Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

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Fiver
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby Fiver » Fri Nov 30, 2018 9:28 pm

Julie suggested I paste this here....from a note I sent her. In case It was belpful for anyone thinking about spreading the word....

I wanted to say thanks....just a general thanks for all you do and for apoe4.info. I was recently asked to give a community lecture. Just 20 minutes at the local Rotary chapter. A few state representatives were present - very cool.

This is what I said (more or less, I didn't read it). The response was really positive.

Your recent post about encouraging the medical community to get with the times was exactly what I was thinking when I outlined this talk....I only had a day or two, and it's busy here with the end of the semester. I tried very hard to balance everything.

Anyway, I would not have done this without the community at apoe4.info. So, in that way, *you* reached 100 new people today. PS - they asked specifically for the web address after a long Q&A session.


Good afternoon. My name is XXXXX. <my background, grandmother, grandfather, mom, etc. Clear disclaimer that I am not a medical doctor.>

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the cause of 60–70% of dementia cases. Symptoms include difficulty in remembering recent events, problems with language, disorientation, mood swings, loss of motivation, lack of self-care, and behavioral issues. Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease is rare. Late-onset AD, usually diagnosed after age 65, is much more common. However, the silent effects of AD on the brain begin decades earlier. Following diagnosis the typical life expectancy is three to nine years. In the late stages, patients require heroic assistance from caregivers.
Today there are 30 million people living with Alzheimer’s disease, including 5 million Americans. Nearly eight times as many people have preclinical or “silent” AD. By 2050, those numbers will increase to 160 million globally and 13 million in the United States alone. Healthcare analysts have predicted that this will bankrupt the Medicare system. Alzheimer’s is not only one of the most feared diseases it is among the most costly.
There is currently no effective treatment or cure for Alzheimer’s disease.
What occurs inside the brain of someone with AD is not fully understood. The most widely accepted view of Alzheimer’s disease goes something like this: Neurons begin to shed sticky amyloid beta peptides which clump and aggregate to form the plaques seen in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. You may be surprised to learn that this is a normal immune response of brain cells to attack by bacteria, parasites, and viruses – indeed, the sticky amyloid beta proteins entomb these invaders (you can see them under a microscope, buried inside of plaques!). In AD, however, the plaques build up and overwhelm the brain. They tend to occur around blood vessels. Here they damage the brain’s protective blood brain barrier….allowing more invaders into the brain. Dying neurons release a second type of protein, called tau, which also accumulates. This, along with the resulting inflammation, overwhelms the brain’s clean-up crew, cells called microglia. As the cycle continues, the brain – especially the hippocampus, where memories are stored – shrinks.
Why does this occur? We don’t know exactly but there are several known risk factors for AD. About half of the risk is genetic. Hundreds of genes contribute to the disease but the most widely known is the apoe4 risk gene. We each have no copies, one copy, or two copies of this gene. For men this raises the risk of developing the disease by age 85 from 11% to 23% to 51%. For women the risk increases from 14%, 30%, to 60%. But having the gene does not automatically mean that one will develop AD; genes are not destiny because the other half of the risk comes from “modifiable” risk factors – ones we can change!
Why isn’t there a cure? It’s not for a lack of trying. In the past decade, hundreds of clinical trials have been conducted, costing billions of dollars, without success. There are currently 112 potential new drugs in the pipeline but, so far, there is no revolutionary cure in sight. In light of this disappointing track record some are now questioning whether a single magic drug will ever be found. They suggest that AD is a complex disease that will be managed, not cured – like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome – with a combination of drugs and lifestyle changes.
Are such therapies possible? Perhaps they are. There is evidence that combinations of medicines, diets, exercise, and social activity can those “modifiable” risk factors enough to delay or slow the progression of AD, especially when started early. Evidence comes from large population studies in Europe, Asia and the United States. Some of you might have been on campus in April when Dr. Dale Bredesen, neurologist and researcher from UCLA, visited to talk about his multi-factorial protocol, which has shown some success. Other groups are testing similar approaches. More research is needed.
But consider this: In the absence of an effective treatment or cure any therapy that could delay or slow the disease would have great value. If we had a therapy to delay onset by only 1 year there would be almost 10 million fewer people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease in 2050.
What are these “modifiable” risk factors?
