Mycotoxins in coffee when mold sensitive

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circular
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Mycotoxins in coffee when mold sensitive

Postby circular » Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:26 am

I think I've found I'm quite sensitive to the mycotoxins in coffee. To test this I started paying more for the Bulletproof brand of beans since they are lab tested to be mycotoxin free. I had put this off for years because of a Fast Company critique of Bulletproof coffee wherein a writer cites Joe Rogan:
“Good coffee providers know how to eliminate [mycotoxins] from coffee,” Rogan said on his show, citing a study he found on PubMed from the 1980s. “They’ve been able to solve it [for decades] with something called wet processing.” When the coffee plant’s berries are picked, the cherry (or bean) is “washed” in running water before it’s left to ferment and dry, reducing mycotoxin levels to negligible amounts. Everyone from Stumptown to Starbucks washes their beans this way."

But I haven't found that wet processed beans have always made a difference, so I somewhat dismissed the notion that I could be getting mycotoxin related nasal stuffiness from my morning coffee.

Later I found that Dr. Jill Carnahan cites three studies showing that many coffees do have mycotoxins. She recommends Bulletproof and Purity Coffee.

So I finally gave Bulletproof a try. I felt better drinking it, not as stuffy (not cured completely mind you since I think multiple things lead to my 'sinusitis', but notably better). Then yesterday I had a decaf out with friends and within minutes significant stuffiness came back. I thought, wow, maybe this means I'm not imagining the effect of mycotoxin free coffee!?

I asked the barista what coffee was used for the decaf. I had read that not just wet processed coffees but also high elevation coffees are less likely to have mycotoxins. She said the decaf was from Brazil. Then I just found this:
One thing Brazil coffee is not is high-grown. Growing elevations in Brazil range from about 2,000 feet to 4,000 feet, far short of the 5,000-plus elevations common for fine coffees produced in Central America, Colombia, and East Africa...
When [dry processed] coffee is dried inside the fruit, as most classic Brazil coffees are, lots of things can go wrong. The seed or bean inside the fruit is held hostage, as it were, to the general health and soundness of the fruit surrounding it. If the fruit rots, the coffee will taste rotten or fermented. If microorganisms invade the fruit during that rotting, a hard or medicinal taste will carry into the cup.

Next I was talking to a local coffee roaster at the local farmer's market about this. He said you have to be careful not to assume that all wet processed or high elevation is clean and all dry processed or low elevation isn't. He said having seen so many different sites, he's seen that you can have operations at high elevation doing wet processing that aren't as clean as some dry processors at low elevation, although generally you can use elevation and processing as a guide.

Ethiopia has some of the highest coffee elevations at about 6,000 feet, which could be good for me because I love Ethiopian coffee. The roaster I spoke with had more confidence in the quality of the Yirgacheffe than the Sidamo, so next I'll try to find a Yirgacheffe that seems to work that's cheaper than Bulletproof.

Has anyone else with sinus issues experimented with coffees?
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

circular
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Re: Mycotoxins in coffee when mold sensitive

Postby circular » Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:35 am

Here's another page that's more skeptical and worth a read. (Sorry I'm not deep into PubMed here ... this is just my speed today :D ) Interestingly it says this about decaf coffee, which is what caused my sinuses to rebel:
Decaf coffee tends to be higher in mycotoxins, because caffeine inhibits the growth of the molds. Instant coffee also contains higher levels than ground coffee. But even so, the levels are still too low to be of practical significance (18).

Well the effect when I drank that decaf (I normally don't drink decaf) seemed so direct and out of the blue, I'd agree with the first part, but not that it doesn't have practical significance. Effects seem to me to be more related to the high variability in complex individual biology than simply to the level of mycotoxins in a coffee.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Chameleon
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Re: Mycotoxins in coffee when mold sensitive

Postby Chameleon » Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:16 pm

I have to say that I use Bulletproof coffee and have had no issues and I am mold sensitive. That is why I use it.

circular
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Re: Mycotoxins in coffee when mold sensitive

Postby circular » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:30 pm

Chameleon wrote:I have to say that I use Bulletproof coffee and have had no issues and I am mold sensitive. That is why I use it.

Have you noticed issues with coffee if you’re not using the Bulletproof brand?

I found it interesting that the last link I posted here mentioned a lot of mycotoxins in chile, more than coffee. I love chilis but rarely eat them because I don’t feel great afterward. I’ve thought it may be the lectins or nightshade factor, but who knows, maybe all three.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


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