Sites and links used for Facebook articles

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Kathleen1
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Sites and links used for Facebook articles

Postby Kathleen1 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:20 am

Hi all,
Sorry for a bit of a rant here, but I think it is very important to make sure that the site from which you share an article to the public does not represent extreme or antiscience views on other topics even if the referred article does not include such issues. Today's posting on FB shared a diet article--that is nice enough--but the sidebar on the site to which I was sent to read the full article included antivax and anticlimate articles. I know we are not commenting on those topics here, and indeed on this forum given the excellent admins and thoughtful commentary we can tolerate more divergent views, but I got uncomfortable with the fb site referral. there is implied approval of a source when you refer someone to it for an article. If people trust your opinion they carry that trust over to the referred source. The other agendas of the source are given subtle implied support in the reader's mind, even if you only meant them to review the one article, and did not mention anything else. I do not want us to be associated with "debunked' science in a public forum. Please feel free to move this post, or correct me if I have really misunderstood things. Thanks for all the hard work folks do to inform, educate and help one another in this forum and elsewhere.

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Julie G
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Re: Sites and links used for Facebook articles

Postby Julie G » Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:07 pm

To bring others up to speed, Kathleen is specifically talking about this article posted by one of our Facebook editors. While a keto diet is certainly debatable for E4 carriers, it's been shown to help offset our reduction in cerebral glucose utilization and hence a topic worthy of posting about. This editor choose to post the article because it was easy to understand. While direct references weren't provided, the information can be supported by science. Those of us who manage the Facebook page walk a fine line between being too "sciencey" and not approachable enough to a largely lay (non-science) audience. We use our facebook page to educate the public about ApoE4 issues and as an outreach for our forum. I think Kathleen brings up some good points and perhaps our Facebook staff should be more careful about the sourcing for our articles moving forward. That said, I stand behind our team and am deeply appreciative of all volunteer efforts. Our facebook page recently reached 3,000 likes so we must be pleasing some of our audience. :D

This is a good opportunity to remind everyone that we are an all volunteer organization. Our team (support team, moderators, FMCA interns, Facebook editors, board of directors, and many other volunteers) all freely give of their time, talent, and treasure so that we have a place to gather to talk about our concerns and educate the public at large. This Thanksgiving weekend is perfect time for me to express my gratitude. We warmly welcome everyones' help. Many hands make light work and increase our level of service. Feel free to reach out to volunteer your services to: donate@apoe4.info.

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Julie G
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Re: Sites and links used for Facebook articles

Postby Julie G » Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:17 pm

Interesting footnote: I just looked at the site that lead to Kathleen's rant on a PC. It looks very different than my previous smart phone view. :? Yikes! Point well taken.


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