Head injury. Each year in the United States, there are 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries or TBIs, primarily in older Americans and those playing sports. TBI is of particular concern for military service members. It is a common battlefield injury, considered to be a “signature injury” of recent conflicts. There is fairly strong evidence that a TBI increases the risk of developing AD. For example, in a study with more than 350,000 veterans, even mild TBI without loss of consciousness, more than doubled the risk of dementia. So, protect your head, lower your risk.
Air quality. Air pollution, specifically ultrafine particulate PM2.5 pollution, is an established risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and respiratory disease and is an emerging risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. There have been at least 18 studies testing the possible connection between air pollution and AD, with most confirming a link. One large study in Ontario, Canada, reported that living close to major roads was associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Another, published this month, examined health records for >130,000 individuals living near London, from 2004 to the present, and found that those living in areas most polluted by NO2 and PM2.5 had a 40 per cent heightened risk of being diagnosed with AD. As you know, air quality is a significant problem in our area. Six regions of the commonwealth rank among the “25 worst” in the US for PM 2.5 pollution. In these regions high PM2.5 levels have been correlated to rates of hospital admissions for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and general dementia. By the way, this particular study ranked our hometown as the 3rd, 3rd, and 2nd worst area for these PM-induced diseases, respectively, in the northeastern US. If this concerns you consider supporting the Clean Air Board of Central PA. cleanairboard.wordpress.com
Diet. The standard American Diet is SAD…S….A….D. There is general agreement and good scientific evidence that healthier diets – such as the Mediterranean and Nordic diets – lower inflammation, insulin resistance, and help to low the risk of numerous diseases, including AD. Most general lifestyle approaches to lowering AD risk discourage the consumption of excess sugar and “bad” fats, while encouraging the consumption of colorful veggies, berries, and “good” fats. In my lab we study the molecules in several so-called “superfoods”; some inhibit the clumping of the A-beta peptides. There’s really no downside to smart, healthy eating.
Exercise. Exercise is good for the brain as well as the body. It can reduce, even reverse, hippocampal atrophy in the brain….even for those at genetic risk for the disease. It also increases brain derived neurotrophic factor which promotes the health and growth of neurons. Exercise improves insulin sensitivity, can lower inflammation, and improved the health of mitochondria.
Sleep. Get enough. Even one night of sleep deprivation increases plaque formation. And A-beta aggregation, in turn, disrupts the sleep-wake cycle. The glymphatic system, which drains wastes from the brain, works twice as fast during sleep.
Avoid or manage infections. Chronic infections, including those from tick bites, and uncontrolled inflammation raise the risk of cognitive decline. There is new and convincing evidence that some herpes viruses, especially herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, are risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. These extremely common viruses lay dormant in neurons and are reactivated intermittently by events such as immunosuppression, infection, and inflammation. There over 150 published studies that strongly support a role for active HSV1 infections in the development of AD. Several showed that the suppression of outbreaks via common and inexpensive antiviral medications alleviate the risk. This is especially useful news for those carrying the apoe4 risk gene: the gene makes individuals more susceptible to hsv outbreaks and less able to repair the damage. For someone suffering frequent hsv-1/2 outbreaks, the use of anti-viral medications are usually recommended; if they reduce the risk for later cognitive decline, all the better.
Together, these steps seem to reduce the overall risk of developing AD. In fact, some of these approaches seem to work better in those with a family history of AD.
Here is some more advice from patients and caregivers.
Start early. Get educated. Find a good “health team”. Develop good relationships with doctors who will listen and learn. Consider participating in a clinical trial.
If you opt to do genetic testing be aware that (1) you may learn good and bad things about your genetics and by extension those of your parents and your children, (2) that having a genetic test in your medical record may make you less likely to get long-term care insurance, and (3) that there is support available (one good online support community is available at apoe4.info). A recent survey done by Dr. Doris Zallen at Virginia Tech found that “Adverse psychological reactions were reported by a substantial fraction of” those learning they carry risk factors for AD but that “nearly all.…said that they had benefited in the long term from lifestyle changes….that they subsequently made.”
So if there is one thing I’d like you to remember today it is this: While there is not yet a cure, there are modifiable risk factors. Even small reductions in risk, which might delay or slow AD, have great value. By delaying onset by only 1 year there would be 10 million fewer people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease in 2050.[/quote]
Reading studies, need coffee. All I know: it's beautifully terribly complex. It's really a miracle that any of it works at all. Being healthy, but sometimes this mess of billions of neurons has had enough avocados and just wants a crunchy cookie.

