81 and still sane--I think!

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Arleeda
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81 and still sane--I think!

Postby Arleeda » Fri Nov 23, 2018 2:49 pm

Although neither of my parents had dementia, they may have died too early to tell. My dad had a fatal MI at 63, and my mom died of metastatic liver disease at 80. One of my maternal great-grandmothers did have dementia in her early 80s. I was a scientist (PhD in microbiology and immunology 1968) and did cancer research for 26 years and then worked in peer review administration for 15 years full time and then for another 15 years part-time, retiring last April at age 80. The computer software kept changing and I was having more difficulty learning new systems each year. My second husband had mild cognitive impairment from vascular dementia, and died of a stroke 5 years ago--I only hope I am so lucky. I had my DNA sequenced at 23andMe early on, and I do carry one copy of ApoE-4. My first husband has what my psych nurse daughter believes is Lewy Body Dementia, and he is in a nursing home. I moved back to the city where she and my son (he has family of wife and two daughters; she is single, no kids) live after my second husband died. I live in a penthouse in a high rise apartment building that caters to seniors, but I have no close friends here anymore. I have been traveling a lot, usually in small groups; I just returned from Central Mexico. I was the oldest person in the group, but I was able to keep up with the rest of them physically. ..I even climbed 240 steps of the Pyramid of the Moon! However, I was very afraid of getting lost and that probably motivated me a lot. I have exercised several times a week--aerobic and weight machines--since the mid 70s, so that may explain why I haven't been institutionalized yet! I just got Dr. Bredesen's book, it seems like the diets are very complicated, and living alone I don't have any incentive to cook much and usually buy frozen single meals. I developed microcolitis about three years ago and finally last summer discovered I was gluten sensitive, so I also try to eat gluten free. But giving up ice cream will be very hard, and I also like Irish potatoes! After reading Bredesen I decided to stop with the statins--although as I recall my cholesterol was over 300 without them. I quit blood pressure drugs after I lost 25 lbs (which returned my blood pressure to normal) during the initial stages of colitis and never regained it. I really want to die before I develop dementia but am afraid I won't.

Magda
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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby Magda » Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:19 pm

Arleeda wrote:Although neither of my parents had dementia, they may have died too early to tell. My dad had a fatal MI at 63, and my mom died of metastatic liver disease at 80. One of my maternal great-grandmothers did have dementia in her early 80s. I was a scientist (PhD in microbiology and immunology 1968) and did cancer research for 26 years and then worked in peer review administration for 15 years full time and then for another 15 years part-time, retiring last April at age 80. The computer software kept changing and I was having more difficulty learning new systems each year. My second husband had mild cognitive impairment from vascular dementia, and died of a stroke 5 years ago--I only hope I am so lucky. I had my DNA sequenced at 23andMe early on, and I do carry one copy of ApoE-4. My first husband has what my psych nurse daughter believes is Lewy Body Dementia, and he is in a nursing home. I moved back to the city where she and my son (he has family of wife and two daughters; she is single, no kids) live after my second husband died. I live in a penthouse in a high rise apartment building that caters to seniors, but I have no close friends here anymore. I have been traveling a lot, usually in small groups; I just returned from Central Mexico. I was the oldest person in the group, but I was able to keep up with the rest of them physically. ..I even climbed 240 steps of the Pyramid of the Moon! However, I was very afraid of getting lost and that probably motivated me a lot. I have exercised several times a week--aerobic and weight machines--since the mid 70s, so that may explain why I haven't been institutionalized yet! I just got Dr. Bredesen's book, it seems like the diets are very complicated, and living alone I don't have any incentive to cook much and usually buy frozen single meals. I developed microcolitis about three years ago and finally last summer discovered I was gluten sensitive, so I also try to eat gluten free. But giving up ice cream will be very hard, and I also like Irish potatoes! After reading Bredesen I decided to stop with the statins--although as I recall my cholesterol was over 300 without them. I quit blood pressure drugs after I lost 25 lbs (which returned my blood pressure to normal) during the initial stages of colitis and never regained it. I really want to die before I develop dementia but am afraid I won't.


