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Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
NewRon
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Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Postby NewRon » Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:01 pm

https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontol ... m=fulltext

From another forum;

All of the subjects were given a small LED torch that emits a deep red 670-nanometer beam, and were asked to look into it for three minutes a day across a two-week period. Follow-up testing revealed that the therapy had no impact on the younger subjects, but brought significant benefits for those 40 and over.

The ability to detect colors improved by as much as 20 percent in some of those subjects, with the most significant gains observed in the blue part of the spectrum that is most susceptible to age-related decline. Rod sensitivity was also significantly improved in those 40 and over, albeit not by quite as much.

"Our study shows that it is possible to significantly improve vision that has declined in aged individuals using simple brief exposures to light wavelengths that recharge the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery,” says Jeffery. ”The technology is simple and very safe, using a deep red light of a specific wavelength, that is absorbed by mitochondria in the retina that supply energy for cellular function. Our devices cost about £12 (US$14) to make, so the technology is highly accessible to members of the public."
Apo E4/E4, Male, Age 56

circular
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Re: Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Postby circular » Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 am

NewRon wrote:the most significant gains observed in the blue part of the spectrum that is most susceptible to age-related decline.

This must play a part in the circadian changes seen in aging, so I would think this therapy could have widespread systemic benefits in addition to vision improvements, assuming other lifestyle variables would also support healthy circadian rhythms.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

Aspenia 123
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Re: Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Postby Aspenia 123 » Mon Jul 13, 2020 7:20 pm

Does anyone have a link for the device he used? I was unable to open the paper and when I searched the internet I did not find a device meant to be looked at.

NF52
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Re: Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Postby NF52 » Wed Jul 15, 2020 12:29 pm

Aspenia 123 wrote:Does anyone have a link for the device he used? I was unable to open the paper and when I searched the internet I did not find a device meant to be looked at.
Hi Aspenia,
The original article is behind a paywall, but by Googling the primary author's name, I found this report on it from the helpful science journalists at Scitechdaily: Looking at Deep Red Light for Just Minutes a Day Significantly Improves Declining Eyesight
Here's a summary, which lacks the level of specific percentages of improvement that would bolster the claims of a study of only 24 healthy people with no eye disease:
For the study, 24 people (12 male, 12 female), aged between 28 and 72, who had no ocular disease, were recruited.Researchers found the 670nm light had no impact in younger individuals, but in those around 40 years and over, significant improvements were obtained.
Cone color contrast sensitivity (the ability to detect colors) improved by up to 20% in some people aged around 40 and over. Improvements were more significant in the blue part of the color spectrum that is more vulnerable in aging.
Rod sensitivity (the ability to see in low light) also improved significantly in those aged around 40 and over, though less than color contrast.
Professor Jeffery said: “Our study shows that it is possible to significantly improve vision that has declined in aged individuals using simple brief exposures to light wavelengths that recharge the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery.
Improvement "up to 20% in some people" might mean two people improved 20% and 5 improved 2% and they were all under the age of 50. Stating that rod sensitivity "improved significantly in those around age 40 and over" suggest that a group ages 38-50 showed a non-statistically significant improvement--otherwise they would have shared the percentage. In my view, the study does not "show" that it's possible to improve vision in aged individuals, since it's unclear how many of the 24 people were actually "aged". (40 no longer counts as aged in my book!)

Intriguing, yes! Ready for replication with a higher number of people ages 60+, who have documented vision loss: Definitely! The title of the article is misleading at best and seems like it could be dangerous if people start staring into an LED flashlight without guidance or monitoring.
4/4 and still an optimist!

NewRon
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Re: Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline

Postby NewRon » Thu Jul 16, 2020 8:35 am

Yes, definitely further studies needed and caution advised.

I recall Prof Michael Hamblin saying in a video interview somewhere, that he gazes into red light for a few minutes every morning, although I don’t recall the parameters he used.

I wonder if Prof Jeffery would respond to a query?
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