ATN Biomarkers Have Prognostic Value in Alzheimer's

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cdamaden
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ATN Biomarkers Have Prognostic Value in Alzheimer's

Postby cdamaden » Sat Jun 29, 2019 8:38 am

-Amyloid, tau, and neurodegeneration biomarkers tied to improved prediction of memory decline

“Age (P < 0.001) and APOE ε4 status (P = 0.006) were significantly associated with faster rates of memory decline, while sex, education, and composite cardiovascular and metabolic condition score were not linked to memory decline in the clinical prediction model, Jack and co-authors reported.”

https://www.medpagetoday.org/neurology/ ... ve&vpass=1



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Re: ATN Biomarkers Have Prognostic Value in Alzheimer's

Postby NF52 » Sun Jun 30, 2019 1:39 pm

cdamaden wrote:-Amyloid, tau, and neurodegeneration biomarkers tied to improved prediction of memory decline

“Age (P < 0.001) and APOE ε4 status (P = 0.006) were significantly associated with faster rates of memory decline, while sex, education, and composite cardiovascular and metabolic condition score were not linked to memory decline in the clinical prediction model, Jack and co-authors reported.”

https://www.medpagetoday.org/neurology/ ... ve&vpass=1
Thanks for posting this, cdamaden. I noticed this also, right about the time I had a visit to my clinical trial site, where an updated consent form included a voluntary consent for an additional PET scan for tau (which I agreed to have). The study doctor, with whom I talked that day, recognizes that Alzheimer's is a complex, multi-factorial disease, with risk factors that can be mitigated through a variety of lifestyle strategies, long before signs of clinical or biomarker disease are evident. It appears that the article, with quotes below, is laying out a framework for clinical studies to test the hypothesis that while amyloid may be more evident in ApoE4+ brains, it is some combination of tau and other factors that tips the balance to disrupt cognitive performance. The Study Doctor (and others) talk of a day in the (hopefully) near future when genetic, family history, lifestyle, environmental and personal health history will be viewed using rich data on risk profiles to allow for more accurate and personalized risk assessments and targeted lifestyle and, as needed, monitoring and medical interventions starting while people are healthy.

Older individuals without baseline dementia were followed for an average of 4.8 years. Comparison of a novel prediction model that included amyloid PET, tau PET, and MRI cortical thickness with a model that incorporated more readily available clinical and genetic variables showed that the former system resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in predicting memory decline....The results may be most immediately relevant for use in clinical trials, allowing patients to be categorized into distinct prognostic groups, the editorialists added.
[Emphasis added.]
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cdamaden
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Re: ATN Biomarkers Have Prognostic Value in Alzheimer's

Postby cdamaden » Wed Jul 17, 2019 10:40 am

Predicting Alzheimer's
Blood markers close in on helping determine who will develop Alzheimer's disease
“LOS ANGELES -- Blood samples taken over several years from cognitively normal people predicted who would develop Alzheimer's disease with high discrimination accuracy and specificity about 4 years before symptoms emerged, researchers reported here.
In a large longitudinal study, diameters of neuronal-enriched extracellular vesicles (nEV) and nEV measures of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) were higher in preclinical samples of people who eventually developed Alzheimer's disease than in those who didn't, said Dimitrios Kapogiannis, MD, of the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore, at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) 2019. The research was published simultaneously in JAMA Neurology.”
https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcov ... DHE_Active



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