Arleeda,
I am sending you warm welcome to our community! We are glad to have you here!
Thank you so much for sharing your story with us.
It sounds your have had and an amazing career in medical field and that you have been using your skills to learn as much as possible about preventing cognitive decline.
Adding movement to your life-style was definitely a great idea! I admire you for climbing Pyramid of the Moon, that's pretty impressive :D There are plenty proofs in the literature that movement has a lot of power in happy aging. Our PRIMER, lists it as a strategy number 2, among others: Please take a look if you have not found it yet:
viewtopic.php?f=33&t=1418
I completely understand Dr. Bredesen's Ketoflex 12/3 plan, might be at first overwhelming. Which part of the plan do you find most challenging? It sound you have already done some work and tried eliminating gluten containing grains. Is the dairy group the most challenging?
Dear Arleeda, you do not have to give up all the food you love at once. If you love potatoes (naturally gluten free) leave them in your diet, just eat less and simply watch your bodies respond to it. Small steps and setting little goals should help to take you where you would like to be.
Have you thought about using home meal delivery service? There are so many of them on the market. Some of them use only organic ingredients and cater to all sort of dietary restrictions. It looks like "SunBasket" uses premium ingredients as well as "GreenChef". If you like that, It could be one of avenues to explore...
https://try.sunbasket.com/your-kind-of- ... =affiliate
https://greenchef.com/home

One more thing, please consult with your doctor your decision on stopping statins and any other meditations. I think is good to have someone helping you to understand your bodies respond to changes.

Please keep on posting and feel free to ask us if any concerns arise.

My best,
Magda
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
IFM/Bredesen Trained, Reversing Cognitive Decline

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GLS18
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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby GLS18 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:30 am

Arleeda wrote:Although neither of my parents had dementia, they may have died too early to tell. My dad had a fatal MI at 63, and my mom died of metastatic liver disease at 80. One of my maternal great-grandmothers did have dementia in her early 80s. I was a scientist (PhD in microbiology and immunology 1968) and did cancer research for 26 years and then worked in peer review administration for 15 years full time and then for another 15 years part-time, retiring last April at age 80. The computer software kept changing and I was having more difficulty learning new systems each year. My second husband had mild cognitive impairment from vascular dementia, and died of a stroke 5 years ago--I only hope I am so lucky. I had my DNA sequenced at 23andMe early on, and I do carry one copy of ApoE-4. My first husband has what my psych nurse daughter believes is Lewy Body Dementia, and he is in a nursing home. I moved back to the city where she and my son (he has family of wife and two daughters; she is single, no kids) live after my second husband died. I live in a penthouse in a high rise apartment building that caters to seniors, but I have no close friends here anymore. I have been traveling a lot, usually in small groups; I just returned from Central Mexico. I was the oldest person in the group, but I was able to keep up with the rest of them physically. ..I even climbed 240 steps of the Pyramid of the Moon! However, I was very afraid of getting lost and that probably motivated me a lot. I have exercised several times a week--aerobic and weight machines--since the mid 70s, so that may explain why I haven't been institutionalized yet! I just got Dr. Bredesen's book, it seems like the diets are very complicated, and living alone I don't have any incentive to cook much and usually buy frozen single meals. I developed microcolitis about three years ago and finally last summer discovered I was gluten sensitive, so I also try to eat gluten free. But giving up ice cream will be very hard, and I also like Irish potatoes! After reading Bredesen I decided to stop with the statins--although as I recall my cholesterol was over 300 without them. I quit blood pressure drugs after I lost 25 lbs (which returned my blood pressure to normal) during the initial stages of colitis and never regained it. I really want to die before I develop dementia but am afraid I won't.


Hi Arleeda,

You are a remarkable woman! In addition to working until age 80, moving to a new city, recently hiking the Pyramid of the Moon and traveling the world, you continue to take steps to prevent cognitive decline. It takes a great deal of courage to share your story with us, face your challenges and change lifestyle factors, such as your diet. Magda provided great suggestions and feedback, including the possibility of a meal delivery service. I’m also curious as to whether your apartment building offers any group programs or classes. What are your thoughts on joining a cooking class where members cook for each other and celebrate meals together? What activities do you find most enriching? Perhaps you may meet new friends through a shared interest. Fostering a community, as we do here through the ApoE4.Info site, is an important way we can support our health goals.

As you move forward on your journey, please know that you are not alone. Your questions, insights and comments are always welcome here. What do you think about partnering with a practitioner familiar with the RECODE protocol and the Ketoflex food plan? I agree with Magda that consultation with a practitioner is critical regarding any changes to medications.

