Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

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CarrieS
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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby CarrieS » Wed May 06, 2020 12:24 pm

I've been making sourdough tortillas for years using sprouted whole wheat spelt for the starter and white spelt for the dough and started making sourdough bread back in August. I experimented with organic Einkorn, Kamut, Spelt and Rye (mostly ancient grains) and have found that I still like spelt the best. Three months ago I happened upon an interview where using long fermentation to reduce the gluten to almost nothing was discussed (no, I didn't bookmark it so I can't find it) and was surprised to learn that 48 to 72 hours was the way to go. WHAT?!! I'd been using a 12 hour refrigerator ferment and was getting ready to step out of my box with a 24 hour ferment but 3 days?! I tried it and have found that 72 hours in the refrigerator really does change the dough into something extremely satisfyingly chewy and sour and will never go back.

I found this blog post that talks more about the benefits and method of the long ferment. There is a video included in this blog towards the bottom that is a good illustration of how soft the dough is compared to what we may think. Over time, I've simplified how I mix the bread, learned the feel of the dough and played with adding various ingredients (like cracked wheat, flax seeds, millet, semolina, dried fruit, etc) and have really honed in on quick and easy. I found that using a "glaslock" bowl to mix and ferment the dough in is my favorite and I bake in a dutch oven. Simplicity is key for me.

My body doesn't tolerate any of the gluten free grains (rice, buckwheat, teff, etc) and I wasn't successful in my attempts at making sourdough bread using those grains either. Since every one is bio individual, you may or may not be able to tolerate this type of bread and you may or may not be able to tolerate every grain that you try. I feel fortunate that this method has worked for me.
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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby Jan18 » Wed May 06, 2020 4:10 pm

Rosemary wrote: It was a real challenge at first backing with Einkorn. It doesn't absorb liquid as well a modern wheat, and it doesn't rise as high (lower gluten content). I can know make delicious muffins (adding yogurt helps to get a better rise). As far as making bread, it's been tough. But I haven't given up. I'm waiting for yeast to arrive in the mail to start making artisan bread with a long ferment.


Rosemary,
Have you seen the videos about baking with the Einkorn? I posted the link to one of them in my reply to Thumperama back a couple of posts.

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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby Jan18 » Wed May 06, 2020 4:19 pm

CarrieS wrote:I've been making sourdough tortillas for years using sprouted whole wheat spelt for the starter and white spelt for the dough and started making sourdough bread back in August. I experimented with organic Einkorn, Kamut, Spelt and Rye (mostly ancient grains) and have found that I still like spelt the best.


Hi Carrie!
I still have our text thread in my phone from when we spoke! :) Great to see you!

Is spelt an ancient grain? I just saw a Feb. 2020 program on exactly how they bred our wheat of today to be the wheat it is (and why) and what it does to our stomach lining over time (leaky gut which can lead to inflammatory diseases.) I am determined to be able to have bread (or tortillas like you make) but want an ancient substance like Einkorn to make it with so I don't harm my stomach any more than it might already have been.

To that end, I want to use all Einkorn (or other certified ancient grains) to make my sourdough. I appreciated the two links you just shared and read them. The video on how to make the sourdough was similar to the one I posted, though take a look at the one I posted to Thumperama, as it is a bit more detailed I believe. She has one on sourdough boules, one on sourdough loaves and one on sourdough bagels.

Have you baked sourdough rounds or loaves with ALL Einkorn? The video I posted to Thumperama and that author's other videos used all Einkorn, if I recall correctly. I noticed in the video you posted, she only used 20% Einkorn and the rest was all purpose flour. I can't do that.

Thanks!

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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby Jan18 » Wed May 06, 2020 4:36 pm

MicheleCC wrote:I don't have experience with einkorn sprouted wheat (yet!) but have recently begun researching how to use sprouted spelt flour, which is similar. I'll keep you posted on what I learn.


Michele and CarrieS,
Do you know if the Einkorn then does not harm our gut lining? That's what I got from the Feb. 2020 video that mentioned Einkorn and ancient grains, but just double-checking with you both, since you are familiar with Einkorn.

Thanks!

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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby CarrieS » Wed May 06, 2020 5:28 pm

Jan18 wrote:
CarrieS wrote:I've been making sourdough tortillas for years using sprouted whole wheat spelt for the starter and white spelt for the dough and started making sourdough bread back in August. I experimented with organic Einkorn, Kamut, Spelt and Rye (mostly ancient grains) and have found that I still like spelt the best.


Hi Carrie!
I still have our text thread in my phone from when we spoke! :) Great to see you!

Is spelt an ancient grain? I just saw a Feb. 2020 program on exactly how they bred our wheat of today to be the wheat it is (and why) and what it does to our stomach lining over time (leaky gut which can lead to inflammatory diseases.) I am determined to be able to have bread (or tortillas like you make) but want an ancient substance like Einkorn to make it with so I don't harm my stomach any more than it might already have been.

To that end, I want to use all Einkorn (or other certified ancient grains) to make my sourdough. I appreciated the two links you just shared and read them. The video on how to make the sourdough was similar to the one I posted, though take a look at the one I posted to Thumperama, as it is a bit more detailed I believe. She has one on sourdough boules, one on sourdough loaves and one on sourdough bagels.

Have you baked sourdough rounds or loaves with ALL Einkorn? The video I posted to Thumperama and that author's other videos used all Einkorn, if I recall correctly. I noticed in the video you posted, she only used 20% Einkorn and the rest was all purpose flour. I can't do that.

Thanks!


From what I've read, spelt is an ancient grain like Einkorn. It hasn't been altered like modern wheat. I too am avoiding modern wheat to keep my gut safe (and I actually do react to modern wheat). I found that spelt was easier for me to get locally and that it was more cost effective too. Sourdough is very forgiving. My typical recipe uses whole wheat spelt starter, white spelt, water and salt. I don't use all purpose flour and modify recipes by using the white spelt. The 72 hour cold ferment is what has really changed how I tolerate bread. I pull the dough out of the refrigerator after 72 hours, shape it into a ball (boule) and then put it in the hot cast iron, top with the lid and bake for 25 minutes, then 25 with the lid off. Once you get going and comfortable, it gets easier to experiment. I once had a dough that "oozed" out of the bowl into the cast iron pot so I was sure it was a total failure. Best bread ever. Once you have a sourdough starter, you can make pretty much any type of bread (bagels, etc).
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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby MicheleCC » Sat May 09, 2020 2:14 pm

Jan18 wrote:
MicheleCC wrote:I don't have experience with einkorn sprouted wheat (yet!) but have recently begun researching how to use sprouted spelt flour, which is similar. I'll keep you posted on what I learn.


Michele and CarrieS,
Do you know if the Einkorn then does not harm our gut lining? That's what I got from the Feb. 2020 video that mentioned Einkorn and ancient grains, but just double-checking with you both, since you are familiar with Einkorn.

Thanks!


My understanding is that if you have celiac disease, spelt and einkorn are off limits as they contain gluten and will damage the intestinal lining. If you are gluten-sensitive or have an auto-immune condition, you may (or may not) do fine with lower gluten, organic ancient grains, sprouted grains and sourdough. If your concern is the glycemic impact of grains, it’s best to test your blood sugars to learn how you respond. Some will say for people with digestive difficulties, eating refined rather than whole grain is easier to digest, but It’s more likely to spike blood sugar. What’s right for you is best determined by the voice of your body.

I know people who snore who stop snoring several days into doing a cleanse or hypo-allergenic diet (no wheat, dairy, eggs, soy, corn). If you are reactive to a food, it increases inflammation in your body. That may show up as congestion, fluid retention, fatigue, irregular digestion, moodiness, sore joints, unstable blood sugars, etc. if you haven't done this already, keeping a food record that includes trackIng your symptoms is one way to see if the einkorn agrees with you. Another is the pulse test—taking your pulse after eating. If you’re reactive to it, your pulse will be higher than when at rest. Here’s a link that explains it in more detail. https://drjockers.com/identifying-food-sensitivities/

These are not scientific methods, but valid data points that can help you decide what works best for you.
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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby Jan18 » Sat May 09, 2020 10:47 pm

MicheleCC wrote:My understanding is that if you have celiac disease, spelt and einkorn are off limits as they contain gluten and will damage the intestinal lining.


Thank you for the link, Michele.

I am not gluten sensitive (that I know of) and definitely don't have celiac. I did see gluten-free einkorn flours at Jovial Foods website, however.

Jovial Foods is out of the whole wheat einkorn flour right now, but when I get some and make my sourdough, I will check my glycemic level. My glucose went from somewhere in the 80's to the 90's with Whole Foods sourdough (can't remember specifics and can't look back at my original post right now) but I don't think that is bad. From what I remember reading, glucose does go up some after meals and it's only considered a "spike" if it is 30 mg/dL more or over.

I just don't want to eat any bread with today's wheat, hence my interest in using einkorn.

