Avoid Air Pollution

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circular
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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby circular » Sun Dec 01, 2019 8:48 am

hairyfairy wrote:How can you avoid air pollution when you live in a city and moving to the country isn`t an option?

It's true we can't completely avoid it, and some less so than others. Even the country can have highly polluted air (dust, pollens, pesticides ...), while I've been in bigger cities (not of the Mexico City type) when the AQI was good. And, there have been pollutants throughout human history, it's just that there are so many more now.

But for how to avoid ...

I've mostly focused on indoor AQ at home since I can control that and spend so much time in my home. If most of your time at home is sleeping in the bedroom, that would be my first area of focus, so that a third or so of your life you are breathing clean air. People in large Asian cities have started having much more of a focus on indoor AQ monitoring and filtration than in the US. They've let their air get to such abominably toxic levels that they can't possibly ignore it, but we have an opportunity to do something sooner, while most of the country is still in denial, and hopefully keep AQ regulations in place if not enhanced.

Often the outdoor air where I live outside a smallish city is good, but today is moderate. I keep a Wynd purifier in my car cup holder and will use it with the car set to recirculate its interior air when I go out to meet some friends for breakfast.

I hate to think about this, but at least on days when there's a public health warning, it's possible some people with ApoE4 might want to wear a pollution mask. You sometimes see people wearing them in public due to one condition or another. Are we as E4s so vulnerable we should be considered one such subset that should don a filtration mask earlier than other groups? I don't know for sure, but I'm inclined to think so.

I've been considering some kind of mask for when I may need to go into stores with bad AQ. The last two days I was in a department store that pumped artificial fragrance in my face as I entered the door. I walked through a huge bath of it until I was in the center of the store. Who knows what other pollutants were in the air, plus particles from trying on some clothes etc., but yesterday morning and this morning I woke up stuffy, when normally these days I don't. So there's inflammation in my head that I've worked hard to eliminate and that I think came from simply going into a store for a short while. I'm not sure what type of mask would help in that environment. I don't want to look like I'm going in to remove asbestos, but these exposures are all cumulative over a lifetime.

I've also been contemplating flipping my days. I usually run errands late afternoon/evening, but parking lots are especially full then, and full, I imagine, of poor AQ as I must be walking through all kinds of car exhaust. The outdoor air is often also worse then than in the morning, since the warmer daytime temperatures increase pollution levels if there are any. So my plan is to shift to morning errands. This cuts into the time I have alone at home, so it's easier said than done for me.

Thank you for asking that question. I think it's just another area to develop new habits if needed and do the best we can.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby slacker » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:09 am

Some of us have bought "portable" air filters for our home that help with pollution and air borne toxins. I've got an Air IQ device GC Series that filters very small particles (down to 0.0003 microns) as well as VOCs (volatile organic compounds). I run it in the bedroom overnight only, but could certainly run it all day and move it to different rooms. The filters don't last forever and need to be replaced the more frequent the unit is run. Also, the machine is rather loud, even at lower rates of filtration/air movement. I run mine at a fan speed of 2 out of 6 levels, which creates an acceptable level of white noise for sleep.
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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby circular » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:30 am

slacker wrote:Some of us have bought "portable" air filters for our home that help with pollution and air borne toxins. I've got an Air IQ device GC Series that filters very small particles (down to 0.0003 microns) as well as VOCs (volatile organic compounds). I run it in the bedroom overnight only, but could certainly run it all day and move it to different rooms. The filters don't last forever and need to be replaced the more frequent the unit is run. Also, the machine is rather loud, even at lower rates of filtration/air movement. I run mine at a fan speed of 2 out of 6 levels, which creates an acceptable level of white noise for sleep.

Good reminder of these different models. Essentially the HealthPro Plus filter more of the particles down to .0003 but less of the VOCs, while the GC series tackles more VOCs but filters fewer (though still a lot!) of particles down to .0003. Then there is Air Doctor Pro that Mark Hyman recommends, also mentioned in this thread, and Molekule which has come out and Dave Asprey recommends. AllergyBuyersClub.com has lots of products and reviews, and you can get a small 4% discount if you use Rakutan in your browser, and their 25% off Black Friday sale may or may not apply to what someone may want. They sell IQAir and Air Doctor but not Molekule.

