Ketosis and PPAR alpha rs1800206(C;G)

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Re: Ketosis and PPAR alpha rs1800206(C;G)

Postby Maryann » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:00 pm

viaswiss wrote:Currently I am just making sure to eat only slow digesting carbs and take my fish oil and olive oil, its what seems to work best for me at least body composition wise. I plan to follow this thread though to figure out what is best for us.

Hello viaswiss,
Welcome to the website. Eating slowly is the best place to start as all digestion starts there. There is so much you can learn on this site. Have you found the Primer? It was written by an MD who is part of the team here. You can also use the search engine Wiki , which is found by clicking the 3 dots to the right go your name.
Feel free to tell us more about you in Our Stories ( found under Board index)

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Re: Ketosis and PPAR alpha rs1800206(C;G)

Postby Tincup » Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:26 pm

A quick note on testing for ketones. The breath meter tests for acetone, the urine tests for acetoacetate and the blood meter tests for betahydroxybuterate. Hence they may not correlate well. Acetoacetate is made by the liver and acetone is a byproduct, by my understanding. Hence the breath meter may be considered a "real time" reading on production. As the urine strips measure EXCESS acetoacetate, these can measure a low or zero value and you could still be in ketosis. Especially after you've been ketotic for a while the body gets better at using the acetoacetate and not excreting it. The betahydroxybuterate is considered a "storage form," hence it may increase as you make ketones if the production exceeds usage. There is a graph I posted here some time ago from the inventor of the Ketonix that shows this relationship between serum and breath ketones. Links 1

Also this visual (not audio) presentation by the founder of Ketonix here.

I've used all three at the same time and at high ketone levels (say >4 or 5 mmol/L) everything reads high for me.
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Re: Ketosis and PPAR alpha rs1800206(C;G)

Postby cdamaden » Sat Aug 25, 2018 6:35 pm

viaswiss wrote:I also have the PPAR-a polymorphism and it makes me wonder if intermittant fasting or ketosis is worth it.


There's an interesting speculative discussion on the Pete Attia's podcast wtih Rhonda Patrick. They discuss PPAR alpha and gamma. Then they go on to discuss saturated fats. PPAR alpha folks should strive for a higher ratio of monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats to saturated fats, in particular if they intend to fast or go into ketosis. Peter has seen a pattern where there is a subset of people (10-20%) on a ketogenic diet who have problems, in particular LDL-P goes way up and inflammation markers go up. Those people are making much more cholesterol, he says. He goes on to wonder if this subset is the same as the people who have PPAR alpha (G allele) . They discussed that there are other SNPs (e.g. FTO) that could be responsible. Rhonda went on to say that people with these SNPs who eat a diet higher in saturated fat than mono+PUFAs have higher inflammation, higher oxLDL, higher sdLDL, and other such markers. Prevalence is probably less than 20%.
https://peterattiamd.com/rhondapatrick/

I can say that as I worked through a Paleo diet, I ramped up my saturated fat intake (e.g. cooked with bacon grease) and my total cholesterol measurements went up from about 175 to 250, with LDL being the big increase but HDL went up too. When I took my first True Health Diagnostics (THD) test that included the advanced markers, where I unexpectedly learned about my APOE status, it showed my LDL-P at 1905 and sdLDL at 44. So I cut my saturated fat back and my next LDL-P was at 1529 while my total cholesterol dropped to 205 and sdLDL to 28. Recently I had another test and the sdLDL had dropped to 26 (unfortunately, I didn't get any other lipid markers).

I'd be interested if others seem to be hyper-responders to saturated fat and their PPAR-alpha status. I am rs1800206 (C;G).
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Re: Ketosis and PPAR alpha rs1800206(C;G)

Postby Tincup » Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:15 pm

cdamaden wrote:I'd be interested if others seem to be hyper-responders to saturated fat and their PPAR-alpha status. I am rs1800206 (C;G).


I'm C:C as is my 4/4 wife.

Sat fat will spike my lipids, but not inflammatory markers. We do eat per Gundry instructions, so we limit animal/fish to omega 3 eggs (or pastured), white fish & shell fish. Most of our fat is mono. Fasting will also spike lipids, but not sdLDL-c. Our latest test - which we'll post once the transcript is finished by my wife, I was about 15 hours fasted and I'd not eaten a lot when I did eat that day. So my lipids were higher than when I do eat a full meal the night before. I'm not a super hyper responder like Dave Feldman, but both my wife and I will see elevations. I know Peter Attia cares, I don't (nor does Gundry) as long as the sdLDL-c and oxLDL are fine. Her's will spike a little more than mine. Maybe a 3/4 vs 4/4 issue?
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