MTHFR and E4/E4

Newcomer introductions, personal anecdotes, caregiver issues, lab results, and n=1 experimentation.
Its Me
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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:43 pm

slacker wrote:Are you using the labs "normal" range for your test results, or a stricter criteria of what is considered "ideal"? For example, the "normal" range for homocysteine is up to 15 micromoles/L, where as doctors such as Bredesen suggest less than seven for cognitive health.


10/17 done at Quest Diagnostics:

B12 is: 507 (range 200 - 1100)

Homocysteine is: 8 (range < 10.4)

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:49 pm

slacker wrote:Are you using the labs "normal" range for your test results, or a stricter criteria of what is considered "ideal"? For example, the "normal" range for homocysteine is up to 15 micromoles/L, where as doctors such as Bredesen suggest less than seven for cognitive health.


You replied fast ! I edited my two posts (always that last couple of thoughts !)

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Sun Jan 06, 2019 5:24 pm

whit4health wrote:I will soon be 54 and I've been a pretty healthy eater and have exercised moderately since I was 24. I've noticed during certain times, my mind does not do as well, especially with changes during the monthly cycle.


The mind not doing well during monthly cycle is almost certainly hormonal. I was very foggy and disoriented, and could cry for no reason. Glad those days are over. You have no family history of Alzheimer's and your cholesterol is great. Alzheimer's is something I'd not worry about, keep living the healthy life style you do. Don't remove grains or change your diet unless you have the blood tests that indicate you have a B vitamin issue, I don't. Don't assume some senior forgetful moments mean anything. And for the heart attacks / strokes - know the relatives medical history. They may have had very high blood pressure, or atrial fibrillation, and it sounds like you don't. So my best advise is, don't assume anything bad is going on. Let your doctors and medical tests guide you and get any treatment they indicate as medically necessary. If there is a geriatric doctor at your medical center, make an appointment. I'm about to switch to a primary care doctor who is. Don't pressure your kids into some protocol, let them be normal healthy kids with a good life style and habits. I'd say relax, you don't have any indication anything is not well, and you are doing the rights things that you can.

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:42 pm

A friend with the MTHFR mutation has an issue and has this to say: About one third of the population has an MTHFR SNP and it usually doesn’t cause problems as you mentioned. If it does, it is most often associated with difficulty converting folic acid to the bioactive form—5 methyl tetrahydrofolate. There is an easy fix to MTHFR problems—take 5 methyl tetrahydrofolate directly (it is easily available as a supplement). People with SNP also often take an active form of B12—either methylcobalamin or hydroxocobalamin—together they support methylation and homocysteine levels are related to methylation. More than anyone probably wants to know...but...

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby WifeOfJoel » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:02 am

Torimintz wrote:I have 23 and me and have both 4 alleles. But... how do I know if I have the bad MTHFR. Which MTHFR am I exactly looking for. Are there different types?


After logging into 23andme, go to the upper right hand corner, where your name should be. On that pulldown menu, select "browse raw data." You can download your data by clicking the download tab (which will give you a long text file that you can search with a find function),
OR if you want to quickly check for the primary MTHFR SNP we are talking about, simply stay on the "browse" tab and enter into the search field: rs1801133 then click enter.

It should spit out a result. Look to the right column, under "your genotype." There should be G/G, G/A, or A/A.

G/G - normal genotype
G/A - heterozygous (one copy) for mutation
A/A - homozygous for the mutation

(The reason they report "A" instead of "T" and "C" instead of "G" on 23andme just has to do with the orientation of the DNA strand)

If, like me, you are homozygous for the mutation, I'd suggest checking your homocysteine levels and thinking about supplementing. According to SNPedia: "homozygous for C677T of MTHFR = 10-20% efficiency in processing folic acid = high homocysteine, low B12 and folate levels." You can read about all the increased risk of diseases on the Methylation wiki or on SNPedia here:https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1801133.

I just tested my homocysteine levels for the first time. They've probably been high my whole life, and I have been vegan for over 20 years, which can exacerbate that. I'm really grateful to Dr. Bredesen for his book and you all for this forum. I would never have known the problem or how to fix it!

physician scientist
Me: APOε3/3, MTHFR (C677T) homozygote
Partner: APOε4/4
Mother: APOε3/4

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby WifeOfJoel » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:08 am

roxanne wrote:For the MHTFR mutation my FM physician recommended Methyl Assist by Pure Encapsulations one pill twice a day and Homocysteine Factors again from Pure Encapsulations one pill twice a day. It does get to be expensive, though as Methyl Assist is $40.00 and Homocyseine Factors is $51.00. Methyl Assist lasts 1.5 months and Homocysteine Factors 3 months at the above dosage.


Roxane,
Do you know why he recommended you take both? They seem to contain the same ingredients (methyl folate, methyl B12, and B6), at slightly different ratios, and then either betaine or benfotiamine (I don't know anything about the latter). I'm guessing he wants you at a ratio in between the two formulations, or wants you to take both betaine and benfotiamine? I'm trying to decide if I need both, or can get away with just one (or maybe an even cheaper one)...

physician scientist
Me: APOε3/3, MTHFR (C677T) homozygote
Partner: APOε4/4
Mother: APOε3/4

Torimintz
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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Torimintz » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:14 am

THanks for the info on rs1133 . I am G/G on 23 and me

But, what about rs1131. I am T/T on 23ANDME, Is that the bad one?
Thanks.
It is all so confusing

Its Me
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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:43 am

WifeOfJoel wrote:After logging into 23andme, go to the upper right hand corner,

This was excellent help. I had no idea 23andMe had the menu option to browse the raw data. Provided you know what to search for. This was so quick to do.

The Promethease report might benefit those who want to see their total data in a report, that can be filtered many ways (and can upload multiple sources). For $5, seems a value and also links to the SNPedia topics to read.

Thank you.

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:00 pm

Torimintz wrote:But, what about rs1131. I am T/T on 23ANDME, Is that the bad one?
Thanks.


It seems you are GOOD! I am also T/T in 23andMe. On Promethease I am A/A and here is their chart.

Geno Mag Summary
(A;A) 0
(A;C) 2.1 Possibly impaired folate metabolism
(C;C) 2.5 Number of risks. Complex.

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Re: MTHFR and E4/E4

Postby Its Me » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:17 pm

WifeOfJoel wrote:I'd suggest checking your homocysteine levels and thinking about supplementing.

I think the blood test for homocysteine is a very good idea for those with the mutation. But I'd say not to supplement or make any diet change if tests are OK. The mutation is widely common and most people do not have a problem. And also given 23andMe's own advice to not do anything as clinical data is not adequate -
https://blog.23andme.com/health-traits/ ... thfr-gene/


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