Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

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NewRon
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Re: Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

Postby NewRon » Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:38 am

I know it's not going to be of much help in the cases mentioned above but just a reminder of the benefits of sulforaphane, as explored by Rhonda Patrick, especially in her interview with researcher Jed Fahey, on her website or YouTube. It's a fascinating interview and highly recommended, as it speaks to all cancers.

There is also a French supplement approved for use in some cases of prostate problems. It's called Prostophane and it's basically only sulforaphane. I'm not sure if it's available in your country, as it needs to be maintained at 4°C or less to ensure potency, so shipping could be dodgy. AFAIK, Rhonda Patrick takes 40mg of this product each day.
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Re: Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

Postby TheBrain » Fri Sep 20, 2019 8:59 am

floramaria wrote:
TheBrain wrote:I've learned that my friend isn't willing to give up drinking, nor he is willing to add any supplements or extracts to his regimen.

I am sorry to hear this. Sad for him, for his wife and for you, and his friends. I can only imagine how challenging it would have been for me if my partner had not been willing and able to make the changes that contributed to his moving through the crisis time of his diagnosis and treatment to such a positive outcome. How said it would have been for him and for the many many people who love him. We are so fortunate.

His doctors at Prostate Oncology Specialists had rarely seen anyone make much radical changes and stick with them. He not only did everything they suggested, but also devoured books on cancer cures and implemented what made sense to him, or even that didn’t make sense but was worth trying anyway. Being part of this community of health activists at ApoE4.Info who take information and act on it, I think it is easy to forget how rare that is.

That your friend is making the decisions he is making is sad, but also understandable. I feel a lot of compassion for him, confronted with the trauma of cancer metastasis and asked to make an enormous change by giving up his drinking. Decades ago, I watched as a wonderful male friend tried to stop drinking by going into a residential treatment center. I think he stayed for 6 months or so, a long time anyway. He thought he’d was fine and would stay that way outside of treatment. He was drinking again within a week of coming out. He told me he just didn’t like being the person he was without alcohol. The mechanisms underlying alcoholism for any person are profound and complex.

Confronting cancer and alcoholism at the same time would be a tall order for any mortal.

Holding you and your friend in my heart.


Thank you, floramaria. Your post helped get me in touch with my emotions, which I had fairly successfully blocked off. Yes, my friend's decisions are sad but also understandable. What your partner was willing and able to do shows what's possible, but most people simply can't or won't go there. I agree that what we do here in this community, similar to what your partner did, is rare. I wish it weren't so. But I'm glad we've found each other in this community of like-minded people.

It's intriguing to me that your friend started drinking again because he didn't like being the person he was without alcohol. I look back at my alcohol abuse in my youth, and I didn't like the person I was while drunk (and especially while blacked out!).
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Re: Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

Postby TheBrain » Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:01 am

NewRon wrote:I know it's not going to be of much help in the cases mentioned above but just a reminder of the benefits of sulforaphane, as explored by Rhonda Patrick, especially in her interview with researcher Jed Fahey, on her website or YouTube. It's a fascinating interview and highly recommended, as it speaks to all cancers.

There is also a French supplement approved for use in some cases of prostate problems. It's called Prostophane and it's basically only sulforaphane. I'm not sure if it's available in your country, as it needs to be maintained at 4°C or less to ensure potency, so shipping could be dodgy. AFAIK, Rhonda Patrick takes 40mg of this product each day.


Thanks, NewRon. This information you shared could definitely help someone else down the road.
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Re: Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

Postby slacker » Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:10 pm

TheBrain wrote:
One thing I didn't mention was that he was placed on an osteoporosis medication called Evista to increase his bone strength because the prostate cancer had metastasized to his bone. Unfortunately, he developed osteonecrosis of the jaw from this medication, and it's quite painful.


Evista is a SERM (selective estrogen receptor modulator), not a bisphosphonate, which is the kind of osteoporosis treatment that can rarely cause osteonecrosis. Not to mention that Evista is only FDA approved for post menopausal women, and only helps reduce risk of vertebral fractures. I wonder if the gentleman was on a different OP med than Evista. Either way, a poor outcome from treatment.
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Re: Any other options for prostate cancer treatment other than suppressing testosterone?

Postby TheBrain » Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:06 pm

slacker wrote:
TheBrain wrote:
One thing I didn't mention was that he was placed on an osteoporosis medication called Evista to increase his bone strength because the prostate cancer had metastasized to his bone. Unfortunately, he developed osteonecrosis of the jaw from this medication, and it's quite painful.


Evista is a SERM (selective estrogen receptor modulator), not a bisphosphonate, which is the kind of osteoporosis treatment that can rarely cause osteonecrosis. Not to mention that Evista is only FDA approved for post menopausal women, and only helps reduce risk of vertebral fractures. I wonder if the gentleman was on a different OP med than Evista. Either way, a poor outcome from treatment.


Thanks, slacker. My friend was definitely on Evista. It must have been an off-label to use it for a man. I was curious myself, so I did some poking around yesterday and found a case study of Evista (Raloxifene) causing osteonecrosis.

Mandibular Osteonecrosis Associated With Raloxifene
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29303860

Abstract
Osteonecrosis is a disease with diverse pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management. It may be associated with some medications used to treat systemic issues with bone metabolism. A few cases of jaw bone osteonecrosis have been associated with raloxifene. In this paper, the authors present a clinical report of a 64-year-old woman who presented with a necrosis foci in the right alveolar ridge of the mandible, associated with continued raloxifene use.
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