FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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LillyBritches
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FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby LillyBritches » Wed May 20, 2015 3:58 am

Check it:

Omega-3 fatty acids enhance cognitive flexibility in at-risk older adults

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility.


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The new study focused on 40 cognitively healthy older adults between the ages of 65 and 75 who are carriers of a gene variant (APOE e4) that is known to contribute to the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease.


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'We wanted to confirm that higher omega-3 fatty acids related to better cognitive flexibility, and we did in fact see that,' Zamroziewicz said. 'We also wanted to confirm that higher omega-3 fatty acids related to higher volume in the anterior cingulate cortex, and we saw that. Finally, we were able to show that higher volume in the anterior cingulate cortex was an intermediary in the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and cognitive flexibility.'


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 084322.htm

Ain't nobody at a higher risk for LOAD than we are, right? This is about US, dear hearts. Pass the purest salmon, highest-quality krill oil supplement, and algae-derived omega-3 supplement, please. :)
I'm just a oily slick in a windup world with a nervous tick.

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Russ
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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby Russ » Wed May 20, 2015 6:18 am

Lilly - Excellent find! For all the discussion about LDL/HDL lipids, this kind of lipid analysis feels just as important.

Makes me feel even better about my progress from an Omega3 Index of 5.6% to 9.6% after ~6 months of more fish and sardine salads for lunch most everyday. My only caution is that I doubt this is a case where more is better, but rather about having the right balance. Per conversations way back, I also don't think it's as simple as supplementing fish oil which can rapidly oxidize, but importantly about consuming omega 3 as present in whole foods. That's my strategy anyway...

Note that I found the direct link in the news article to the paper to be dead, so inserting it here for ease...
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/ ... 7/abstract

Also uploading the provisional full paper pdf found there in case that disappears at some point...
144832_Zamroziewicz_ProvisionalPDF.pdf
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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby Stavia » Wed May 20, 2015 7:04 am

Thanks Lilly. Great find.

Russ, I can't find anywhere in my test that would have a 9.6%...
would you please mind looking here and telling me if you think my test is ok?
I eat heaps of fish and supplement a little with Ovega on days I dont think Ive had enoughImage

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby SusanJ » Wed May 20, 2015 8:05 am

It looks like on your test it's the Omega FA Index, and being 10.46 puts you in the stellar, "we rarely see numbers in that range" (quote taken from my doctors response to my last test).

BTW, I do supplement since it's the only way I can get therapeutic levels for treating RA. If you do supplement, buy quality products from a reputable source to minimize your chances of rancid products. I use Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega. Others can pitch in with their favorites.

If you take it in pill form, you can bite into a capsule to make sure it's not rancid, and then spend the rest of the day using your favorite mouthwash...obviously, I'm not a big fan of the taste of fish oil. ;)

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby Julie G » Wed May 20, 2015 9:54 am

Great find, Lilly. This looks like a really important paper for our population. I look forward to reading it later today. Thanks for sharing.
Per conversations way back, I also don't think it's as simple as supplementing fish oil which can rapidly oxidize, but importantly about consuming omega 3 as present in whole foods. That's my strategy anyway...

I totally agree with using food as opposed to supplements to raise omega 3, but I wanted to address the idea of fish oil rapidly oxidizing. I assume you meant after consumption in E4 carriers? That's been the long held understanding in the scientific community as a possible explanation for WHY we don't seem to benefit, but newer research is shaking that up a little. Apparently, we preferentially uptake DHA- actually metabolize it much more rapidly- than other apoE genotypes where it is highly conserved.

Fatty Acid Metabolism in Carriers of Apolipoprotein E Epsilon 4 Allele: Is It Contributing to Higher Risk of Cognitive Decline and Coronary Heart Disease?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210928/

Tip: As you read this paper bear in mind that: β-oxidation is NOT the same as lipid peroxidation. β-oxidation (beta-oxidation) is the catabolic process in which fatty acids are used by the body as a source of energy. Lipid peroxidation refers to the oxidative degradation of lipids.
1. In this paper, we highlighted that people carrying at least one allele of APOE4 seems to have a deregulated fatty acid metabolism with emphasis on disrupted DHA homeostasis. To date, it is not clear how this could play a role in the risk of developing LOAD and/or CHD but it could involve the following processes.

2. Shift in fatty acid selection for β-oxidation where DHA becomes highly β-oxidized in APOE4 carriers whereas in the non-carriers, DHA is highly conserved. In APOE4 carriers, brain uptake of DHA seems lower resulting in lower brain membrane DHA over time. This could play a role in neurotransmission and expression of genes and proteins involved in brain health but this needs further investigation.

3. APOE4 carriers respond differently than non-carriers to dietary interventions involving lipids such that modulating lipoprotein levels may include managing fatty acid circulating in the blood. Providing higher doses of LC omega-3 to this population could be necessary to obtain a similar response compared to the non-carriers supplemented with lower doses of LC omega-3.

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby apod » Wed May 20, 2015 10:17 am

SusanJ wrote:If you do supplement, buy quality products from a reputable source to minimize your chances of rancid products. I use Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega. Others can pitch in with their favorites.
Lately, I've been using liquid NutraSea from Ascenta Health in Canada at just a tsp a day when I'm not eating seafood and my diet ends up at a sub 3:1 omega-6:omega-3 ratio (although, I might take a break for a while once I finish the bottle, then give their plant/algae derived oil with GLA a try.) I wonder if the capsules are better from an oxidation standpoint. I like that this company uses green tea as an antioxidant (if I recall, it's superior to rosemary / vitamin e.) For each bottle, you can look up the purity of the lot (I would be curious how this compares to cooked / canned seafood.)

This is an interesting graph to keep in mind as well:
Image
1 gram of DHA has the peroxidizability of 8 grams of linoleic acid. ("This leads to the generation of free radicals and eventually to rancidity. Studies have shown that low dosages of Coenzyme Q10 reduce this oxidation, and a combination of a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and Coenzyme Q10 supplementation leads to a longer lifespan in rats.")

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby GenePoole0304 » Thu May 21, 2015 11:31 am

even with a good omega3 index according to B Sears, see his book Toxic Fat the other markers are borderline low which relates to inflammation.

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Re: RE: Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby Stavia » Thu May 21, 2015 12:00 pm

GenePoole0304 wrote:even with a good omega3 index according to B Sears, see his book Toxic Fat the other markers are borderline low which relates to inflammation.

Which markers?. Mine? Which ones specifically please Gene?
I would be grateful if you were to tell me where there are holes in my numbers.
I am travelling overseas currently and with my severe sulfite allergy my diet is very restricted and the week prior to this test I hadn't had any EVOO or avocado as I usually do and not enough nuts.

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby GenePoole0304 » Thu May 21, 2015 6:52 pm

GenePoole0304 wrote:even with a good omega3 index according to B Sears, see his book Toxic Fat the other markers are borderline low which relates to inflammation.


book is worth reading... if one likes reading and getting to the facts and biomarkers.
this product he mentions in the book is now more widely available
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10535395

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Re: FYI: Omegas & Us (New Study)

Postby Stavia » Fri May 22, 2015 9:31 am

GenePoole0304 wrote:
GenePoole0304 wrote:even with a good omega3 index according to B Sears, see his book Toxic Fat the other markers are borderline low which relates to inflammation.


book is worth reading... if one likes reading and getting to the facts and biomarkers.
this product he mentions in the book is now more widely available
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10535395


Aha. Thanks Gene :)


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