Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

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Julie G
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Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby Julie G » Sun May 29, 2016 8:39 am

Having newly learned that I’m dealing with a severe case of Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/CIRS, I wanted to create a thread devoted to the subject. Evidence is converging that multiple pathogens, infections, mycotoxins, etc. play an enormous role in Alzheimer’s etiology.

Identifying and treating these underlying causes will give us the best chance of either reversing or preventing cognitive decline. Other members who’ve walked this journey before me know much more about the subject and I look forward to learning from them. I want to begin by sharing HOW to figure out if this might apply to you.

Not everyone is susceptible to this syndrome. Approximately 25% of the population is genetically prone to develop CIRS if exposed to sufficient amounts of biotoxin. Anyone who’s dealing with mast cell activation symptoms, chronic fatigue, exercise intolerance, or chronic pain should suspect CIRS. Previous DXes of MCAS, MCAD, CFS, CFIDS, FM, and MS do not rule out CIRS. In fact, they may be red flags that point to it’s likelihood. Anyone with symptoms of impaired immunity, histamine intolerance, even gluten sensitivity, may also be affected. I found this article to be a nice overview.

I just received this note from Dr. Bredesen today:
Just a brief note to let you know that it is becoming more and more clear that everyone at risk or with symptoms should have the CIRS testing (HLA-DR/DQ, C4a, TGF-beta-1, and MSH; MARCoNS cultures if possible, and VCS)—several more with E4/4 are all turning out to be positive (some who followed up from your site, when we offered that I would evaluate anyone from Muses).  As we discussed previously, the type 3 patients are mostly E3/3, and these have a typical history of cortical symptoms.  However, it is looking as if the E4/4, or potentially E4/3, have more inflammation (just as we see with the promoter targets of ApoE4) and thus have a more typical amnestic presentation, suggestive of type 1, 1.5, or 2.

The whole infection-inflammation-response-resolution process in AD  is becoming more and more clear—I believe that there are many, many people on your site who will turn out to have chronic Lyme or chronic mycotoxin exposure or a closely related problem.  If we can identify the major pathogen in each person, this will give us a whole new level of success with treatment, although of course we’ll have to restore microbiomes for people who go on antibiotics.  The current protocol does seem to help many even without antibiotics, which is exactly what is being used for many with CIRS.  

The next layer of the AD onion is being peeled back…

If you suspect you might be dealing with chronic inflammation, a good starting place would be to take a free VCS test. This eye test measures a person’s ability to distinguish light from dark – detect an “edge”. As it turns out, Biotoxins lower the available oxygen due to reduced blood flow to the optic nerves. Apparently, 92% of those afflicted will fail the VCS test. Lower oxygen to the eyes may also reduce night vision and cause increased light sensitivity.There’s a strong correlation between impaired results and CIRS. Visit this thread to learn more.

Here’s a list of the laboratory tests that Dr. Bredesen recommends to rule out CIRS:

-HLA-DR/DQ: Test Code 167120, CPT Code 81375- LabCorp
-TGF-beta-1: Test Code code 52112, CPT Code 83520- Quest
-MSH: Test Code 010421, CPT Code 83591- LabCorp
-NJC-C4a: Test Code 42658, CPT Code 86160- Quest

circular
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sun May 29, 2016 9:28 am

Thank you for this thread and background post Julie. I know this belongs on my must do list. I shutter to think of the expenses of all this unless by some miracle my new immunologist and insurance will pursue it with me. She's at least on to MCAS so maybe will be open-minded. Holy cow, I just remembered I have a card for someone in my town considered to be an expert in mold and the like! Out of insurance though, so a potentially great backup. Anyway, forget that chattiness. What must be done must be done.

I could use some clarification from someone on HLA-DR/DQ. As I understand it, HLA is the human leukocyte antigen cluster of immune related genes. Some years back I had some of this testing done through Enterolab (BTW have no idea if the science behind this lab is up to snuff). This is what came back:

    HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0603
    HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0604
    Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

I don't know if this accounts for the whole HLA-DQ gene or if there's more. It does appear I still at least need HLA-DR, and maybe the two have to be ordered/purchased together anyway.

The only thing coming up under HLA in Promethease using the version 4 23andMe data is HLA-DQB1, where I have rs9273363(C;C) and it's noted as 'good'.

I just thought I'd bring this up because others may wonder if the required HLA-DR/DQ sequencing is available through Promethease, and it doesn't appear to be at least for 23andMe version 4 chip.

Does anyone know if one of the outfits where one self orders a lab test runs them through Quest? I recently used Life Extension and they run their through LabCorp.

