4/4 female mid40s

Newcomer introductions, personal anecdotes, caregiver issues, lab results, and n=1 experimentation.
Torimintz
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:27 am

4/4 female mid40s

Postby Torimintz » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:41 am

removedremovedremovedvremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremovedremoved
Last edited by Torimintz on Fri Jan 18, 2019 4:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

mike
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 439
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:55 pm
Location: CA - Sonoma County

Re: 4/4 female mid40s

Postby mike » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:17 pm

Torimintz wrote:My story:

It is hard when the people you know change in front of you. My dad is in the final stages AD. He started going down hill about 5 years ago, right after my mom died. The first to go were the unhappy memories. Mostly he was okay, laughing off stuff he didn't remember. My mom's mom lived to over 100, but didn't know anyone for the last 10 years. I only saw her once during this time, but she seemed quite content. I'm 4/4, but it did not come as a shock because of my family history. I'm hoping for a different end.
Sonoma Mike
4/4

Anna
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 141
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 2:16 pm

Re: 4/4 female mid40s

Postby Anna » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:57 pm

Torimintz, your situation sounds beyond difficult on many levels. I am so sorry! I am at a loss for meaningful suggestions.

And your mom's situation is one of my biggest fears as a 4/4. I often wonder what I can do now to prevent this sort of isolation and lack of brain-health measures if I become unable to manage these things for myself someday.

My heart goes out to you and your mom.
~Anna
4/4 but so much more

katydid 3/4
New User
New User
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:57 am

Re: 4/4 female mid40s

Postby katydid 3/4 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:58 pm

Torimintz-
I feel your pain and am sorry for you. My own mom at 88 seems healthy and in fact has shown improvement in ways due to my dogged support with the part of the B. Protocol and other interventions I continue to provide ( at no small cost to my own health and relationships).
Still, I know the feeling when your mom loses her capacity for empathy. It feels brutal as a daughter who depended on her for emotional support all my life.
I know it is so hard but I suggest you keep trying to be her daughter and not fall into the role of nurse. Sounds like your dad is so controlling that may be all you can do. The good part of that is that you can take her on outings and spend time talking over the old times she can remember and sometimes they will surprise you with a poignant memory or two that you had forgotten. Whereas when you are the nurse and caretaker 24/7 you can end up so frustrated by the minute to minute demands of keeping them warm and dry and fed that you can loose out non any available joy.

Magda
Support Team
Support Team
Posts: 244
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:04 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: 4/4 female mid40s

Postby Magda » Fri Jan 11, 2019 5:43 pm

katydid 3/4 wrote:Torimintz-
I feel your pain and am sorry for you. My own mom at 88 seems healthy and in fact has shown improvement in ways due to my dogged support with the part of the B. Protocol and other interventions I continue to provide ( at no small cost to my own health and relationships).
Still, I know the feeling when your mom loses her capacity for empathy. It feels brutal as a daughter who depended on her for emotional support all my life.
I know it is so hard but I suggest you keep trying to be her daughter and not fall into the role of nurse. Sounds like your dad is so controlling that may be all you can do. The good part of that is that you can take her on outings and spend time talking over the old times she can remember and sometimes they will surprise you with a poignant memory or two that you had forgotten. Whereas when you are the nurse and caretaker 24/7 you can end up so frustrated by the minute to minute demands of keeping them warm and dry and fed that you can loose out non any available joy.


Katydid 3/4
Welcome to the forum! Thank you for your voice and supportive message to Torimintz.
I read your posts, and I understand you are very familiar with Dr. Bredese’s protocol.
On our site, I would like to send you to the PRIMER written and updated on regular basis by our members- Dr. Stavia.
It is filled with valuable information and maybe you will find there new tips, strategies, inspirations applicable to your unique family’s situation.
viewtopic.php?f=33&t=1418
The entire forum is a wonderful wealth of information. To learn how to get as much as possible out of the apoe4.info please go here:
https://www.apoe4.info/wiki/%22How-To%2 ... fo_website

The forum is a true community! We are here to helps, support and encourage one another. If at any point of your and your mom’s journey to better brain health, you get stuck and need help with anything, please do not hesitate to post.

My best,
Magda
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
IFM/Bredesen Trained, Reversing Cognitive Decline

WifeOfJoel
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:29 pm
Contact:

Re: 4/4 female mid40s

Postby WifeOfJoel » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:22 pm

That sounds terrible!

It sounds like you have to heal the relationship with your father to be able to spend time with your mother, and given what you said already, that will probably be tough. Are there any things that your dad responds positively to? I wonder if he has signs of dementia himself, and perhaps this increase in controlling behavior is his way of trying to cope with it (if you are 4/4 and he is your biological father, he has at least one copy of ApoE4).

*hugs*
Jennifer

physician scientist
Me: APOε3/3, MTHFR (C677T) homozygote
Partner: APOε4/4
Mother: APOε3/4


Return to “Our Stories”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests