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New APOE4 homozygote

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larshaakon
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New APOE4 homozygote

Postby larshaakon » Tue Sep 20, 2016 1:03 pm

Hi all,

I am a 38 year old man living in Oslo, Norway. I recently did a 23andme gene test and found out I am an APOE4 homozygote.

I came across the Bredesen protocol and went to my GP here in Oslo and asked him to do all the tests. Surprisingly, he agreed. I now have a lot of blood test results, but not really sure what to do with them... I am happy to share the blood test results with anyone who cares, or to post them here for all to view (assuming thi is not against any guidelines).

Does anyone have any advice? What are the most important things to do? What to do with the blood test results?

I also came across some research in the UK focused (by Christopher Exley) on aluminium and basically recommending people to drink water with high silicon content. Here is one article on this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... inium.html. Is this something that should be taken seriously?

Best,

Lars

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Stavia
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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Stavia » Tue Sep 20, 2016 1:20 pm

Hi Lars and welcome.
Here's some replies to your questions.
Yes, we would be very interested in your biomarkers if you wish to share them.
I have written a summary of what are currently thought to be the most important strategies
viewtopic.php?f=33&t=1418
Of note is that currently AD is thought to be multifactorial in origin thus there is no single magic bullet.
The mineral water trial was very short and very small and the cognitive test administered is a very blunt assessment. I dont even use it in my work due to its unreliability, I use the full 100 point ACER.
The mineral water is unlikely to be able to be reliably applied universally as a single AD prevention. However in selected individuals who have aluminum toxicity causing AD, it should be studied.
Looking forward to seeing your tests if you wish to share.

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby larshaakon » Tue Sep 20, 2016 3:04 pm

Dear Stavia,

thanks for your quick reply. Attached are the blood test results. Note that they are in Norwegian, but I guess/hope that most will be understandable. If there is anything that is not understandable, please let me know and I will try to translate.

Very much looking forward to your thoughts!

Lars
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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Stavia » Tue Sep 20, 2016 4:11 pm

wow!! your doc has done a heap of tests!
ok here is my interpretation
1. you do not have rheumatoid arthritis, h.pylori , syphilis, coeliac disease, renal disease, moulds, Hep C, HIV or the gene for ankylosing spondylitis
2. you are immune to CMV, EBV and chicken pox
3. You do not have immunity to Hep A, toxoplasmosis
4. Your Vitamin D3 could be better. It is 68 (equivalent to American units 27ish). I would personally run it a bit higher. It is controversial how high to go, but I would personally be at least 75, and up to 100 of your units. Others in our community run it around 125. (mine is around 100)
5. Your CRP and ferritin are elevated. This is a marker of inflammation/infection. Did you have a virus when the test was taken? This needs to be repeated in a couple weeks please if possible. A single outlying result is not enough with this test to comment, as these values change rapidly with infection and take a while to settle.
6. Your homocysteine is a bit high at 10.4. Please read my section on homocysteine in my explanation thread and decide if you wish to run this lower.
7. Your Hba1c is also a bit high at 5.6. It is either from too many carbs in your diet in excess of what you are burning in your workouts, or from too much protein in excess of your body's requirements. Please research gluconeogenesis - basically excess protein is converted directly to glucose.
8. Your HDL is very good for a man at 1.3. I cant see the rest of the lipids, I am going back to the photos to check for them...nope not there
9. Your Borrelia test is positive - this is tickbite right? not present in my country, I am not experienced in them

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Starfish77 » Tue Sep 20, 2016 5:50 pm

Welcom Lars,
How great you are starting out with so many tests already completed. Stavia, the person who answered your first post, has written an excellent introduction "Getting Started". It includes lots of useful information. She has a gift for explaining so those of us with little or no medical background can understand. It is so interesting to have people on our forum from all over the world. I believe you are the first person from Norway, that I have seen anyway. Welcome, I'm glad you found us.
Starfish E4/E4 79

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Nancy » Tue Sep 20, 2016 11:17 pm

Welcome Lars! I am not a doctor like Stavia, but I did have Lyme disease at one time. Fine now. But if you are positive for Boriella it is important to be treated. You can go to the ILADS website and find a doctor who is an expert on that, which is very important.
Glad you found us while you are young and can therefore do more to prevent any problems from being ApoE4. It is great that you are being proactive.
3,4

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Ruth » Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:21 am

Welcome, Lars!

