Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
User avatar
TheBrain
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 1352
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2014 12:12 pm

Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby TheBrain » Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:36 am

https://www.geneticlifehacks.com/resili ... od-trauma/

Exposure to childhood trauma, such as exposure to abuse, violence, or repeated stress, can have a long-lasting effect. Adults who were exposed to childhood trauma have higher rates of depression, PTSD, suicide, and anxiety disorders.

The question that researchers have attempted to answer is: Why are some people resilient to childhood trauma while others have lifelong effects. Genetics are a big part of that answer.

The HPA axis (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) is thought to play an integral role in the resilience to stress. Several studies have investigated the role of the HPA axis, childhood adversity, and adult depression or anxiety. [ref] One study concluded “A history of childhood trauma has longstanding effects on adulthood cortisol responses to stress, particularly in that depressed individuals with a history of childhood trauma show blunted cortisol responses” [ref].

The HPA axis is basically the interactions and feedback loops between the brain (hypothalamus) and the pituitary and adrenal glands. It regulates things like mood, energy, body temperature, and immune function — as well as the body’s release of cortisol in response to stress.

Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) is produced in the hypothalamus, and it, in turn, activates ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone). ACTH controls the synthesis of cortisol, mineralocorticoids, and DHEA.

CRH release increases anxiety, suppresses appetite, and increases attention – just what you need when a tiger is chasing you, but not good when it is chronically a little elevated. Cortisol levels naturally rise and fall over the course of the day, in rhythm with your body’s circadian clock. When this rhythm is either out of phase or dampened, there can be a cascade of chronic effects.

CRH activates the corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor, CRHR1. There are several quite common genetic variants of CRHR 1 that have been found to interact with childhood trauma – either increasing or decreasing the likelihood of long-term effects, depending on the genotype.


...

Check your 23andMe results for rs242924 (v4):
GG: increased risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma [ref][ref]
GT: somewhat increased risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma.
TT: no increase in the risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma.

Check your 23andMe results for rs110402 (v5):
GG: increased risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma [ref][ref]
AG: somewhat increased risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma.
AA: no increase in the risk of depression, anxiety due to childhood trauma.


Surprise, surprise. I'm GG on rs242924. Fortunately, herbal adaptogens have been shown to modulate the body’s stress response system, including CRH.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

Starfish77
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 397
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 4:36 pm
Location: San Francisco,CA

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby Starfish77 » Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:01 pm

Resilience Genetic varients:
I looked up my results on 23and me. I'm rs242924 G/T rs110402 A/A what does the (v4) (v5) stand for? I assume it is version but I don't know what it refers to or where to look it up.
Thanks,
Starfish

User avatar
ru442
Mod
Mod
Posts: 705
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 8:52 am

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby ru442 » Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:04 pm

That is the chip version they used to analyze your DNA... v5 is the latest I believe.
Male 4/4 56 yrs., "Live, Laugh, Love"

User avatar
Julie G
Mod
Mod
Posts: 8522
Joined: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby Julie G » Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:44 pm

Thanks for sharing, Brain. This adds a new dimension to the work suggesting that a higher ACE (adverse Childhood Event) score predisposes us to a plethora of health issues as described in this thread. This makes sense as early trauma developmentally colors our expectation of the world at large. VERY interesting, but not surprising, that certain genes can predisposes us. I'm hetero on both SNPs.

sarahb12
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 188
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:21 pm
Location: Boise, id

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby sarahb12 » Thu Jan 03, 2019 6:40 pm

One thing we now know about early childhood trauma is that a gene upstream of BDNF (which has been described as brain miracle grow) gets turned off. http://m.nautil.us/issue/47/consciousne ... -a-disease

Many of us know that excercise can increase BDNF, but it also appears to turn the genes on that increase production. If you can't excercise, there are other countermeasures that will increase BDNF (including progesterone, I just found out).

We are also learning science backed ways to increase resiliance. This is has 4 ways.
http://go.ted.com/VE5u7A

So there are things within our power to improve our situation. Just wanted to point that out in case it was causing more stress. I'm hetero on both...

Sarah
E3/E4

Christy
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:04 am

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby Christy » Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:53 pm

How do I find this on my 23 and me?

User avatar
CarrieS
Support Team
Support Team
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:21 pm

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby CarrieS » Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:10 pm

I just read an excellent book about healing trauma. The Body Keeps Score by Bessel van der Kolk,MD. It’s about brain, mind and body in the healing of trauma.
APOe4/4
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
National Board Certified Health & Wellness Coach
Certificate for Reversing Cognitive Decline for Coaches (FMCA)
Certified Fermentationist

aphorist
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:47 am

Re: Resilience: Genetic Variants Involved in Surviving Childhood Trauma

Postby aphorist » Wed Mar 06, 2019 7:43 pm

paper located here for your reference. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19596121


Return to “Prevention and Treatment”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests