SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

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KatieS
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SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby KatieS » Wed May 14, 2014 12:34 pm


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LillyBritches
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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby LillyBritches » Wed May 14, 2014 2:18 pm

Hi, Kit! Thanks...and that's excellent news. I've been on an SSRI (Lexapro) since 2007. I don't have depression, but I do have Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). It seriously helps with that.

I was actually thinking of weaning from it last year, then did my homework re its potential neuroprotective properties...so I stayed on. I even know someone (another 4/4 female) who actually began Lexapro last year after she read extensively about its potential AD prevention.
I'm just a oily slick in a windup world with a nervous tick.

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby Gina99 » Wed May 14, 2014 3:00 pm

I was on that for a while but I got to complacent about everything. It was like "the house is burning down" and I would be like "i dont care". Remniscent of the 60's. So now I am wondering if it is just certain anti-depressants or all. Have you read anything Lilly ?


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KatieS
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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby KatieS » Wed May 14, 2014 4:22 pm

This Penn study used Celexa on mice and 13 humans, age 18- 50 (genetically at risk for early AD?) At this point, I would only use Celexa is I had other reasons to justify. But as AD prevention drugs, it is very interesting, underscoring that dopamine/seratonin connection that we have been discussing.

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby SpunkyPup » Wed May 14, 2014 5:55 pm

who would want the brain fog and other side affects of those drugs..

better take magnesium which is lacking in most people with depression and the population and do other things.

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LillyBritches
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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby LillyBritches » Thu May 15, 2014 3:49 pm

Gina - lol - I don't mean to laugh...but that was funny. :D Been there, felt that way...on Lexapro 20 mg. I'm on 10 mg now. Here's the bizarre thing (to me, at least): I was anorexic for two-three months when I initially began Lexapro. I mean, almost completely lost my appetite and I had to force myself to eat. That never, ever happens to me unless I have a norovirus. lol

I lost a needed 30ish lbs. during that time; however, as soon as my appetite returned, so did the tonnage.

My doctors told me that anorexia can occur, but that it's rare, and that it's usually the opposite. People gain initially.

Spunky - brain fog? lol Nope. Of course, everyone's electricity and biochemistry is unique, but Lexapro's impact on my brain was quite the opposite for me. It definitely took a huge edge off my anxiety and worry and, other than the slight apathy I felt on 20 mg, it didn't foster any emotional flatlining.

The other 4/4 woman I know who began Lexapro strictly as a potential neuroprotective preventative did so only after talking to a top neurologist about her situation. He didn't hesitate to agree with her.

Kit - Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) is a second-generation SSRI:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15131491

and Celexa (citalopram hydrobromide) is its precusor:

http://pro.psychcentral.com/2013/lexapr ... 01534.html

It's more potent and cleaner than Celexa and works much better for most re depression and/or anxiety. Lexapro is an updated formula for Celexa. I've read studies/clinical trials re Lexapro offering protection against, and/or the potential to delay, Alzheimer's...but can't find them now...and I have too many bookmarks and too little time. lol
I'm just a oily slick in a windup world with a nervous tick.

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby SpunkyPup » Fri May 16, 2014 2:06 pm

doc gave me anti depressant low dose for migraine but after 2 days I felt so lousy couldn't do nothing so I stopped, it is supposed to take a week to get used to.
They are just experimenting with them not treating the source of the problem. Ever see this guys orders tests nope! All driven by pharma lobbying to protect their monopoly.

Just about all psychiatry is pseudo science along with neuro science.

what this study is really pointing to is to correct the serotonin pathway at source. Two ways one is methylation and the other gut health and keep smiling or meditating or whatever you do to be happy.
ok i'm off my rocking horse for now and drinking fresh flown over from china long jin green tea with a fruity nutty flavor @ $60 /50g getting high after blasting the body out at the gym.

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby asiagillett » Tue Jun 17, 2014 11:21 am

Lilly,
Hi I'm new to this. Some might recall some of my 23andme posts. So nice to come across some of these issues I've had so many questions about. So funny history on me....I found out I am a 4/4 after my therapist recommended I take the 23andme test to prove how "healthy" I am. For the last year I have been battling severe anxiety over my health (hypochondria). It started after my last son was born 6 weeks early, crazy pregnancy hormones I think. Anyway, needless to say the test backfired on my therapist. My GP has been trying to put me on Lexapro for a year. I have been resistant b/c of side effects. I am also married to a chiropractor and we live a pretty holistic/hippy lifestyle. Taking Advil for us is a challenge, let alone a SSRI. With that said and all of this info pointing to them helping us, I am more open to it.

I thought I was out of the initial shock phase of this but the anxiety is starting to creep back in. I'm already doubting my cognitive abilities, I'm 39 for goodness sake!!! Lexapro is something I'm leaning to as well b/c since learning this I feel I'm on the crazy train express and I gave up wine, so what's a girl to do??? So happy to hear other experiences.
Asia

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby Gina99 » Tue Jun 17, 2014 12:58 pm

Ah Asia, you are in the 'I feel crazy' years. I had that, it went away. I had a brain fog beyond description. Doctor didn't know what to do with me, so she didn't do anything. And it went away. Hard not to be a hypo when you read everything surrounding AD. Step back a few, and enjoy life... ;)

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Re: SSRIs might decrease amyloid plaques

Postby asiagillett » Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:21 pm

Thank you so much for that!!! Glad to know this is a common response for others and I am hoping it fades. With all the supplements and dietary changes I've made my husband jokes I'll outlive everyone and be old and lonely. At the end of the day we all need to come to terms with our own mortality and maybe that is my biggest challenge. I have had a little relief knowing my boys may be less effected by their 4's than if they were female. Don't know what my husband is b/c unlike me he is happy and content with what the universe throws him. :D

I've been trying yoga and starting to get into it. I've always been an A-type stresser, which I have also read is common with this gene pairing, stress and hypertension (which is highly advised to control). Curious if most of us out there are tightly wound????? Another topic perhaps? My best to you all. Not a club I would of signed up for but sooo glad to have found you.

A


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