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Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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Julie G
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Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby Julie G » Sat Aug 15, 2020 8:45 am

As many of you know, Dr. Bredesen's new book, The End of Alzheimer's Program", will soon be available, 8/18. Along with his integrative physician wife, Dr. Aida Lasheen Bredesen, I was honored to help write the new book which focuses heavily on the "how-to" aspect of the protocol. A large part of this book focuses upon nutrition to both prevent and remediate cognitive decline. We recently did a Facebook live to share sneak peak of the new KetoFLEX 12/3 Brain Food Pyramid. The book takes a much deeper dive into diet and all of the lifestyle strategies that we regularly discuss. Indeed, my contributions to the book are largely a distillation of our community work. In recognition of that fact, Dr. Bredesen has dedicated the new books to our ApoE4.Info community. He recognizes that we're the original pioneers, actively working to prevent and reverse cognitive decline.

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby MiniJunkie » Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:57 pm

I'm reading the book right now. I won't lie: on the one hand, it's great to be informed about what to eat and why. On the other...the diet sounds tough to follow. Lots of oils, seeds, vegetables. Not much food that is satisfying to eat :)

I'm exaggerating, of course, it's just a bit of a shock to face such a drastic shift in diet (plus I have three kids who are not going to change to this diet).
47, married with 3 kids, mom with Alzheimer’s, and
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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby Julie G » Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:26 am

I hear you, Minijunkie. I also would have had a hard time making a major dietary shift when my son lived at home. Teens tend to have set dietary preferences, are constantly famished, have hungry friends over, etc. and ordering pizza is so easy! After my son left for school, my husband and I gradually made the shift together. We started by just eating real, whole food and tossing almost everything that came from a box, bag, carton, or can. It felt like a lot of work at first but has become pretty seamless now. Over time, we gradually shifted our macronutrient ratios to include more healthy fat. Our new way of eating is so nutrient dense and satisfying, we typically eat one big meal a day which really cuts down on kitchen labor. It also makes our mealtime feel very special— a time of coming together and celebration. In retrospect, I wish we had made the shift earlier when my son was very young so that he could have grown up learning a healthier way of eating. We're so proud that he prefers the way that we eat now and pre-orders his favorite foods every time he visits. Unfortunately, his wife isn't quite on board, but we're working on her. ;)

Tell me what part of the diet feels the most difficult for you. Is it the foods that you have to give up? I ask as there are low carb versions of almost anything now that are pretty delicious. The shift needn't be dramatic. At this point in your life, I wonder if baby steps might feel more doable?

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby Slcpoe » Thu Sep 03, 2020 3:48 pm

Julie,

Do you know if Dr. Bredesen has ever released any follow up data as to the condition of the nine clients who were able to reverse their cognitive decline using his protocol.

The study that was conducted six years ago by Dr. Bredesen was quite an eye opener and I’m curious to know how those participants have done since then.

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby lgoring » Thu Sep 03, 2020 6:16 pm

Slcpoe wrote:The study that was conducted six years ago by Dr. Bredesen was quite an eye opener and I’m curious to know how those participants have done since then.


Hi Slcpoe,

That would be interesting to find out what they have been doing since the study and how they have been. Also, welcome to the ApoE4.info forum! I saw you joined a few days ago and I wanted to take this opportunity to share some introductory information that may help you navigate the site.

The Primer was written by a physician member of the ApoE4.info community and is a introduction to the ApoE4 gene. You can access the Primer here: Primer.

I saw that you did not tag Julie in your post. Possibly why she hasn't responded to you yet. Here is a link to a page that will help you find your way around, learn how to tag people by quoting them as I have done in this post among other helpful information to know right out of the gate: How To Get The Most Out Of The ApoE4.Info Website.

A forum can also be a confusing place to find information on a specific topic. Using the Search function helps you find previous conversations or threads on topics that interest you. We encourage people to post to previous topics, even if they haven't been active for a while. It gets conversations going and often promotes new ways of looking at an issue.

In addition, you can search for a specific thread topic by clicking on the magnifying glass icon in the upper right corner of the menu bar at the top of the page. How To Search the ApoE4 Site.

If you would like to share what led you here, please tell us about your journey by posting on the Our Stories Forum.

We hope to hear your story if you wish to share it!

Best,
lgoring
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Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
Certificate for Reversing Cognitive Decline for Coaches (FMCA)

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby Julie G » Fri Sep 04, 2020 9:52 am

The study that was conducted six years ago by Dr. Bredesen was quite an eye opener and I’m curious to know how those participants have done since then.

Slcpoe, great question. I'll share what (little) I know. As you're probably aware, nine initially reversed. The tenth was a type 3 (toxic) patient who didn't. At that point Dr. Bredesen hadn't really identified nor developed a treatment plan for that sub-type. The rest are doing well as long as they stick to the protocol. One is apparently a male physician, who finds the diet restrictive and has become glycotoxic again, and is (no surprise) backsliding. He's been exploring the idea of taking rapamycin vs. doing the actual work. I'll let you know if I hear any updates. In the meantime, Dr. Bredesen has published a similar series of case studies on 100 patients and is in the midst of a clinical trial that is wrapping up by the end of this year. The first paper(s) should come out of that in early January.

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby JD2020 » Fri Sep 04, 2020 11:30 am

Julie G wrote:Tell me what part of the diet feels the most difficult for you. Is it the foods that you have to give up? I ask as there are low carb versions of almost anything now that are pretty delicious. The shift needn't be dramatic. At this point in your life, I wonder if baby steps might feel more doable?


MiniJunkie didn’t respond, but I had a similar reaction, so I offer this comment. I found the food information overwhelming. For me, I felt obsessive, like college-age food obsession, when I had the calorie count of every food, down to a cucumber, memorized.

BUT you had a choice – write a book with the hard core information that people need to make a change in the trajectory of their disease, or write a much less effective feel good book. You made the right decision. Mainstream medical has nothing to offer, and people need detailed information. I am working with this protocol because a relative is declining, I am 3/4, and I want to dodge this bullet. But without symptoms or a diagnosis, I am much less intense than I would be otherwise. Should I develop symptoms or receive the diagnosis, I will fully let go of my attachments (my huge yummy organic A2 dairy latte, homemade organic A2 yogurt, wine) and jump in with both feet.

For now, I experiment with the food plan for two days out of the week. They are not my favorite two days, but I am slowly learning. I do this so that if I receive the diagnosis, I am ready to jump in. I also do this for the sake of practicing humility. There are a couple of people in my life who start their day with diet soda and go on from there. It is frustrating for me; I want them to be healthy, and neither is. I wish they would make different choices. The two days that I practice KetoFlex remind me how difficult it is to let go of our attachments, and my frustration with both people is softened with a bit of compassion.

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby Julie G » Sun Sep 06, 2020 2:51 pm

BUT you had a choice – write a book with the hard core information that people need to make a change in the trajectory of their disease, or write a much less effective feel good book. You made the right decision. Mainstream medical has nothing to offer, and people need detailed information. I am working with this protocol because a relative is declining, I am 3/4, and I want to dodge this bullet. But without symptoms or a diagnosis, I am much less intense than I would be otherwise. Should I develop symptoms or receive the diagnosis, I will fully let go of my attachments (my huge yummy organic A2 dairy latte, homemade organic A2 yogurt, wine) and jump in with both feet.

For now, I experiment with the food plan for two days out of the week. They are not my favorite two days, but I am slowly learning. I do this so that if I receive the diagnosis, I am ready to jump in. I also do this for the sake of practicing humility. There are a couple of people in my life who start their day with diet soda and go on from there. It is frustrating for me; I want them to be healthy, and neither is. I wish they would make different choices. The two days that I practice KetoFlex remind me how difficult it is to let go of our attachments, and my frustration with both people is softened with a bit of compassion.

Thank you for your kind words, JD2020. We did make many hard choices with complete humility and acknowledgement that our recommendations are subject to change with new research. The diet practiced perfectly, which I don't do, can be restrictive. My slightly looser version (with occasional cheats) feels doable for the long haul. Depending upon your age and risk level, your current plan may be perfect for now.

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby MiniJunkie » Tue Sep 08, 2020 10:32 pm

Julie G wrote:I hear you, Minijunkie. I also would have had a hard time making a major dietary shift when my son lived at home. Teens tend to have set dietary preferences, are constantly famished, have hungry friends over, etc. and ordering pizza is so easy! After my son left for school, my husband and I gradually made the shift together. We started by just eating real, whole food and tossing almost everything that came from a box, bag, carton, or can. It felt like a lot of work at first but has become pretty seamless now. Over time, we gradually shifted our macronutrient ratios to include more healthy fat. Our new way of eating is so nutrient dense and satisfying, we typically eat one big meal a day which really cuts down on kitchen labor. It also makes our mealtime feel very special— a time of coming together and celebration. In retrospect, I wish we had made the shift earlier when my son was very young so that he could have grown up learning a healthier way of eating. We're so proud that he prefers the way that we eat now and pre-orders his favorite foods every time he visits. Unfortunately, his wife isn't quite on board, but we're working on her. ;)

Tell me what part of the diet feels the most difficult for you. Is it the foods that you have to give up? I ask as there are low carb versions of almost anything now that are pretty delicious. The shift needn't be dramatic. At this point in your life, I wonder if baby steps might feel more doable?


Hi Julie, I missed the fact you had replied somehow - just seeing it now.

So, despite my initial grumbling, I'm trying to adopt the dietary and supplemental recommendations. I'm trying to do Keto (which I believe maps well to your recommendations ? And ketones are superior brain fuel?), and I've added MCT oil and Tumeric/curcumin. I feel great so far and honestly, it could be placebo effect but I do feel mentally sharper and clearer. The only downside (other than my family having to put up with me eating differently from them) is I also want to follow the plan for good sleep, and I'm finding low carbs = hard to fall asleep at night.
47, married with 3 kids, mom with Alzheimer’s, and
I am 4/4

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Re: Sneak Preview of Dr. Bredesen's new Brain Food Pyramid

Postby SusanJ » Wed Sep 09, 2020 6:06 am

MiniJunkie wrote:I also want to follow the plan for good sleep, and I'm finding low carbs = hard to fall asleep at night.


My best guess is that you need tryptophan to make serotonin and make yourself sleepy. By cutting carbs, you have cut out a major source of your tryptophan. (Think Thanksgiving dinner - it's not the turkey that makes you sleepy, it's all the carbs, because the tryptophan in protein is not well absorbed.)

Ben Lynch suggests in Dirty Genes that adding foods higher in tryptophan, including spinach, seaweed, mushrooms, pumpkin seeds, red lettuce and asparagus, will help. All low carb options. If you did a salad at night and threw some of these on, it might help. Or try half a sweet potato if it doesn't mess with you blood sugar or put you too far over your carb limit for the day.

You might also need to look at stress or underlying inflammation, which shunts tryptophan into a different pathway. (Think about how we crave carbs when we're stressed.)

Diet is a hard change, so keep experiementing and let us know how it goes!


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