Warmest Wishes:)
Gina
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
Reversing Cognitive Decline For Coaches Certification Candidate, Fall 2018
"Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever." - Mahatma Gandhi

NF52
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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby NF52 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 6:20 pm

Arleeda wrote: I was a scientist (PhD in microbiology and immunology 1968) and did cancer research for 26 years and then worked in peer review administration for 15 years full time and then for another 15 years part-time, retiring last April at age 80... I had my DNA sequenced at 23andMe early on, and I do carry one copy of ApoE-4 ... I really want to die before I develop dementia but am afraid I won't.
Welcome Arleeda! You should have every reason to hope that you die of something other than dementia for several reasons:
* You have only one copy of ApoE 4. Below is a link to a comprehensive meta-analysis that found that people ages 60-75 with one copy of ApoE 4 had a probable risk of diagnosis of EITHER mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or any type of dementia by age 85 of only 20-25%. APOE-related risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia for prevention trials: An analysis of four cohorts

You are well past the period of highest incidence of diagnosis in women, according to one 2016 analysis:
APOE ɛ4 exerts its maximal effect on AD-risk by the early 70’s (100), with a reduction in risk after age 85 in both sexes
Age, APOE and Sex: Triad of Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Here's the same conclusion from a detailed study of over 5000 people in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Study (NCCS), of whom 190 were people with ApoE 3/4 ages 80 and older. They were followed for years to study conversion to MCI or AD. Here's the conclusion:
we observed that the relationship between APOE ε4 carrier status and allele dose appeared most robust in the age 70–80 group. ...HR [Hazard ratio] values started at approximately 1.4 at age 60 and increased until reaching a peak HR of about 1.8 centered between ages 70 and 75. After those ages, progression risk decreased with increasing age until it approached values similar to those seen at age 60. Consistent with recent evidence,one possible explanation for this finding is that APOE ε4 carriers who successfully pass through peak risk years possess “protective” genetic, lifestyle, or other factors that may delay progression to cognitive impairment.
Age, APOE and Sex: Triad of Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

So enjoy those trips to exciting places; there's lots of evidence that experiences and having purpose and an optimistic attitude towards aging delay the onset of MCI.https://news.yale.edu/2018/02/07/positive-attitudes-about-aging-reduce-risk-dementia-older-adults
4/4 and still an optimist!

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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby Starfish77 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 6:58 pm

Welcome Arleeda. It is great having another person sharing being eighty one with me. I have two copies of APOE4.
I also share your love of ice cream and Irish potatoes. I've done better giving up the ice cream than I have the potatoes.
It sounds as if you have had and are continuing to have a very interesting life. There are so many intersting things to do
I hope I can keep myself in good enough shape to continue doing them. Tomorrow I'm leaving for Florida to spend a week with the Haitian Art Society. It sounds as if you are already taking some very positive steps to keep you in the best
health possible for you. Keep up the good work. I'm so glad you are with us.

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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby SusanJ » Wed Nov 28, 2018 8:18 am

Starfish, you are my role model - the Art Society sounds fabulous! And Arleeda, just a big wow on the traveling.

How great to have you 2 fabulous women in the forum.

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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby thjj » Sat Dec 01, 2018 7:51 pm

I hope to be as enlightened and aware as you when I'm 81 :!:
· • Kim · • ·
ApoE4/4 status known: 2018 | Born: 1969 | Cognitive Impairment: none
Current condition: keto rash; ketone level: 1.0 mmol/L

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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby GLS18 » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:21 am

thjj wrote:I hope to be as enlightened and aware as you when I'm 81 :!:


Hi Kim and a warm welcome to our community!

I could not agree more:) It looks like you joined our site recently. Thanks for your comments and if you would like to share what led you here, we welcome you to post via Our Stories.

Looking forward to your continued contributions!
Gina
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
Reversing Cognitive Decline For Coaches Certification Candidate, Fall 2018
"Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever." - Mahatma Gandhi

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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby CoachJD » Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:58 am

thjj wrote:I hope to be as enlightened and aware as you when I'm 81 :!:


I want to second that welcome and encourage you to introduce yourself to the community by post your story! We want to know you and to learn how to support you on your journey to 81!
Joan Dickason, FMCHC
National Board Certified- Health and Wellness Coach
Reversing Cognitive Decline For Coaches, CertificationPending Fall 2018
"Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional " Haruki Muraka

thjj
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Re: 81 and still sane--I think!

Postby thjj » Tue Dec 11, 2018 9:58 pm

thjj wrote:I hope to be as enlightened and aware as you when I'm 81 :!:
That is if I'm lucky enough to make it to 81!
· • Kim · • ·
ApoE4/4 status known: 2018 | Born: 1969 | Cognitive Impairment: none
Current condition: keto rash; ketone level: 1.0 mmol/L


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