Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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SusanJ
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:19 pm

circular wrote:I didn't know about rice in chicken. Hmmm, will have to see if there's a way to confirm chicken with lower or no arsenic?


Don't know of anyone testing. Conventional and even cage-free chickens are fed rice, so just like humans, they accumulate the arsenic. But I'd guess that free-range chicken would definitely be safer.

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TheBrain
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby TheBrain » Mon Nov 25, 2019 2:51 pm

floramaria wrote:
CoachDD wrote:I ... want to bring to your attention a publication that Shoemaker released within the past month about the urine mycotoxin testing (spoiler alert ~ he does not believe it should be used to test mycotoxins): https://www.survivingmold.com/legal-resources/dr.-shoemaker-essays/urinary-mycotoxins-a-review-of-contaminated-buildings-and-food-in-search-of-a-biomarker-separating-sick-patients-from-controls

Here is the paper: https://www.survivingmold.com/Publications/Urinary_mycotoxins_10_8_19_RS_published.pdf

And here is the summary from this paper: "Even if we are presented with impeccable lab results from ELISA and thorough use of standard differential diagnosis (we aren’t), based on world-wide control data, and a robust literature on CIRS, there is no basis to ascribe any diagnostic significance to urine mycotoxin testing."[/url]


Hi CoachDD and others following this thread. First, thank you CoachDD for this important information. After reading the summary you posted of Ritchie Shoemaker’s paper, I used your link to go to the study. It was a tough read; by the time I finished it, I felt very confused. What I took from my reading of the article was that urinary mycotoxin testing showed ingested mycotoxins, and that a high percentage of people tested for urinary mycotoxins would be positive for many because they are present in much of our food. Shoemaker made a strong case for urinary mycotoxins not correlating with CIRS, which he linked to inhaled mycotoxins. (Again, this was my interpretation though admittedly I am not a scientist and found the paper difficult.) The whole thing distressed me. Is there any value to tracking urinary mycotoxins, I wondered?

Yesterday I submitted the question to Dr Bredesen on the Apollo Health website, hoping it might be answered in the practitioner Town Hall.
I included a link to the article and asked, “Given this article, what do you think is the appropriate role of urinary testing for mycotoxins?”
Dr Bredesen replied that he is well aware of the article by Shoemaker. “However,” he replied,”Dr Neil Nathan, who is an expert in this area, supports the use of urinary mycotoxin tests, and currently there is no alternative way to identify mycotoxins.” He went on say that the tests Shoemaker recommends such as C4a are tests for inflammatory response, and don't directly test mycotoxins.” Also “The new GENIE test looks at transcriptomics, again without any direct testing for mycotoxins”. He mentions work by Thrasher et al. showing treatment and improvement was associated with reduced urinary mycotoxins. Dr Bredesen continued, “So admittedly the testing is not perfect but there is no alternative for this information currently.”

For those who were perplexed by the Shoemaker article, as I was, I hope this response from Dr Bredesen provides clarification.
I plan to pick up Dr Neil Nathan’s book!


CoachDD, thanks for posting about Shoemaker's paper and providing your interpretation. Floramaria, thanks for taking the time to dig into the paper as well and then ask Dr. Bredesen about it. For the time being at least, I'm satisfied with Dr. Bredesen's response.

In my case, if it weren't for urine mycotoxin testing, I'd have no idea that I've been a mycotoxin storage unit for many years, probably decades. I'm thankful that this test exists, and I believe I'm on the right track with the treatment I'm currently undergoing.

It seems like there's debate on just about everything!
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby CathyS » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:39 am

CathyS wrote:
Julie G wrote:Congrats on removing several of your mercury amalgams,CathyS. I couldn’t help but wonder if your increased pain might have something to do with your daily Aleve. See this. I know how difficult it is to break this pain cycle without using OTCs. Are you already using a good fish oil capsule with curcumin? Both can be very anti-inflammatory as well as upregulating glutathione, the master detoxifier, which would also provide benefit for you now. During this healing period, especially considering the likelihood of increased gut permeability, you may want to be really careful with dietary lectins and other anti-nutrients. Lastly, if the pain persists, you might even consider low dose naltrexone. Use our search to see previous discussions. Best of luck as you move forward. Please keep us posted on your progress.