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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby sunrise » Wed Nov 04, 2020 10:39 am

CarrieS wrote:
Jan18 wrote:
CarrieS wrote:I've been making sourdough tortillas for years using sprouted whole wheat spelt for the starter and white spelt for the dough and started making sourdough bread back in August. I experimented with organic Einkorn, Kamut, Spelt and Rye (mostly ancient grains) and have found that I still like spelt the best.


Hi Carrie!
I still have our text thread in my phone from when we spoke! :) Great to see you!

Is spelt an ancient grain? I just saw a Feb. 2020 program on exactly how they bred our wheat of today to be the wheat it is (and why) and what it does to our stomach lining over time (leaky gut which can lead to inflammatory diseases.) I am determined to be able to have bread (or tortillas like you make) but want an ancient substance like Einkorn to make it with so I don't harm my stomach any more than it might already have been.

To that end, I want to use all Einkorn (or other certified ancient grains) to make my sourdough. I appreciated the two links you just shared and read them. The video on how to make the sourdough was similar to the one I posted, though take a look at the one I posted to Thumperama, as it is a bit more detailed I believe. She has one on sourdough boules, one on sourdough loaves and one on sourdough bagels.

Have you baked sourdough rounds or loaves with ALL Einkorn? The video I posted to Thumperama and that author's other videos used all Einkorn, if I recall correctly. I noticed in the video you posted, she only used 20% Einkorn and the rest was all purpose flour. I can't do that.

Thanks!


From what I've read, spelt is an ancient grain like Einkorn. It hasn't been altered like modern wheat. I too am avoiding modern wheat to keep my gut safe (and I actually do react to modern wheat). I found that spelt was easier for me to get locally and that it was more cost effective too. Sourdough is very forgiving. My typical recipe uses whole wheat spelt starter, white spelt, water and salt. I don't use all purpose flour and modify recipes by using the white spelt. The 72 hour cold ferment is what has really changed how I tolerate bread. I pull the dough out of the refrigerator after 72 hours, shape it into a ball (boule) and then put it in the hot cast iron, top with the lid and bake for 25 minutes, then 25 with the lid off. Once you get going and comfortable, it gets easier to experiment. I once had a dough that "oozed" out of the bowl into the cast iron pot so I was sure it was a total failure. Best bread ever. Once you have a sourdough starter, you can make pretty much any type of bread (bagels, etc).

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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby BloomAgain » Wed Nov 04, 2020 3:27 pm

sunrise wrote:From what I've read, spelt is an ancient grain like Einkorn...


Welcome to the apoe4.info site, sunrise!

Baking and ancient grains are not one of my personal areas of expertise, so I don't have anything to add to this valuable string. But I do see that this is your first post, and as an Intern for this site, I'd like to be the first to officially welcome you to this forum.

We are glad you found us and hope you find the wealth of information and support of the community helpful. Congratulations on taking the initiative to seek-out ApoE4 information -- it shows your curiosity and your bravery to explore the latest in ApoE4 information.

Since you are a new poster, I'd like to share a few links that will help you navigate this site.

How-To Get the most out of the ApoE4.info website was created to help new (and not so new) members navigate the site. This area explains how to use the quotes button so that the other member receives an email notification of your reply, how to search for topics, how to subscribe to topics of interest and more.

The PRIMER: An introduction to ApoE4, biochemistry, and possible prevention strategies is a fantastic resource, exploring areas such as the science behind the ApoE4 gene and the lifestyle factors that impact its expression.

And, we would love to know more about you and what led you to our site, we invite you to share your journey by creating a new topic in Our Stories.

Again, welcome! We are here to assist you, so please feel free to continue to post any questions or freely share your knowledge with the rest of us!

Now -- back to the topic of baking with Einkorn! :D
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Re: Einkorn Sprouted Wheat

Postby buck3Maureen » Wed Nov 04, 2020 4:28 pm

Hello,
I did not see this when it was originally posted -- I know nothing about Einkorn. However, the mention of almonds in the original post is something I have some experience with. I am vegan and gluten sensitive I love almonds and also found lots of recipes with almond flour in them for crackers, breads, muffins and cookies.

About two years ago I experienced unusual (for me) gastro problems. When they did not resolve I went to my doctor and spent hundreds of dollars on tests without an answer. Then I tried a couple different probiotics and the problem did not go away. About a month ago I decided to fork over 360 dollars for a "food sensitivity" test. It tests a delayed reaction -- I think it was Igg. Anyways the only food that I eat that popped up in the AVOID column was almonds. Stopped eating almonds and presto I'm cured. Just some information.

By the way chickpea flour is a good flour for making some baked goods.
Maureen


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