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Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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TheBrain
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby TheBrain » Fri May 18, 2018 5:17 am

Here's more information on my two haplotypes.

http://www.myhousemakesmesick.com/hlaca ... 2=17-2-52B

7-2-53 - Mold Susceptible

With regard to biotoxin susceptibility it is reported that this haplotype is statistically correlated with an increased susceptibility to biotoxins from mold1. Importantly, possessing this haplotype does not signify the presence of mold, mycotoxins or other related elements within the body nor is it an indication of past or present exposure. Rather it has been suggested that the immune system of those with this haplotype may be unable or less able to properly identify and eliminate toxins from mold2.


Disease Risk
✓ This haplotype may confer additional risk of Celiac Disease3

Disease Protection
✓ Elements of this haplotype are reported to be protective against Multiple Sclerosis4



17-2-52B - Mold Susceptible

With regard to biotoxin susceptibility it is reported that this haplotype is statistically correlated with an increased susceptibility to biotoxins from mold1. Importantly, possessing this haplotype does not signify the presence of mold, mycotoxins or other related elements within the body nor is it an indication of past or present exposure. Rather it has been suggested that the immune system of those with this haplotype may be unable or less able to properly identify and eliminate toxins from mold2.


Disease Risk
✓ Some versions of this haplotype may confer additional risk of Type 1 Diabetes5
✓ Some versions of this haplotype may confer additional risk of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus6
✓ This haplotype may confer additional risk of Celiac Disease3
✓ This haplotype may confer additional risk of Sjorgen's Syndrome7
✓ This haplotype may confer additional risk of Addison's Disease8
✓ Elements of this haplotype may confer additional risk of Multiple Sclerosis4


References
1. Surviving Mold, by Ritchie C. Shoemaker
2. The Genetics of Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome from Biotoxins, by Dr. David Ou - http://www.drdaveou.com/blog/?p=406
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24628273
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21440682
5. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/57/4/1084
6. http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v15/ ... 1827a.html
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11469461
8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/11836294
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Julie G
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby Julie G » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:52 pm

Apologies if this has previously been discussed, but Dr. Bredesen just sent me a copy of Toxic: Heal your body from mold toxicity, Lyme disease, multiple chemical sensitivities, and chronic environmental illness by Neil Nathan, MD. I literally can't put it down. For anyone dealing with these issues (all of which contribute to AD), I can't recommend this book highly enough. I literally can't put it down. It's another validation of my journey... and an action plan for all of the work that I have left to do.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby Chameleon » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:57 pm

I have been reading this for awhile and I think it is a great book and I have read many mold books.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby CoachDD » Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:43 pm

PRICE DROP ALERT: Toxic, Dr. Neil Nathan's book. . .the Kindle edition is currently 67% off at $9.99!!
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circular
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sat Dec 15, 2018 8:05 pm

CoachDD wrote:PRICE DROP ALERT: Toxic, Dr. Neil Nathan's book. . .the Kindle edition is currently 67% off at $9.99!!

Thanks I've just ordered it, so it's joining all the other Kindle books I can't find time to read :D I'm dreaming that the Amazon page count for it is correct: 26 (???) ... must be a typo.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby slacker » Sun Dec 16, 2018 5:03 am

Yes the 26 pages is a typo! I had the same thought myself, so looked at the page count for the paper book. I haven't ordered either yet, but intend to do so.
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SusanJ
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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Fri Sep 27, 2019 2:33 pm

Just spent the day reading through this thread a little more carefully. I have my test results back from my new doctor (Dr. Craig Tanio), they point to CIRS of some sort, and headed off to do more testing next week.

Just a little background first. The last 2 years I've been getting slightly more problems with my joints, both swelling and pain. And some word issues, not serious, but those I can't quite grab that word moments. Cleaning up my life around the usual suspects didn't do too much good. Then I moved to Florida, and well, things are going down hill even more. Part of it is stress I know.

Here are the initial results. It's long, but you inquiring CIRS types will want to know.

NeuroQuant
My hippocampus looks great. My white matter is elevated, which Tanio believes is related to chronic inflammation. (More on that inflammation thing in a minute). I also have a somewhat elevated amygdala volume (yes, it correlates with ACEs).