Hi Julie,

Thank you very much for posting! The fish oil that I take is Carlson's Liquid fish oil. My FM provider recommended this several years ago when my triglycerides were off the charts, and the Cardiologist had only recommended fish oil capsules. The FM told me that liquid fish oil is much better for absorption. My triglycerides finally got back within normal range with 2 teaspoons each morning. The Carlson's Liquid fish oil appears not to have curcumin. While trying to treat my CIRS, I have upped the dosage to 5 teaspoons each morning (taken in a little shot glass with measurements).

I have not heard of curcumin before, and just now googling it. It looks like I could take that as a supplement and get rid of the Aleve. It says if I want anti-inflammatory effects I will need to get 500 to 1,000 milligrams of curcuminoids per day.

Thanks Julie! I need all the help I can get!


As an update for anyone fighting Both CIRS and Mercury Toxicity, I have been taking Cholestyramine since August. In early November I failed the vcstest just like previously. In early November, I started the Selenium for detoxifying Mercury. The first 3 days went fine, however after 3 days I woke up to severe joint and muscle pain, which I previously experienced from the mycotoxin illness. I stopped the Selenium.

Julie mentioned curcumin and that it could help with anti-inflammatory. I started that in November, taking 2 capsules a day, and have been able to get off the Aleve. Thanks Julie!

Over the past 2 months I have had all 8 of my amalgam fillings replaced with composites. I have been taking HM-ND by premier labs for Mercury detox.

I took the vcstest again in the end of December, and I failed and scored exactly the same as in early November. This time I was really discouraged, so I did research and found https://www.nihadc.com/assessments/visual-contrast-sensitivity-testing-vcs-test.html which states that Heavy metals such as Lead and Mercury may affect the ability to perceive contrast and convey an abnormal result. For me, this means that I will have to clear BOTH Mycotoxins and Mercury before I will be able to pass the vcstest.

I few days ago, I started taking the Selenium again for detoxifying Mercury. Monday and Tuesday were very fatigued days for me along with muscle pain. Researching yesterday, I found an article https://fatiguetoflourish.com/chronic-fatigue-symptom-of-toxic-mold/ that explains that fatigue, shortness of breath and muscle pain are caused by Low VEGF. Researching today, I found https://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/02/28/selenium-supplements-too-much-of-a-good-thing from 2012, which says that too much selenium can cause fatigue. I also found http://www.biosyntrx.com/articles.php?id=516 which states "Supplemental selenium has now been shown to down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production". Since as a CIRS patient I already have low VEGF, I will not be able to take selenium.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:20 pm

CathyS wrote:I also found http://www.biosyntrx.com/articles.php?id=516 which states "Supplemental selenium has now been shown to down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production".


Interesting read. Selenium is probably one of those not-too-little and not-too-much supplements from the looks of it. I plan to review my selenium intake because I have low VEGF, too.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby Julie G » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:10 am

Julie mentioned curcumin and that it could help with anti-inflammatory. I started that in November, taking 2 capsules a day, and have been able to get off the Aleve. Thanks Julie!

Awesome, CathyS! Alleve, aspirin, and all NSAIDs (short for Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug), can profoundly affect the gut; increasing intestinal permeability, changing the composition of the gut flora, and even causing more serious problems (like ulcers and more) with long-term use. Since learning this, nowI think long and hard before popping any painkiller and now often start with a half of a regular dose when it's absolutely necessary. I love my curcumin and still contend that it's probably one of my most effective supplements.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby NancyM » Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:45 am

Julie G wrote:
I love my curcumin and still contend that it's probably one of my most effective supplements.


I'm with you Julie. Of all the supplements I take, curcumin is the one that results in the most noticeable difference in how I feel. When I first started on this journey a few years back I was suffering from a lot of pain and within a few months of starting curcumin the pain was completely gone and has stayed that way to this day. When suffering with a headache or other acute pain (like a broken toe recently :shock: ) I pop more curcumin rather than any other type of pain meds. I swear by it. I am a true believer in its anti inflammatory properties.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby rjkmhk » Tue Jan 21, 2020 11:48 am

I'm also a great fan of curcumin...I take a teaspoon a day of powdered curcumin along with freshly ground pepper...I never felt any difference when I took capsules...I think I didn't take as much as I do now or there is a difference in the quality of curcumin...now, I won't stop taking it...it has saved my arthritic/tendonitis hands!


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