CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Russ » Fri May 15, 2015 7:56 am

Chris Masterjohn has a timely post up with deeper insight about this methionine/glycine question that I find both educational and useful...

http://www.westonaprice.org/blogs/cmast ... thylation/

with this key paragraph...
One should then ask this question: is it better to achieve this balance by restricting methionine, or is it better to achieve this balance by adding vitamin B12, folate, vitamin B6 and glycine? The figure linked to above suggests a benefit to consuming these nutrients together: when the entire network of nutrients is present, extra methionine does not cause homocysteine to accumulate; rather, it allows the synthesis of taurine, sulfate, and glutathione. Taurine is very important to the function of the brain and retina. Sulfate is added to many compounds to regulate or detoxify them. Glutathione is the master antioxidant of the cell, one of the key compounds involved in detoxification, and a key regulator of protein function. Poor glutathione status appears to contribute to a wide array of degenerative diseases, including diabetes, asthma, and most of the negative effects that we associate with aging. Restricting methionine is one way of preventing homocysteine from accumulating; but restricting methionine compromises the supply of taurine, sulfate, and glutathione. By contrast, supplying the nutrients that synergize with methionine both prevents homocysteine from accumulating and allows the synthesis of these three incredibly important compounds.

...made even usefully simple at the end...
Instead, my practical advice is as follows:

- To the extent you eat meat, balance it with skin and bones in similar proportions as they would occur in the animal. To get a sense of these proportions, try buying whole or almost-whole animals such as roast chickens for a while.
- To the extent you eat these animal products, accompany them with rich supplies of a diverse array of plant foods, especially green leafy vegetables.
- Follow your intuition and appetite, within the restrictions of your social life and cultural ties, to the extent you operate comfortably within them.

Beyond this, in the absence of a specific problem that needs addressing, relax, and start eating food instead of analyzing it.


Of course no differential insight directly for E4's, but I'm thinking that that glutathione function is something we E4's especially want.

Onward....
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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Russ » Mon Jun 01, 2015 7:22 am

An interesting new paper from Japan pointing to anti-aging benefits of glycine as related to mitchondrial health....

http://www.gizmag.com/reversal-of-aging ... nes/37721/

To test the theory, the researchers found two genes associated with mitochondrial function and essentially experimented with turning them on or off. In doing so, they were able to create defects or restore cellular respiration. These two genes regulate glycine, an amino acid, production in mitochondria, and in one of the more promising findings, a 97-year-old cell line saw its cellular respiration restored after the addition of glycine for 10 days.

The researchers' findings were published this month in the journal Scientific Reports.

Whether or not this process could be a potential fountain of youth for humans and not just human fibroblast cell lines still remains to be seen, with much more testing required. However, if the theory holds, glycine supplements could one day become a powerful tool for life extension.

Paper here...
http://www.nature.com/srep/2015/150522/ ... 10434.html
Abstract
Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

Full paper...
srep10434_glycine2015.pdf

Now I still think actual bone broth is probably best, but since my Gundry call, even though a not yet fully developed and tested hypothesis, I supplement w 500 mg glycine before bed each night, and also in tandem with any (methionine laden) red meat I eat if I'm not also having broth at the same time.
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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Tincup » Mon Jun 01, 2015 8:49 am

Russ,

After your post summarizing the Gundry call, I started adding 2 g of glycine morning & evening plus whatever bone broth I cook up. An item of discussion in our upcoming call with Dr. G. When I looked at the references, more looked better than less...
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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby GenePoole0304 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 4:12 pm

Russ said

"Now I still think actual bone broth is probably best, but since my Gundry call, even though a not yet fully developed and tested hypothesis, I supplement w 500 mg glycine before bed each night, and also in tandem with any (methionine laden) red meat I eat if I'm not also having broth at the same time."

Here I can buy bone broth in a bottle or you can also get chicken broth and use as part of a soup base which I do. I have used the supplements just a you did for a while but gave up last winter. I still use the broth occasionally. A slow cooker does a really good chicken or guinnea hen and the weston price recipe is quite good for the vegetable stock base.
I do eat about 100g of chicken liver olnce a week, with onions, and mushrooms pan fried.

good papers!

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Stavia » Fri Jun 05, 2015 3:14 pm

I've been re-reading this massive and excellent thread in the light of our meetings last week. Lots that we can apply safely IMO. Though of course enormous gaps in the puzzle.
No pressure Julie n Martha - you are both extremely busy - I expect no video links of the conference yet?

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Julie G » Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:33 pm

Stavia, perfect timing. I haven’t played with them very much, but I was given these links yesterday from the conference organizers. I’m not sure about video...but there is a wealth of information here including notes from various speakers with graphics they used, etc. Enjoy!

http://www.nyas.org/Publications/Ebrief ... c5dd40e4ac

http://www.nyas.org/Publications/Ebrief ... fault.aspx

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby marthaNH » Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:41 pm

I just took a few minutes to get a sense of what's there but am up to my neck in summer school so can't follow up right now. Soon

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Stavia » Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:14 pm

Thanks Julie :)
I'll go thru them next week. I doubt there is anything your eagle eye has missed though!

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby Stavia » Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:37 pm

Wow!!!
Cunnane says " replacing glucose with ketones works well only in patients with insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance, which is common in patients with AD, blocks glucose utilization and ketone production from stored fatty acids."
This is new to me.
Probably not to everyone else...

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Re: CONFERENCE The Role of Nutrition in Dementia Prevention and Management March 26 - 27, 2015

Postby SusanJ » Sat Jun 06, 2015 3:30 pm

I noted the same thing about ketones and insulin sensitivity, and don't remember us discussing that in the past. But I also know I sometimes don't remember my posting a particular shiny bit here and there either. :lol:

Think it points us back to focusing on resolving any IR issues first. We know IR is not good for anyone.


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