Gundry Soda

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tesslo
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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby tesslo » Thu May 24, 2018 11:13 am

apod wrote:I've been meaning to give this a try (particularly in a restaurant setting, where my orders are already kind of wacky compared with the group, haha) -- have any of you tested this recipe out?



another yummy drink is lemon juice (fresh 0f course) in cold or HOT water! I tried putting a slice of lemon into hot water with a drop of stevia! Dr Gundry interviewed Dr Valter Longo Phd who wrote the "Longevity Diet" who breaks fasts with half a lemon in water so now I put lemon in everything!

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby Rainbow » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:12 am

I tried out the Gundry soda recipe and it's really amazing! I'm now using it for breaking my fasts — it's especially great on a hot day. I learnt the hard way that it's better for my body to break longer fasts gently, and the vinegar seems to do a good job of waking up my digestive system.

I'm interested in the question of balsamic vinegar versus apple cider vinegar: perhaps they have different health benefits? I'd also love to know what to look for when shopping for vinegars. I'm always put off when I see "caramel colorant" listed as a balsamic vinegar ingredient, but perhaps it's harmless — I haven't had the time to do any research.
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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby McGido » Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:00 pm

I drink Zevia's ... not sure if there is much research on zevia leaf extract but it's 0 calories and 0 sugar and they have so many good flavours!

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby slacker » Thu Aug 23, 2018 7:51 am

Rainbow wrote: I'm always put off when I see "caramel colorant" listed as a balsamic vinegar ingredient, but perhaps it's harmless — I haven't had the time to do any research.


I found a "low" cost store brand balsamic at Whole Foods without the caramel colorant.
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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby ApropoE4 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 9:11 am

See, when someone makes a claim such as "Diet soda increases risk of diabetes by 67%" - a claim which is (1) baseless and (2) obviously false, there's no reason to keep watching. I'm assuming he later on goes and suggests a drink made of sparkling water and balsamic vinegar which for all intents and purposes is just 20% sugar syrup + very strong acid and flavorings, so more or less the same stuff that's in non-diet soda. Drinking this drink would be (1) the same as drinking soda and (2) obviously less healthy than just drinking the water.

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby TheresaB » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:00 am

ApropoE4 wrote:when someone makes a claim such as "Diet soda increases risk of diabetes by 67%" - a claim which is (1) baseless


Actually, I think Dr Gundry was referring to this study Diet Soda Intake and Risk of Incident Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)*] which says:

RESULTS
At least daily consumption of diet soda was associated with a 36% greater relative risk of incident metabolic syndrome and a 67% greater relative risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with nonconsumption (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.11–1.66] for metabolic syndrome and 1.67 [1.27–2.20] for type 2 diabetes).


Bold font added to direct attention.

MESA is a population-based study of 6,814 Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and Chinese adults, aged 45–84 years, initiated to investigate the prevalence and progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD).


So not completely baseless.
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MarcR
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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby MarcR » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:38 am

While we're talking about baseless and obviously false statements, let's examine this argument. Paraphrasing:

"Balsamic vinegar's sugar concentration is high; therefore, a beverage consisting of 2 T of balsamic vinegar in a glass of mineral water is just like commercial soda pop."

Of course, a 12 oz cola contains 36 grams of sugar; Dr. Gundry's homemade beverage contains just 5. One doesn't need to put any stock in the sulphur and resveratrol content of Gundry soda to see value in the substitution.

Plain water may well be better for human health than Gundry soda, but that's not his point. He's suggesting it as an alternative to the exceptionally deleterious commercial products that many people already consume.

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby ApropoE4 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:16 am

MarcR wrote:While we're talking about baseless and obviously false statements, let's examine this argument. Paraphrasing:

"Balsamic vinegar's sugar concentration is high; therefore, a beverage consisting of 2 T of balsamic vinegar in a glass of mineral water is just like commercial soda pop."

Of course, a 12 oz cola contains 36 grams of sugar; Dr. Gundry's homemade beverage contains just 5. One doesn't need to put any stock in the sulphur and resveratrol content of Gundry soda to see value in the substitution.

Plain water may well be better for human health than Gundry soda, but that's not his point. He's suggesting it as an alternative to the exceptionally deleterious commercial products that many people already consume.


I didn't say it's like drinking as much sweetened soda.

The healthy alternative is to not drink soda.

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby ApropoE4 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:23 am

TheresaB wrote:
ApropoE4 wrote:when someone makes a claim such as "Diet soda increases risk of diabetes by 67%" - a claim which is (1) baseless


Actually, I think Dr Gundry was referring to this study Diet Soda Intake and Risk of Incident Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)*] which says:

RESULTS
At least daily consumption of diet soda was associated with a 36% greater relative risk of incident metabolic syndrome and a 67% greater relative risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with nonconsumption (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.11–1.66] for metabolic syndrome and 1.67 [1.27–2.20] for type 2 diabetes).


Bold font added to direct attention.

MESA is a population-based study of 6,814 Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and Chinese adults, aged 45–84 years, initiated to investigate the prevalence and progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD).


So not completely baseless.



I'm sure Gundry is aware that this is an epidemiological study. It is saying that people who report drinking diet soda every day are more likely to have t2d.

What it does not say at all is that diet soda causes diabetes or raises incidence by 67%

There are many other studies that have not replicated even the epidemiological results, and while there is a chance some artificial sweeteners worsen metabolic issues, the numbers are very small.

Finally, since the total impact of BMI and nutrition on T2D incidence is a 40% increase from the lowest risk to the highest risk group, it would be more than incredible if just one food that has no glucose or other calories would have a 67% impact.

It is a shame someone would prey on the gullible by misusing study results - here as with the PREDIMED study from the other thread...

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Re: Gundry Soda

Postby Brian4 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:46 am

Just tried to dig up a reference in my notes and failed – apologies, but I do know there tends to be enough lead in many brands of balsamic vinegar that the California Prop. 65 warning is triggered. Now, the amount that triggers the warning is fairly low (absurdly low, some would claim), and I'd advise people who aren't pregnant not to worry about it, esp. if they're just putting a bit on salads a few times a week. But consuming a concoction daily, or more than once a day, with a couple tablespoons of the stuff might not be so safe. Not sure we know. Apple cider vinegar probably has many of the same benefits, but is much less likely to have lead in it.


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