Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 5145
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby circular » Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:18 am

through the spleen! Nothing on the brain, but heads up to autoimmune folks, and I'll bet this pathway could reduce inflammation in the brain???

Science direct article:

Drinking baking soda could be an inexpensive, safe way to combat autoimmune disease

Can't access the full paper:

Oral NaHCO3 Activates a Splenic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway: Evidence That Cholinergic Signals Are Transmitted via Mesothelial Cells
They have shown that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, it becomes a trigger for the stomach to make more acid to digest the next meal and for little-studied mesothelial cells sitting on the spleen to tell the fist-sized organ that there's no need to mount a protective immune response ...

The conversation, which occurs with the help of the chemical messenger acetylcholine, appears to promote a landscape that shifts against inflammation, they report ...

"We think the cholinergic (acetylcholine) signals that we know mediate this anti-inflammatory response aren't coming directly from the vagal nerve innervating the spleen, but from the mesothelial cells that form these connections to the spleen," O'Connor says.

In fact, when they cut the vagal nerve, a big cranial nerve that starts in the brain and reaches into the heart, lungs and gut to help control things like a constant heart rate and food digestion, it did not impact the mesothelial cells' neuron-like behavior. ...

"We think this helps explain the cholinergic (acetylcholine) anti-inflammatory response that people have been studying for a long time," O'Connor says.

Another reason to avoid anticholinergic medicines and be sure choline status is good.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

User avatar
SusanJ
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 2835
Joined: Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:33 am
Location: Central Florida

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby SusanJ » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:01 pm

I think I read this review when it came out last year. The whole acid in the stomach thing kicks off a lot of different digestive functions including bile release, which can help resolve SIBO problems. Studies show RA can be linked to GI problems, so it's another piece of the puzzle of how to tweak digestion.

circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 5145
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby circular » Thu Apr 18, 2019 9:32 pm

SusanJ wrote:I think I read this review when it came out last year. The whole acid in the stomach thing kicks off a lot of different digestive functions including bile release, which can help resolve SIBO problems. Studies show RA can be linked to GI problems, so it's another piece of the puzzle of how to tweak digestion.

At the same time I'm wondering whether it's wise to take baking soda if the blood isn't acidic. Might make it too alkaline? Paradoxically, 8-)
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

Veero
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:06 pm

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby Veero » Sat Apr 20, 2019 9:04 pm

Any idea whether calcium carbonate ( such as In Tums) would have a similar effect?

User avatar
SusanJ
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 2835
Joined: Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:33 am
Location: Central Florida

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby SusanJ » Sun Apr 21, 2019 6:18 am

Veero wrote:Any idea whether calcium carbonate ( such as In Tums) would have a similar effect?


My guess would be they would work if the effect in the study is due to a change in pH. You could also try contacting the researchers and ask them. Many are flattered that you take the time to ask questions and will respond with an answer.

circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 5145
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby circular » Sun Apr 21, 2019 8:36 am

Veero wrote:Any idea whether calcium carbonate ( such as In Tums) would have a similar effect?

I personally avoid Tums because it has aluminum in it. Likewise Gaviscon. You can get aluminum-free Gaviscon from Canada but its very expensive.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

Veero
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:06 pm

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby Veero » Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:12 am

The generic equivalent of Tums I am using doesn’t list aluminum in the ingredients but is it a contaminant?

circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 5145
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby circular » Mon Apr 22, 2019 9:26 am

Veero wrote:The generic equivalent of Tums I am using doesn’t list aluminum in the ingredients but is it a contaminant?

Not that I know of. I wonder if generics don’t have to list it or if it’s below a certain amount, or if your just doesn’t use it at all?
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

Berri
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 76
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:06 pm

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby Berri » Tue May 14, 2019 1:56 pm

[quote="circular"]through the spleen! Nothing on the brain, but heads up to autoimmune folks, and I'll bet this pathway could reduce inflammation in the brain???

Science direct article:

Drinking baking soda could be an inexpensive, safe way to combat autoimmune disease"

This is super interesting. Oddly enough, my nephew, the one others deride at times for his nutritional sermons, told me two years ago that I needed to take a teaspoon of soda in water every night! AND a tablespoon of EVOO. And now, my new dentist tells me I must brush my teeth with baking soda and his dental tech told me I had to use my Waterpik full of soda water to rinse after every brushing at least 3x/day. She showed me a photo she'd made of the saliva in my mouth -- FULL of very active little bugs, and that was after she'd been cleaning for 30 minutes. Words to the wise: "Use baking soda!"

circular
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 5145
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:43 am

Re: Interesting paper about baking soda stimulating antiinflammatory pathways ...

Postby circular » Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:18 pm

When I first posted this I wasn't able to pull up full text, but now I can:

Oral NaHCO3 Activates a Splenic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway: Evidence That Cholinergic Signals Are Transmitted via Mesothelial Cells

The human treatment group (only n=12 ;) ) used just 2 gms (about 1/4-1/2 tsp) of baking soda per 8.5 cups of water.

Human results:
To determine whether oral NaHCO3 had a similar anti-inflammatory action in humans as we found in rats, we evaluated blood samples at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 h following ingestion of a single dose (2 g) of NaHCO3 (n = 11) or equimolar NaCl (n = 6), each dissolved in 250 ml of bottled water. Pre- and posttreatment values of serum electrolytes are presented in Table III. There was a significant group by time interaction for changes in serum potassium (p = 0.029, η2P = 0.279). Specifically, serum potassium decreased with NaHCO3 treatment (p = 0.008), but there was no change with NaCl treatment (p = 0.381). BMI and C-reactive protein levels were not significantly different at baseline between either group, indicating a similar baseline inflammatory state (Table IV). No other significant differences were observed between TXT groups at baseline in any variables tested (Table IV)...

Baseline flow cytometry values of all subjects, before ingesting NaHCO3 or NaCl in solution, are presented in Table IV. Prior to any treatment, the percentages of blood leukocytes that were TNF-α+ neutrophils, M1 macrophages, or M2 macrophages were all significantly higher in the NaHCO3 TXT group when compared with baseline values obtained in the NaCl TXT group (Table IV). There was a significant TREATMENT × TIME effect on both M1 macrophages (p = 0.0004) and TNF-α–positive neutrophils (p = 0.0146), with the levels of these inflammatory cells in the plasma being reduced to a significantly greater degree following ingestion of NaHCO3 when compared with NaCl (Fig. 3). The greatest decreases in blood inflammatory cells were observed at 2 and 3 h following NaHCO3 ingestion. Similar to our observations in rats, oral NaHCO3 ingestion increased the percentage of blood leukocytes identified by flow cytometry as M2 macrophages (p = 0.00165) (Fig. 3). Decreases in inflammatory TNF-α+ neutrophils and M1 macrophages in the NaHCO3 TXT group did not appear to be related to the differing baseline levels observed between TXT groups. When comparing individual responses between subjects of different groups, subjects with similar baseline levels of blood leukocytes responded differently if they received NaHCO3 compared with NaCl (Supplemental Fig. 1)...

[Interstingly] the gastric proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole also inhibited the anti-inflammatory response to NaHCO3 (Fig. 6). [Emphasis added]

There's much more for a deep dive.

Of course the small study size is a problem, and if the greatest difference is 2 and 3 hours after ingestion, maybe hypothetically it would need to be taken every six hours or so.

Unfortunately they didn't track hs-CRP. Since the effect was so fast, I'm inclined to down some 2.5 hours before an hsCRP blood draw out of curiosity, but I'm not sure the if the mechanism targeted would impact hsCRP at all or as fast.

Playing in my sandbox ...
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


Return to “Science and Research”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests