Need input into my lipids please

Newcomer introductions, personal anecdotes, caregiver issues, lab results, and n=1 experimentation.
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Stavia
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Stavia » Sun Mar 22, 2015 4:19 pm

ok have my apoliprotein b back.
its 107.
65th centile.
<cries>

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Julie G
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Julie G » Sun Mar 22, 2015 4:43 pm

Stavia, were you able to check apoA1? It's my understanding that the ratio between the two is most predictive of future events.

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Stavia
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Stavia » Sun Mar 22, 2015 4:55 pm

nope. not available. but I think I should chill cos I believe I'm really not at high risk of CVD.

I found this: It appears apoB isn't that simple:
Am J Cardiol. 2012 Nov 15;110(10):1468-76. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.07.007. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Meta-analysis of comparison of effectiveness of lowering apolipoprotein B versus low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and nonhigh-density lipoprotein cholesterol for cardiovascular risk reduction in randomized trials.

Robinson JG1, Wang S, Jacobson TA.

Abstract

This study evaluated the relation between apolipoprotein B (apoB) decrease and coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease risk. Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis was used to evaluate the association of mean absolute apoB decrease (milligrams per deciliter) with relative risk of coronary heart disease (nonfatal myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease death), stroke (nonfatal stroke and fatal stroke), or cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, stroke, and coronary revascularization). Analysis included 25 trials (n = 131,134): 12 on statin, 4 on fibrate, 5 on niacin, 2 on simvastatin-ezetimibe, 1 on ileal bypass surgery, and 1 on aggressive versus standard low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and blood pressure targets. Combining the 25 trials, each 10-mg/dl decrease in apoB was associated with a 9% decrease in coronary heart disease, no decrease in stroke, and a 6% decrease in major cardiovascular disease risk. Non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol decrease modestly outperformed apoB decrease for prediction of coronary heart disease (Bayes factor [BF] 1.45) and cardiovascular disease (BF 2.07) risk decrease; apoB decrease added to non-HDL cholesterol plus LDL cholesterol decrease slightly improved cardiovascular disease risk prediction (1.13) but did not improve coronary heart disease risk prediction (BF 1.03) and worsened stroke risk prediction (BF 0.83). In the 12 statin trials, apoB and non-HDL cholesterol decreases similarly predicted cardiovascular disease risk; apoB improved coronary heart disease prediction when added to non-HDL cholesterol/LDL cholesterol decrease (BF 3.33) but did not improve stroke risk prediction when added to non-HDL cholesterol/LDL cholesterol decrease (BF 1.06). In conclusion, across all drug classes, apoB decreases did not consistently improve risk prediction over LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol decreases. For statins, apoB decreases added information to LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol decreases for predicting coronary heart disease but not stroke or overall cardiovascular disease risk decrease.

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Julie G
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Julie G » Sun Mar 22, 2015 5:13 pm

Another potential problem with pharmacology for our population is the possible negative effect it could have on HDL-P/ApoA1- the closest thing we have to a natural small molecule corrector. Interfering with ApoA-1 at the intestinal level could have other negative effects.

Will Lipidation of ApoA1 through Interaction with ABCA1 at the Intestinal Level Affect the Protective Functions of HDL?
http://www.mdpi.com/2079-7737/4/1/17/htm

In recent years, several HDL-C-raising or HDL-mimicking interventions have failed in outcomes studies [5]; in most cases, patients were optimally treated with statins (i.e., ACS patients) [5,6,7,8,9,10,11]. This series of studies with negative findings of compounds with unrelated mechanisms of action is unlikely to be due to chance and challenges the “HDL hypothesis” [12]. The background treatments that are now standard of care may be a confounding factor since in the case of niacin, some benefit in reduction of non-fatal myocardial infarction was observed; however, this was not reproduced in recent studies in patients optimally treated with statins [13].

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Ski
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Ski » Mon Mar 23, 2015 9:08 am

Stavia wrote:ok have my apoliprotein b back.
its 107.
65th centile.
<cries>

There are enough people that have high lipid values with no evidence of heart disease, so I wouldn't worry. With so many cases like this, Im pretty disillusioned with the whole cholesterol theory to be honest.

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Julie G
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Julie G » Mon Mar 23, 2015 4:07 pm

I fully agree with Ski. I think we still have a lot to learn about CAD/CVD- especially for our genotype.

Based upon what we DO know (per peer-reviewed literature,) I greatly respect Dr. Dayspring for fully acknowledging the risk posed by elevated LDL-P/apoB. Poking around Lecturepad, however, has taught me the importance of looking at the FULL clinical picture. Yes, elevated LDL-P/apoB is a risk factor ESPECIALLY when combined with MetS, high inflammation, high Lp(a), low Omega 3 index, low functional HDL, sedentary lifestyle, high BMI, high BP, etc.

IMHO, we need to focus on reducing as many of those risk factors as possible- including LDL-P/apoB. To overly focus on one slightly elevated biomarker might be missing the BIG picture.

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Stavia
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Stavia » Tue Apr 07, 2015 11:05 pm

Edit..
Duplicate post
Last edited by Stavia on Wed Apr 08, 2015 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Stavia
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Stavia » Tue Apr 07, 2015 11:08 pm

ok, managed to get an apolipoprotein A1 at a little hospital lab down south. Took two weeks. I used my cunning ingenuity to hatch a plan. So cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a weasel. *

Its 175 (0-200)
My apolipoprotein b is 107 (49 to 103)

This gives me a ratio of 0.61. <--------don't understand
Is this ok?

All I could find was
http://www.oaml.com/.../OAML%20Guidelin ... 20Lipid%20
edit: but then I found this....http://www.cardiolipid.com/cardiolipid% ... 012001.pdf
It looks like 0.6 is the transition from low to medium risk in women. Am I correct?



*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gp5St7hORyw

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SusanJ
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby SusanJ » Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:53 am

The lab I use (Health Diagnostic Laboratory) also reports that results <.6 are good.

Can't add much more since I don't really understand this ratio at all...

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Julie G
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Re: Need input into my lipids please

Postby Julie G » Wed Apr 08, 2015 12:14 pm

The apoB/ApoA1 ratio is an effective predictor of CAD risk. Your numbers are good, Stavia. Here's more reassurance.
apob-apo-a1-ratio.jpg
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