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JML
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby JML » Fri Nov 30, 2018 10:53 pm

Julie G wrote: promote a public health campaign focused on Alzheimer's prevention through risk modification.

Julie G--I think this is a great idea. (Love the Warren Buffet reference too!)

Even though a lot of people may not want to do the hard work and make the lifestyle changes, some people will. And they may not yet know it is possible. A Public Service campaign could alert them. Getting the message out will take time, but we will find "recruits" and in the end, everyone who prevents or postpones cognitive decline will do a great service to themselves, their loved ones, and help prevent overload of the medical system.

I wish there were also a way to teach about brain health in elementary school. Kids should hear this message early and maybe we will even have a few early converts who will bring the message home to the parents and grandparents? Dreaming here...
Julie
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Enrolled in Reversing Cognitive Decline for Coaches

Fiver
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby Fiver » Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:59 pm

Another example of someone not waiting for "permission" to talk about prevention:
https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a2 ... tion-tips/
Reading studies, need coffee. All I know: it's beautifully terribly complex. It's really a miracle that any of it works at all. Being healthy, but sometimes this mess of billions of neurons has had enough avocados and just wants a crunchy cookie.

mike
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby mike » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:41 pm

Julie G wrote:_____
1.) Avoid head trauma. Moderate or severe traumatic brain injury leads to an increased risk that remains for years after original injury. Prevention efforts include:

-Seat belt use (through education and policy)

-Use of helmets when bicycling and participating in certain sports (through education and policy)

-Falls prevention: Putting safety measures in place at home (such as reducing tripping hazards, adding grab bars, and improving lighting)

-Exercise to improve balance and coordination

-Reviewing medicines and vision with health care provider

-Getting enough sleep



Great idea, but curious as to why you would put sleep in with Head Trauma, unless to prevent accidents?
Sonoma Mike
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Julie G
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby Julie G » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:45 pm

Great idea, but curious as to why you would put sleep in with Head Trauma, unless to prevent accidents?

Well rested people fall less? :? Keep in mind, these are the CDC's recommendations, not mine.

hairyfairy
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby hairyfairy » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:47 am

I`d love to know what the root cause of alzheimer`s really is, but I`ve researched for hours on the internet, & everyone seems to have a different theory about what causes it & how to prevent it. I`m hopelessly confused.

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slacker
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Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby slacker » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:30 am

hairyfairy wrote:I`d love to know what the root cause of alzheimer`s really is, but I`ve researched for hours on the internet, & everyone seems to have a different theory about what causes it & how to prevent it. I`m hopelessly confused.


I think that Dr Bredesen's approach is most helpful, since he shows that there are multiple root causes of cognitive decline, not just one. It makes sense to tailor the treatment to what is causing (or could cause) cognitive problems. Unfortunately, the same approach will not work for everyone; it's more complicated. With that being said, focusing on adequate sleep, exercise, improved nutrition, stress management, and avoidance of head injuries makes sense for everyone. There are a lot of controversies about what makes up the best nutrition, but we all agree that reducing sugar and junk/processed food is a good idea.
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Re: RE: Re: Too soon for Alzheimer's Prevention?

Postby Stavia » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:01 am

hairyfairy wrote:I`d love to know what the root cause of alzheimer`s really is, but I`ve researched for hours on the internet, & everyone seems to have a different theory about what causes it & how to prevent it. I`m hopelessly confused.
Thats because nobody knows, as I have stated clearly in my Primer.

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