Our 3rd annual meet-up will piggyback on the LowCarb USA conference in San Diego, CA, August 3-6.

Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
GenePoole0304
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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby GenePoole0304 » Sat Apr 25, 2015 8:03 am

DrD another case worth reading

http://www.nypcvs.org/images/Dayspring_Case_132.pdf

Here is a bit more from a drug company on why a low dose statin is used
http://www.evaluategroup.com/Universal/ ... y&id=34165


My opinion is that the life of an LDL particle is irrelevant as it is the other things that are happening as one can see from the case study.

Beware of one thing that did not turn out well in DrD suggestion as it is not dated. It is the combination product.
http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/la ... TufyZMavao

a bit outdated but still a useful guide
https://www.lipidcenter.com/pdf/Lipid_T ... orithm.pdf

One someone finds out the test requested by Bresden can they post as they might be different but I doubt it for the first round.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby marthaNH » Sat Apr 25, 2015 12:43 pm

Hear, hear. +1.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby MarcR » Sat Apr 25, 2015 2:08 pm

Case 132 is fascinating, Gene - thanks for sharing. I especially enjoyed the discussion of how high intestinal cholesterol absorption downregulates hepatic LDL receptors (thereby slowing LDL particle clearance) as well as hepatic cholesterol synthesis (thereby reducing the effectiveness of statin therapy). I also understand now why ezetimibe is typically combined with a statin - ezetimibe reduces intestinal absorption, which upregulates hepatic cholesterol synthesis, which then requires a statin to downregulate.

I appreciate the cautionary note regarding Vytorin, the ezetimibe / statin combo pill. Dr. Dayspring's buttons, levers, and dials approach to managing lipids is attractive, but using potent pharmaceuticals to control fundamental metabolic processes also carries risk. As someone who doesn't fit any of the four scenarios in Dr. Dayspring's lipid treatment algorithm, I think I'll continue to content myself with using foods and food-like substances (e.g. sardines, nuts, niacin, psyllium husk, amla, cod liver oil, etc.) to optimize health. I continue to believe that there is some epidemiological uncertainty regarding the overall health benefits of using drugs to change lipid metabolism in the absence of existing heart disease or rare genetic defects like familial hypercholesterolemia.
(Formerly merouleau)

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby marthaNH » Sat Apr 25, 2015 6:50 pm

Very sensible. My daily prayer (seriously) is "please let me not act like a crazy person today." This kind of attitude is helpful.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby circular » Sat Jun 27, 2015 11:41 am

Not sure if anyone has posted this review yet:

Plant sterols and cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis (CC)
Bernd Genser , Günther Silbernagel , Guy De Backer , Eric Bruckert , Rafael Carmena , M. John Chapman , John Deanfield , Olivier S. Descamps , Ernst R. Rietzschel , Karen C. Dias , Winfried März
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehr441 444-451 First published online: 14 February 2012

"Our systematic review and meta-analysis did not reveal any evidence of an association between serum concentrations of plant sterols and risk of CVD."
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby thumperama » Mon Oct 05, 2015 3:47 pm

thumperama wrote:

Testing for ApoE

Further he commented that he read the recent research about the quantity of ApoE being more important than the ApoE genotype. He asked someone at HDL Labs if they could test for that. It turns out they already collect the data. They just don't report it. We need to find a way to convince HDL Labs to add that metric to their reports.


I just had an exchange on Twitter with Dr Dayspring. He recently mentioned that he is now the Chief Academic Officer of True Health Diagnostics, a firm that purchased HDL Labs. So, I asked him at Dr Attia's comment. He didn't say that Dr Attia misspoke, but he did say that he is aware of Dr Attia's comment and that ApoE measurements are not available, rather only genotyping is.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby Juliegee » Tue Oct 04, 2016 4:44 pm

Bringing up a blast from the past! I was recently reviewing my THD labs that were a part of my CIRS workup and noticed that I had a very exaggerated response to Sitosterol (plant sterols.)

Apparently the optimal range is: 1.43-3.17 and I came in at a whopping 6.67. They also used the Sitosterol to Cholesterol ratio (102 mmol/mol Cholesterol.) The optimal range is: 76-168 and I came in at 261. Does anyone else have numbers this high? I do eat a lot of veggies...maybe not such a good thing for me???

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby GenePoole0304 » Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:59 pm

best to avoid plant sterols! although they can be beneficial depending on how ones body handles them..but E4's I believe do not do well in that category.

"in the absence of existing heart disease"

Well CVD is part of the aging process. this scientist has been largely ignored although his hypothesis seems to be largely correct based on what is known and not taken out of context by other researchers and writers who are setting back the understanding.

http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.ca/2 ... botin.html

Well then your gut microbiome is very important and so is the fiber.. see study on 200g of carrots/day and cholesterol.

" The effect of raw carrot on serum lipids and colon function

J Robertson, WG Brydon, K Tadesse, P Wenham, A Walls and MA Eastwood

Two hundred grams of raw carrot eaten at breakfast each day for 3 weeks significantly reduced serum cholesterol by 11%, increased fecal bile acid and fat excretion by 50%, and modestly increased stool weight by 25%. This suggests an associated change in bacterial flora or metabolism. The changes in serum cholesterol, fecal bile acids, and fat persisted 3 weeks after stopping treatment."

http://freetheanimal.com/2012/04/raw-carrots-wtf.html

Juligee you might be a hyper absorber so what foods do you eat contain high plant sterols? would avocados fill the bill?
http://www.livestrong.com/article/55663 ... gesterone/

high content
http://www.organicavos.com/nutrition.htm

I don't eat em too often and not recently for sometime due to possible allergy or similar...

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby LAC1965 » Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:27 pm

Juliegee, my THD results are quite similar to yours, Sitosterol = 4.68, Sitosterol/Cholesterol ratio = 254. At the time I was eating at least one avocado a day and lots of nuts.

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Re: Our first guest: Dr. Thomas Dayspring...

Postby Stavia » Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:56 pm

is the number clinically relevant?
In the context of low cardiovascular risk should one be worried about a sitosterol number?


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