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Sweets

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:24 pm
by udeskym
I love ice cream. I came across Soy Delicious Sugar Free ice cream and thought it might be too good to be true. Here's from a review: So Delicious Dairy Free No Added Sugar Ice Cream emerge. It’s naturally-sweetened with erythritol and monk fruit extract, and contains just 1 gram of sugar per serving! What do we know about erythritol and monk fruit extract? Worth it in small doses? Or are these sugar alcohols bad for the gut, which I've also read.

Re: Sweets

Posted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:43 am
by TheresaB
There are 13 matches for erythritol, here are the results from the search. https://www.apoe4.info/forums/search.php?st=0&sk=t&sd=d&sr=posts&keywords=erythritol&start=10.

Personally, I think it's probably best to keep any sweet taste to a minimum whether sugar, non-sugar but natural, or outright artificial. They all prompt the same pleasure signal in the brain, eating sweetness makes the brain want more sweetness. Any sweet taste produces an insulin response and as ApoE4s, maintaining insulin sensitivity is critical. Sweetness also disrupts a body's seasonal clock. Sweetness, typically derived from fruit, was never a year round experience for our ancestors, eating it year round disrupts the natural rhythm of our genes.

Re: Sweets

Posted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:27 pm
by thjj
Dr. Gundry wrote that soy contains lectins, fyi..

Re: Sweets

Posted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:38 pm
by SoCalGuy
The one sweet I see Gundry and Valter Longo recommend is dark chocolate. They generally prefer 70% cocoa content or greater and Longo recommends chocolate with no added sugar. Granted it won't be sugary sweet and will be quite bitter but it does contain polyphenols so there is some potential benefit although I wouldn't call it a health food. I've pretty much decided to forego sweets and limit them to special occasions like my anniversary or stuff like that. I figure 3-4 times per year is a reasonable compromise although I understand that can be tough to follow.

Re: Sweets

Posted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:47 pm
by TheresaB
thjj wrote:Dr. Gundry wrote that soy contains lectins, fyi..


You are right about that, although he allows fermented soy (Tempeh). He’s also said that soy contains mostly Omega-6 fats which are inflammatory. Almost all soy (and corn) is produced from genetically modified seed and sprayed with Round-up. Soy is also a big source of phytoestrogen, and Dr Gundry has said the typical American diet already has too much estrogen consumption, primarily from the preservative BHT which acts like estrogen. That leads to fat storage, early puberty in girls, and “man-boobs”.

Re: Sweets

Posted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:13 pm
by NewRon
TheresaB wrote: Any sweet taste produces an insulin response


Do you have any references for this? I've been trying to find some.

Re: Sweets

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 5:41 am
by TheresaB
NewRon wrote:
TheresaB wrote: Any sweet taste produces an insulin response


Do you have any references for this? I've been trying to find some.


Dr Gundry's book, "The Plant Paradox" but the above quote is about the extent of his discussion in the book. So I googled and found some articles.

This one, https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ar ... n#section4 addressed different artificial sweeteners although erythritol and monk fruit extract, the subject of this thread, were not among them, but it said, "The effect of artificial sweeteners on insulin levels seems to be variable, and the results are inconclusive. It may also depend on the individual."

Re: Sweets

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:41 am
by mike
NewRon wrote:
TheresaB wrote: Any sweet taste produces an insulin response


Do you have any references for this? I've been trying to find some.


You might try this - it says results are mixed... https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar-insulin

Re: Sweets

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:11 am
by NewRon
Many thanks!

Re: Sweets

Posted: Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:56 am
by DLP
udeskym wrote:I love ice cream. I came across Soy Delicious Sugar Free ice cream and thought it might be too good to be true. Here's from a review: So Delicious Dairy Free No Added Sugar Ice Cream emerge. It’s naturally-sweetened with erythritol and monk fruit extract, and contains just 1 gram of sugar per serving! What do we know about erythritol and monk fruit extract? Worth it in small doses? Or are these sugar alcohols bad for the gut, which I've also read.


I love this stuff! I eat it regularly as an after dinner dessert. I'm hoping my doc, whom I'm meeting with on 1/31, doesn't take it away from me! :D