fo ti - polygonum multiflorum - He Shou Wu

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
sarahb12
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 122
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:21 pm
Location: Boise, id

fo ti - polygonum multiflorum - He Shou Wu

Postby sarahb12 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 10:50 pm

This plant supplement looks interesting:
http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/16706113 - increases BDNF in hippocampus when Abeyta downregulates (wonder if it always increases BDNF?) I have one copy of the variant that doesn't increase BDNF with exercise.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12856856 - improved learning in aged mice.

http://www.pubfacts.com/detail/12775116 ... ampus-morp
E3/E4

rep
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 310
Joined: Tue Oct 14, 2014 1:33 am

Re: fo ti - polygonum multiflorum - He Shou Wu

Postby rep » Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:11 am

I have one copy of the variant that doesn't increase BDNF with exercise.


Is there an SNP we can look up on Promethease for this? What would we look for?

sarahb12
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 122
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:21 pm
Location: Boise, id

Re: fo ti - polygonum multiflorum - He Shou Wu

Postby sarahb12 » Wed Feb 18, 2015 7:09 pm

SusanJ wrote up a super good informational page here: https://www.apoe4.info/wiki/index.php?title=BDNF
E3/E4

marp
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2014 10:22 am

Re: fo ti - polygonum multiflorum - He Shou Wu

Postby marp » Thu Feb 19, 2015 1:08 am

From this recent paper, Sept 2014, n=237
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/ ... 00236/full

This is an interesting conclusion in regards to BDNF, (rs6265)

"Third, the other polymorphism (BDNF) was not statisti- cally associated with the targeted outcomes. In general, BDNF- cognition associations are inconsistently observed and difficult to interpret (Mandelman and Grigorenko, 2012). In addition, BDNF associations are rarely tested as predictors of clinical or cognitive status or neurodegenerative changes (cf. Forlenza et al., 2010). The mechanisms through which BDNF may affect neurocogni- tive performance are proposed (Savitz et al., 2006; Harris and Deary, 2011) but their relevance to non-normal cognitive status has not been firmly established. As an MCI predictor, BDNF may be less relevant for early classification (as in this study) than for later cognitive impairment (Forlenza et al., 2010). We included BDNF for two reasons: (a) it could have been related to objective cognitive status as we assess it (via performance on a reference battery including memory and speed markers) and (b) it could have appeared as an associate of cognitive status in the role of interacting influence."


Return to “Prevention and Treatment”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: alysson and 11 guests