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby larshaakon » Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:44 am

Dear Stavia and all!

Thank you very much for the very quick and good input. I see that something went wrong when I uploaded the documents, and that the two last pages from the blood test were not uploaded. I have tried to include them now and hope it works. I guess (hope) the test(s) you did not see should be there, Stavia.

My GP mentioned the Borrelia finding. But he did not say anything about treating it. Is this normal? Is it just that he is not so knowledgable about Borrelia? I know virtually nothing about it myself, but guess I should read a bit about it...

I will look into the comments and read up on the various points you mention, Stavia, and then see how they should be addressed.

Best,

Lars
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Stavia
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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby Stavia » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:25 am

Cool.
Your thyroid tests are ok. Don't worry about the slightly raised t3.
I see again a raised crp.
Copper zinc selenium satisfactory.
Renal function good.
Lipids including small dense LDL good.
Is there a trace of blood in your urine dipstix?
Sorry but borrelia is out of my experience. Maybe the test stays positive after the infection is dead in the same way CMV or EBV does? You'd have to ask your GP.

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Re: New APOE4 homozygote

Postby slacker » Wed Sep 21, 2016 12:12 pm

Given that Stavia is not experienced with Lyme diagnosis, I'm coming off the bench to try to answer the question. Disclaimer: I am not a Lyme expert but do have some experience with the very confusing and complicated testing algorithm done in the US (CDC Center for Disease Control recommendations).

First, most conventional western providers in the US would not test for Lyme without some of the classic signs and symptoms of the infection - not only because of lack of familiarity, but also because of high degree of false positives (test is positive without having the disease) and false negatives (test is negative but person has the disease). Also, without symptoms or known tick bite, will insurance cover the testing? A functional medicine doctor is more likely to order the tests, and is also more likely to interpret the results differently than lab stated normal ranges. I'm sure this comes as no surprise to my fellow ApoE4s who have been following along for a while.

In my experience, the initial screening lab tests for antibodies against the critter, spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. It normally reports separate IgM and IgG to differentiate between recent and past infections. Lars' test does not appear to report to antibody levels, but perhaps I missed something in the report (I can blame that on my poor Norwegian) :D. If the screening test is abnormal, a confirmation test is run. Spirochetes are not easily cultured (if at all).

Quoting Medscape on Lyme serology:
Serologic testing for Lyme disease is complex. Rational ordering and interpretation of these test results requires some understanding of the basic underlying principles and performance characteristics of the tests. The test results do not rule in or rule out Lyme disease; however, the results make a clinical diagnosis of Lyme disease more (or less) likely.
The most frequently used test is the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Much less often used for this purpose is the immunofluorescent assay (IFA).[2]
The principal limitation of these serologic tests has been the high frequency of both false-negative results and false-positive results. False-negative results occur during the acute phase of Lyme disease, when patients have not yet developed a sufficient antibody response to give a positive serologic test. Seroconversion can take as long as 6-8 weeks after a tick bite. The false-negative rate for ELISA is 32% in early disease.
A variety of diseases, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, syphilis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause false-positive ELISA results. Also, a small percentage of the healthy population has positive test results with ELISA testing. For these reasons, confirmatory Western blot testing is recommended.
Patients with early Lyme disease who are treated with antibiotics may never develop positive titers. Of patients with early disseminated disease, 90% have a positive titer. Some patients with late disease are seronegative, but significant controversy exists regarding the frequency of late seronegativity. Most authorities suggest that this phenomenon is rare.


Hope that helps! :lol:
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