EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

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SoccerMom
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EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby SoccerMom » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:15 am

I saw this on Facebook and wondered if anyone has tried this? After reading about gluten and lectin sensitivities and how they can be inflammatory, I am curious about this test. Would this help me to know whether we should avoid certain foods? I am eating much cleaner since reading "The End of Alzheimer's", but haven't completely eliminated gluten (or lectins) since it doesn't seem to affect me.

Here is a link to the website
https://www.everlywell.com/products/food-sensitivity/

Thanks,
Soccer Mom (APOe3/4)

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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby jolicoeur » Thu Dec 21, 2017 8:13 am

Hi SoccerMom

I personally will do a sensitivity test in January. I want to know which foods could give me inflammation without knowing it.
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drae
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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby drae » Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:06 am

If memory serves... =)

My mother had severe asthma brought on by allergies, and, I feel certain, sensitivities, mostly to foods. She was given 6 months to 2 years to live in 1965.

She learned from a doctor that if she was feeling well when she woke up she could get up calmly, sit down, take a resting pulse, eat a small portion of some food she wanted to taste, wait resting 20 minutes without eating or moving around, maybe sit reading, then take her resting pulse again. If it had gone up 20 or more beats per minute after 20 minutes she had discovered another culprit and from then on would avoid that food.

She is now 94 and her asthma has been under control for decades. Of course, testing 96 substances at once is quicker. In that decade, saving money if possible was the norm and allergy tests were pretty radical.

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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby KarenS » Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:19 pm

My husband hasn't been diagnosed with IBS, but he must at least have leaky gut - he probably hasn't had a solid bowel movement in the 30 years I've known him. He has been doing the ketogenic thing with me since after Thanksgiving and we figured the elimination of gluten and dairy would fix him up, but it didn't. Our doctor ordered a 96-food sensitivity test from Alletess and the results were very surprising. He is sensitive to dairy, but not gluten - and in fact is sensitive to a lot of things we eat frequently, like chicken, almonds, lemons, and sweet potatoes! (We just got the results back last week so there hasn't been time to see how the elimination of those items affects him.) So I would think such a test might be helpful to you, since so many other things haven't worked.

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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby Jan » Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:44 pm

Hi, KarenS, welcome. Glad to have you on the Forum. Congratulations to you and your husband for addressing health issues. I hope that the food sensitivity results enable him to make significant progress. We'd love to hear more about you, and welcome you to introduce yourself (and your husband, if you'd like), in the Our Stories forum, which can be found here: viewforum.php?f=2
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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby JML » Sun Mar 04, 2018 7:47 pm

SoccerMom wrote:I saw this on Facebook and wondered if anyone has tried this?


Hi SoccerMom,

There are several different companies that offer food sensitivity (delayed immune reaction) testing. I just recently did the ELISA/ACT test (it requires a blood draw). My doctor recommended it over several of the others and said that he thought there were fewer "false positives" with this one. Something about results being read by a human instead of just a computer. I have no idea if this is true. They have different packages depending on what and how many substances you want to test. I only tested for food and food additives. Out of 281 items tested, I had a strong reaction to 3 and a moderate reaction to 12. Several of these have been migraine triggers for me in the past, so not a surprise. Some were complete surprises and I am mourning having to give them up for several months :| (I'm finding it tough to be on a ketogenic, dairy-free and grain-free diet without eggs and vanilla! Who knew?)
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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby SusanJ » Mon Mar 05, 2018 6:43 am

KarenS wrote:...is sensitive to a lot of things we eat frequently, like chicken, almonds, lemons, and sweet potatoes!


When I did a test like this, my former FM doc said that several low level sensitivities, and especially to foods you eat everyday, are common with leaky gut. It means you have to heal the leaky gut, but not necessarily avoid those foods forever. IMHO, that's where you need to start, because if you don't heal the leaky gut, he'll just start reacting to the next set of food you settle on to eat. It's a common problem with leaky gut.

The other thing that might help is to rotate food while healing. About 7 years ago I started with eliminating common allergens (the top 8 as they are called) then did a full rotation diet. If I ate chicken (or related foods like eggs or turkey) on Monday night, I didn't eat it again until Friday night. It's called a 4-day rotation and helps the body not see food as an enemy because there is time in between exposures. If you're eating something everyday with a leaky gut, the body thinks "Sound the alarm!" because it is seeing the same protein signature everyday. To the immune system, it is no different than a bacterial infection that doesn't go away.

I focused on rotating proteins (animal, fish, nuts) but a full-on version also does fruits and vegetables. If you eat other high-protein foods like beans, corn or legumes, I'd rotate those, too. You can google "rotation diet" to see ways to implement it. It does take a bit of menu planning to pull it off successfully, but I found it immensely helpful.

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Re: EveryWell Food Sensitivity test

Postby KarenS » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:19 pm

SusanJ wrote:The other thing that might help is to rotate food while healing.


Thank you SusanJ, that's very helpful!


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