Lyme is listed as positive but the IgG Alt results are “equivocal”, which means not sure. Never remember being bitten by a tick, and Lyme is not usually an issue in Colorado where I spent most of my life. So, we're waiting and watching this one.

Metals
Arsenic high, and yes, I eat chicken & some rice. Tanio says supporting detox system will help, but I'm cutting both back at the moment.
Mercury is a bit high. Time to ditch all tuna and watch my intake of other fish like cod (yep, it's in the same range as light canned tuna).
And I need to increase zinc during detox.

Great Plains Toxin test says that chemicals all look okay.

Cyrex 5
Tropomyosin and Phospholipid equivocal - tropomyosin suggests gut issues. Phosopholipid, if high can lead to blood clots. Highest values are caused by diabetes and lupis. Mine is perhaps other root causes.
Alpha and beta tubular is out of range - means some sort of infectious or toxic exposure. He wants to watch if this goes down by treating viruses (more on this). This helps to connect the increased amount of white matter to underlying inflammation.
Everything else, normal.

TGF-b1 elevated at 7780 (reference range is 344-2382 pg/mL). Tanio says this is a nonspecific marker for mold or other infectious process. High means it’s trying to boost Treg cells.

C4a is in the low reference range at 634 (reference range 0-2830 ng/mL)

Viral and CIRS tests
CMV antibody way out of range, for both IgG 9.2 U.mL (> .70 is positive) and IgM 41.80 AU/mL (> 35 antibody detected). This is related to Herpes viruses, and IgM is suggestive of recent infection. (Am getting further, more sensitive test, more later.) Herpes also has a strong link to white matter issues. And, shingles is a herpes virus, of which I had a small outbreak about a year ago.

HSV -1 or -2 negative (good!)

EBV is really high, suggests past infection, but he wants to test further to rule out current activity. IgM < 36.0 (Negative) but IgG
VCA is 315 U/mL (>21.99 is positive) and EBNA is 486 U/mL (>21.99 is positive).

VEGF <31 (Low) (As circ mentioned in one of her posts, Ackerly says that viruses can lower this.)

MMP-9 is low at 222 (reference range 0-900), which is good.

Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (alpha MSH) is low at 14.2 (reference range is 0-100)

HSV-6 IgG is high, but could be related to other viral infections

Lipid panel looks fine except for LDL particle #, but feels treating inflammation will lower this.

Osmolality 294 (in normal range)

Tryptase 2.8 mcg/L (no mastocytosis)

Oral DNA, one of the best results he’s ever seen. Gives me a B+. Have one bacteria, Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodontium, present, but below treatment levels.

MARCoNS positive. Staph Coag Negative-large amount. He didn’t seem too concerned, saying that there is 10-20% colonization in healthy people. But, I'm using a nasal irrigator and will add 2 pumps of biocidin.

So, after some discussion, we zoned in on the viral piece of this because of the tests, and my long history of doing battles with viruses and losing. I am getting a test done by Armin labs in Germany, which he says provides a more detailed test to see what is going on with EBV, CMV and VZV (zoster).

And we're going to test my new home for mold, because, yes, it's Florida.

Will let you know how it's going, but feel free to pitch in any comments!

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby circular » Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:49 pm

SusanJ wrote:I have my test results back from my new doctor (Dr. Craig Tanio), they point to CIRS of some sort, and headed off to do more testing next week...

Isn't it fun getting to peer into one's system? But not so fun to have such a need to :roll:

Before I forget, I'm going to try the baking soda to get my hsCRP down per this thread. (Science Direct article) It showed effects after only two weeks of use. It's so cheap I think it's worth a try, especially now that my choline stores are almost certainly boosted for better acetylcholine functioning. Wouldn't it be fascinating if something so simple could help a lot of CIRS patients?

Congratulations on your hippocampus! :D What is your white matter score and which version of NeuroQuant report do you have? I'm curious to compare our white matter vis chronic inflammation. If it helps you feel better, my amygdala is in the 98%ile on the right side and 84th%ile on the left, for a total of 95. The report calls that normal, but I think it's from too much stress. I heard in a good podcast about trauma that meditation can reduce the size of the amygdala (!). Since it's quite possible that a history of trauma might predispose us to CIRS, that might be worth listening to for some new ideas.

You've tested more than I have here, but we're quite similar. Here are some comparisons if it helps ...

lyme (borderline check)
TGF-b1 (a bit different, normal at 2430 but I think Shoemaker likes it lower?)
C4a (don't have it handy but not off the charts)
high CMV (check for IgG but not IgM)
negative EBV IgM (check)
high EBV VCA IgG (check at 110 ... yours is very high!)
high EBNA (check at 136 ... yours if very high)
high HHV-6 [is that what your 'HSV-6' is?] (check at 69.35)
low VEGF (check at 23)
low/normal MMP-9 (check at 231)
normal osmolality (check at 276)
positive MARCoNS (check for Staph Coag Negative-large amount)

I was pretty aggressive with the MARCoNS, at least two maybe three rounds of nasal antibiotics. It just kept uncovering one thing after another there and we didn't want to keep using the antibiotics. I also tried silver. I think the first round of abx may have been useful. Given the proximity of the sinuses to the brain, you might consider being a little more aggressive here, but if you have clear sinus symptoms, then if Biocidin helps them maybe that's all you need to go on.

For some perspective on the EBV, I'm going to copy here some notes I sent a friend once:
Here are my 2/17 results on the heels of years of chronic fatigue, with notes from one of the lab sites and Mayo: … 

EBV Ab VCA, IgM = “If positive means a recent infection”, mine was normal <36 … 

EBV Early Antigen Ab, IgG = “Hepatitis A, Hepatitis C and HIV antibodies may cross react with this assay” and Mayo says actively replicating, can have “chronic active or reactivated,” mine was 68 High where negative is <9

NOTE the last two … I guess I had reactivation but not a recent infection, if the first two can really tease that out?

EBV Ab VCA, IgG = “Greater than 90% of the normal population sees this,” mine was 110 High where negative is <18

EBV Nuclear Antigen Ab, IgG = “Detectable for life; 90% of the normal population sees this,” mine was 136 High where negative is <18

Here’s the CDC page on this https://www.cdc.gov/epstein-barr/labora ... sting.html. I think the upshot for me is that I clearly had had EBV at some point, but it couldn’t be proven by labs whether I was active (chronic or reactivated) during my chronic illness years, because the CDC says: “Early antigen (EA)

Anti-EA IgG appears in the acute phase of illness and generally falls to undetectable levels after three to six months. *In many people, detection of antibody to EA is a sign of active infection. However, 20% of healthy people may have antibodies against EA for years.”*


I was also positive for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) but that could indicate past infection. I had some high Coxsackie ones too. Then I had high HHV 6 IgG Antibodies, but my notes there say “detection of IgG antibody in midlife population approaches 100%” (Mayo). HHV is now linked with Alzheimer’s along with other viruses and pathogenic organisms. I’m not sure the labs add much, when we all just need to detox like hell and and adopt an anti-viral and immune regulation supporting lifestyle … whatever that is!

My friend was conveying that a doctor told her that EBV may lead to autoimmune conditions in some, so I found this:
Here’s how EBV > autoimmune is supposed to work. Interestingly it also says that most people have fended off EBV and people other than teens and young adults may only have had mild symptoms. That supports that EBV Ab VCA, IgG and EBV Nuclear Antigen Ab, IgG would be high in 90% of the population.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Sat Sep 28, 2019 6:53 pm

circular wrote:EBV Nuclear Antigen Ab, IgG = “Detectable for life; 90% of the normal population sees this...


Yep, I've been reading that most people have the antibodies, but not everyone gets mono or symptoms (I had mono in college).

circular wrote:I’m not sure the labs add much, when we all just need to detox like hell and and adopt an anti-viral and immune regulation supporting lifestyle … whatever that is!


Probably a lot of truth in that! Thanks for the info.

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Re: Chronic Inflammation as a contributor to Alzheimer’s

Postby SusanJ » Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:36 am

circular wrote:I was pretty aggressive with the MARCoNS, at least two maybe three rounds of nasal antibiotics.


Just curious, did you notice any overall improvements to your sinuses, or overall health with the MARCoNS work?


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