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New Member, Sydney Australia

Newcomer introductions, personal anecdotes, caregiver issues, lab results, and n=1 experimentation.
johnseed
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Re: New Member, Sydney Australia

Postby johnseed » Mon Jun 17, 2019 1:07 am

[quote="floramaria"][quote="johnseed"] Thanks Floramaria, here's the reply from Edwards: " Thanks for your message. There are other health benefits in addition to what’s on our bottle, e.g. plant sterols (linked to cholesterol lowering), or a more balanced ratio of omega 3 to omega 6.

To answer your questions:
Your US colleague is correct, in general refined oils have a higher smoke point that cold pressed oils. However, cold pressed canola oil is an exception to other cold pressed oils and does have a higher smoke point between 205 and 240oC and Flashpoint of 328oC. This might be slightly less than the refined RBD canola oil (~240oC) but still high enough for all cooking applications. "

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Re: New Member, Sydney Australia

Postby floramaria » Mon Jun 17, 2019 12:01 pm

johnseed wrote: Thanks Floramaria, here's the reply from Edwards: " Thanks for your message. There are other health benefits in addition to what’s on our bottle, e.g. plant sterols (linked to cholesterol lowering), or a more balanced ratio of omega 3 to omega 6.
To answer your questions:
Your US colleague is correct, in general refined oils have a higher smoke point that cold pressed oils. However, cold pressed canola oil is an exception to other cold pressed oils and does have a higher smoke point between 205 and 240oC and Flashpoint of 328oC. This might be slightly less than the refined RBD canola oil (~240oC) but still high enough for all cooking applications. "


Very interesting! Thank you for letting me know. I was envying your ability to get that quality of Canola oil, so I went looking and found this products which is available in the US.

La Tourangelle Organic Canola Oil comes from expeller-pressed non-GMO organic rapeseeds, a bred variety of the mustard family, grown and processed without the use of any pesticide or chemicals. It comes from Europe where non-GMO rapeseed is grown following rigorous organic and non-GMO rules. It is a clean wonderful everyday cooking oil. Thanks to its low saturated fat content, a good balance of omega 3 and 6 and poly-unsaturated fat canola oil is considered one of the best oils for heart health. La Tourangelle is one of few remaining oil mills keeping a time-honored French heritage of roasting and pressing nut kernels into delicious oils. We are a family-owned company whose mastery of oil production is the fruit of passion, integrity, and pride. We strive to be the best artisan oil producer, dedicated to making carefully crafted, sustainable, natural products. With artisan care, we extract the seeds' essence and hidden natural treasures to create amazing products that bring delight in the kitchen and well being for the body.

I was wondering about it, since it says it is from organic, non-GMO rapeseed, and I was concerned that rapeseed would still have the compounds which made it unsafe to use. But then I didn’t know if there is any such thing as “canola seed”.
Here is the answer: “Scientists in Canada developed an edible version of the rapeseed plant, which — on its own — harbors toxic compounds called erucic acid and Glucosinolate”
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johnseed
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Re: New Member, Sydney Australia

Postby johnseed » Mon Jun 17, 2019 1:45 pm

Thanks Floramaria, yes there are canola seeds, these were bred from rapeseed by the Canadians using traditional (ie non-GMO) techniques. It sounds from the highlighted passage in the quote below that what they still call "rapeseed" in Europe is actually the improved variety called "canola"

https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/public ... ograph.pdf tells us that "By
definition, canola refers to B. napus and B. campestris lines containing less than 2% of the
total fatty acids as erucic acid. These canola varieties comprise almost the entire rapeseed
crop produced in the world today.
In 1997, the erucic acid content of 50% of the Australian
canola crop was 0.3% or less of the total fatty acids. The maximum reported erucic acid level
was 1.6% of the total fatty acids. "

So ... perhaps La Tourangelle Organic Canola Oil has minimal erucic acid? I guess you'd need to ask the company.

Re Glucosinolates, https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/ne ... cosinolate
" Abstract
Glucosinolates are biologically active compounds found in the Brassicaceae family of plants, including broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, rapeseed, mustard, and horseradish. Recent studies have shown beneficial effects of glucosinolates, including regulatory functions in inflammation, stress response, phase I metabolism, and antioxidant activities, as well as direct antimicrobial properties. However, livestock species fed rations with high glucosinolates may exhibit adverse effects, including reduced feed intake and growth, gastrointestinal irritation, goiter, anemia, and hepatic and renal lesions. High sulfur can be associated with trace mineral deficiencies and polioencephalomalacia. Therefore, although a good source of nutrition, it is best to avoid overfeeding Brassicaceae. This chapter describes toxicity and safety of glucosinolates from Brassicaceae."

I'm enjoying this fruitful conversation floramaria and will ask Edwards for the Glucosinolate and erucic acid content of their canola oil


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