There are a number of variables to digest, not least of which is matching the filter to the size of the room you want to clear and how often you want the air recycled. I got the compact version of the IQAir HealthProPlus, not fully understanding that it cycles a room's air a little slower than the non compact version, but it still cycles all the air in my bedroom every 2+ hours at the 2 setting, which like Slacker I use for sleep.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby circular » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:42 am

None of the three models just mentioned emit ozone like many other air filters do.

Molekule Black Friday sale

Huge discount on Air Doctor through Mark Hyman's 'community' link. Scroll down this page for a somewhat helpful chart comparing some of the major filters, and if you want Air Doctor for much less than competitors, then continue down to 'Order Now'

I think the least clear matter is a good comparison of how much VOC each reduces, except that Slacker's IQAir GC is probably the best for that. I personally feel that, if possible, using a AQ monitor in the home that tracks VOCs and particulates to best determine your needs would be a prudent way to help pick which filter to use, and maybe after removing all possible VOC emitters and continuing monitoring to see what impact that has on VOCs.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby circular » Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:40 am

circular wrote:I hate to think about this, but at least on days when there's a public health warning, it's possible some people with ApoE4 might want to wear a pollution mask. You sometimes see people wearing them in public due to one condition or another. Are we as E4s so vulnerable we should be considered one such subset that should don a filtration mask earlier than other groups? I don't know for sure, but I'm inclined to think so.

I had another look at masks and respirators for purchase online pending a trip to a city that can be more polluted than where I live.

I came across a distinction between 'mask' and 'respirator' that I was unaware of. It appears that what we would use is a 'respirator', so steer clear of pollution 'masks' online. According to 3M who makes many different types:
An important note: Respirators filter particulates and must be properly fitted; masks* fit loosely and only help guard against particles expelled from the wearer such as spit and mucus; Respirators protect you, while dust masks or surgical masks protect others (* = such as dust masks, antiviral masks or surgical masks without N95 approval)[Emphasis added]

'N95' approval appears to be a key designation you want to apply to anything you buy for this purpose.

Also, a respirator that molds well around the nose would be important. According to an author of [url=Particulate matter and episodic memory decline mediated by early neuroanatomic biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease]Particulate matter and episodic memory decline mediated by early neuroanatomic biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease[/url], quoted at Being Patient:
There are a few hypotheses ... One is that not only does the particulate matter go into your lungs, but it goes into your bloodstream and reaches your brain that way. When we directly inhale it through our nose, it can go directly into our brain. [Emphasis added]

The quote comes from the 3M page for the 3M™ Air Pollution & Pollen Respirator, Adult Size, 2 pack

Following the 'Where To Buy' link, this respirator should be widely available in my area through Walmart, but, alas, I cannot seem to find this particular one on Walmart's website, no pun intended until I saw the pun! I'll see if I have better luck in the store.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby BrianR » Wed Dec 11, 2019 9:21 am

FWIW, here is a Consumer Reports discussion about Air Purifiers (I think it's open access): https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/air-purifiers/buying-guide/index.htm.

In their ratings, the top two air purifiers are both from Blueair

Classic 605 (rating: 88, cost $665, "Large room", predicted yearly annual cost $224)
Blue Pure 211+ (rating: 85, cost $300, "Large room", predicted yearly annual cost $192)

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby circular » Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:32 pm

BrianR wrote:FWIW, here is a Consumer Reports discussion about Air Purifiers (I think it's open access): https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/air-purifiers/buying-guide/index.htm.

In their ratings, the top two air purifiers are both from Blueair

Classic 605 (rating: 88, cost $665, "Large room", predicted yearly annual cost $224)
Blue Pure 211+ (rating: 85, cost $300, "Large room", predicted yearly annual cost $192)

Thanks! Recent too, dated in October '19. I'll put that report on my list of things to dive into. It would be interesting to see why they chose Blueair ones. I don't know anything about those. Also what they thought of IQAir HHP and Molekule that were included.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Avoid Air Pollution

Postby BrianR » Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:22 pm

circular wrote:Thanks! Recent too, dated in October '19. I'll put that report on my list of things to dive into. It would be interesting to see why they chose Blueair ones. I don't know anything about those. Also what they thought of IQAir HHP and Molekule that were included.

IQAir HealthPro Plus (rating 63, cost ~$900, "large room", predicted yearly annual cost $293)
Molekule Air (rating 20, cost $800, "small room", predicted yearly annual cost $178)

I didn't see a detailed discussion of their ratings methodology. But here's a comparison which includes one of the Blueair models, IQAir, and Molekule Air:
Screen Shot 2019-12-16 at 3.18.08 PM.png
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