedia!
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

J11
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby J11 » Sat Jan 26, 2019 7:16 pm

circ, you know, I don't think we pushed the AD research funding message enough.
When the AD community went to the government for funding, legislators probably said:

"Well, with cancer we declared war and funded it a billion a year, and after half a century and perhaps a half trillion dollars we aren't that much closer to the cure. We can't get in another unwinnable battle, so we're not even in for dollar 1 for Alzheimer's."

The problem with this thinking is that Alzheimer's is NOT cancer.
There is no identified resistance in AD.
Without a mechanism of resistance, illnesses should not be expected to be close to invincible.
In an illness such as Alzheimer's, one would expect that once any treatment effect could be shown, then it should be possible to amplify the effect. After an initial response, no resistance would occur, and thus an unopposed victory is not improbable.

If this line of thought proves true, then AD funding would be seen as one of the wisest investments of public dollars ever! At current funding levels there is almost 100 times greater treatment costs than research investment. If the existing research knowledge base were to be sufficient to push us over the top, then the investment returns for the research dollars would be enormous. If politicians begin to realize this is happening they might pile on more dollars because they would then be perceived as having solved the problem through their actions. It is possible that this reasoning is already driving AD budgets. Of course, the great part of all of this is that there would be an end point in which the budgets could be wound down. Greater than 100 to 1 return on investment over the short term! Not bad. Given this logic, the near term funding trend is up. The Yeas have it.

As the figure in the below url shows, we have only moved above $1 billion annual funding for the last 2 years and there are already
near term treatments with substantial potential: taurx, gum bacteria, Plasmapheresis, etc..

https://alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/res ... commitment

If AD can lead the way to demonstrate that illness can be a fiscally attractive government investment, then other non-resistant type illnesses could join the line for a similar funding round.

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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby Whatnow » Fri Feb 01, 2019 6:44 am

Reading Derek Lowe's recent article and associated comments about the failure in a phase III trial by Roche of yet another amyloid antibody gives me hope that there are an increasing number of researchers investigating other explanations than beta-amyloid as the root cause of alzheimers. The amount of resources poured in to that one theory without much in the way of positive results (except that we now know 10,000 ways not to make a lightbulb) is staggering. I wonder if they would be quite so dismissive of Bedersen's protocol if I asked them about it now.

On topic of periodontis/gingivitis, I though I'd mention that both my Wife and I (n=2) have seen dramatic reductions in plaque and gum irritation and bleeding after beginning to chew Xylitol gun every day. It has been shown to have an effect of bacteria (including P. gingivalis). Perhaps that would be a useful addition to oil pulling, flossing, and brushing, etc?

circular
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby circular » Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:26 pm

Whatnow wrote:(except that we now know 10,000 ways not to make a lightbulb)

LOL
Whatnow wrote:On topic of periodontis/gingivitis, I though I'd mention that both my Wife and I (n=2) have seen dramatic reductions in plaque and gum irritation and bleeding after beginning to chew Xylitol gun every day. It has been shown to have an effect of bacteria (including P. gingivalis). Perhaps that would be a useful addition to oil pulling, flossing, and brushing, etc?

Love these oh so simple ideas!
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

mike
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby mike » Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:27 pm

Whatnow wrote:On topic of periodontis/gingivitis, I though I'd mention that both my Wife and I (n=2) have seen dramatic reductions in plaque and gum irritation and bleeding after beginning to chew Xylitol gun every day. It has been shown to have an effect of bacteria (including P. gingivalis). Perhaps that would be a useful addition to oil pulling, flossing, and brushing, etc?

Just beware that Xylitol is extremely toxic to dogs - don't leave it lying around if you have them.
Sonoma Mike
4/4

Whatnow
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby Whatnow » Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:57 am

Yes, we have two dogs and are very aware of the danger Xylitol presents to canines. I've even heard of a suspected case of a dog being poisoned because they picked up some xylitol gum or candy remnants from off of the street. It's really astonishing that something so harmless to us should be so dangerous to our dogs. Of course, we are also careful with chocolate. Thanks for the warning, though, as I'm sure many people are not aware of the danger of xylitol for dogs.

ncjlhp
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Re: Periodontis bacteria linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Postby ncjlhp » Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:29 am

A good idea to brush, floss diligently and have your teeth cleaned regularly... prevention might be one of the keys!


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