For the LabCorp labs Life Extension has:

HLA-DR for mold illness susceptability but not HLA-DQ
http://www.lifeextension.com/Vitamins-S ... ic-Testing

They do not carry MSH (what does this stand for?)
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sun May 29, 2016 9:46 am

Julie I'm curious what symptoms you have of CIRS. Given how I feel and how limited I am by whatever chronic inflammatory problem I have, I can't imagine traveling and keeping up with so much the way you do. I don't doubt the numbers, I was just thinking you were doing better than what having severe CIRS would suggest?
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sun May 29, 2016 9:58 am

Here's Dr. Bredesen's paper on this, just reposting for accessibility here:

'Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized - and treatable - epidemic'
http://www.impactaging.com/papers/v8/n2 ... 00896.html

Julie, also wondering what your ophthalmologist had to say about your diminished contrast sensitivity.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby Julie G » Sun May 29, 2016 10:05 am

You’ve had a part of the testing done, Circ. Quest separates out the specific subclasses, It may be cheaper to pursue continued investigation with them. Here’s a handy calculator to determine HLA Hapotype.

I feel OK, dramatically improved from when I was at my worst. I would estimate that I still operate at 70% of normal, but doing so is taking an enormous toll on my health. Traveling is very hard on me. Lack of sleep, stress, or bad diet exacerbate everything. By optimizing my biomarkers and living very cleanly, I’ve managed to bolster my innate immune system to fight. My biomarkers, however, suggest I’m essentially losing the battle with my innate immune system biomarker, IgG at 473 (Reference range: 700-1500) and CIRS biomarkers off-the-charts. My cognitive improvement has been sliding. I’m paying attention and plan to refocus on my healing. This is the wake-up call I needed.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby cdamaden » Sun May 29, 2016 2:04 pm

So I tried the VCS test. Here's the graph at the top:
Screen Shot 2016-05-29 at 12.44.53 PM.png

Overall - positive, 72%
Biotoxins - positive, 81% [columns C and D]
Nutritional deficiency - positive, below average in columns A and/or B

From the image, it looks like I got 3 out of the 4 column C/D results above the "healthy" line. I would guess that means my biotoxin situation is not too bad.

For the nutritional deficiency, my column A was in the tank but my column B wasn't too bad.

Chris Kresser has an article about CIRS:
https://chriskresser.com/5-things-you-s ... d-illness/

Thoughts?
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby buck3Maureen » Sun May 29, 2016 2:46 pm

Thank you for starting this thread Julie,
I think I am (or might be) a type 3. I have had all the testing except Marcons, C4A and VCS. I am going to do the VCS this week, but my C4A will have to wait as I am changing doctors. I think I can order the Marcons on my own. As far as I know there is no way to order this test from Quest on your own. Waiting to talk to Dr. Bredesen and I will share anything I learn.
.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sun May 29, 2016 5:22 pm

Here's a link Brian at VCS posted today in this thread viewtopic.php?p=26515#p26515:
Hi Julie, All,

Here's the discount link: https://www.vcstest.com/a/ApoE4

The link gives any user who creates an account after clicking that link a 30% discount on upgraded results and additional testing.

Please let me know if there are any questions or if there's anything I can help with, at any point.

Brian
VCSTest.com
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Sun May 29, 2016 5:41 pm

Well, I took the test and it was one of those, do I really want to look at the results moments. But, here you go.

Screen Shot 2016-05-29 at 5.21.38 PM.png


I know it's not 100%, but it appears I'm okay on this one. To be honest, when Bredesen's paper on 3 types of AD came out, I felt that I fell in the Type 2 class (in spite of my RA - never had very high inflammatory markers). I think my dad also fell in this category, which includes insulin resistance, hypovitaminosis D, hyper-homocysteinemia, and hormonal loss.

So, back to batting the homocysteine, A1c, hormones and methylation front, and taking my handful o' supplements.
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sun May 29, 2016 5:49 pm

Juliegee wrote:I feel OK, dramatically improved from when I was at my worst. I would estimate that I still operate at 70% of normal, but doing so is taking an enormous toll on my health. Traveling is very hard on me. Lack of sleep, stress, or bad diet exacerbate everything. By optimizing my biomarkers and living very cleanly, I’ve managed to bolster my innate immune system to fight. My biomarkers, however, suggest I’m essentially losing the battle with my innate immune system biomarker, IgG at 473 (Reference range: 700-1500) and CIRS biomarkers off-the-charts. My cognitive improvement has been sliding. I’m paying attention and plan to refocus on my healing. This is the wake-up call I needed.

Julie, reading this blew my heart wide open, especially that you feel your cognition is sliding. Let's get you from 'operating' at 70% to thriving without repercussions at 100% shall we? I think this new avenue holds a lot of hope for people facing issues like ours, whatever the individual specifics, here and elsewhere. I dread the expense and logistics but I feel very hopeful to have this new angle to look into. I probably would have put it off longer if you hadn't started this thread, so thanks.

By the way, I had mold in the house I lived in when the MCAS type syndrome first began. Not much, but in the cabinet beneath the kitchen sink. We were in the house for two years. I only did a half-arsed treatment on it without professional help since it wasn't too extensive. It's quite possible there was more that I didn't see. :idea:
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


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