Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

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circular
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Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby circular » Thu Oct 09, 2014 10:39 pm

It's probably too early to recommend a specific probiotic for specific brain effects (fermented foods may be the best option), but I found this article interesting:

"Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds"

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/11 ... -our-minds
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Welcomeaboard » Fri Oct 10, 2014 6:40 am

The easiest way to explain this is, yep.

The Maharishi Welcome Aboard Yogi

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Teezer
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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Teezer » Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:45 am

We're just renting the penthouse. Management is in the basement.
It's weird how I'm constantly surprised by the passage of time when it's literally the most predictable thing in the universe. -- xkcd

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Julie G
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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Julie G » Fri Oct 10, 2014 11:05 am

Love that, Teezer- literally LOL :lol:

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Stavia » Fri Oct 10, 2014 11:30 am

Teezer wrote:We're just renting the penthouse. Management is in the basement.

Woke up to this. Setting the tone for my day. Fabulous!!!!
(Trying to stifle giggles in the bed so as not to wake hubby)

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby SusanJ » Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:12 pm

Just came out of the BDNF rabbit hole. And then I see Teezer's comment. :lol:

The connection to BDNF is an interesting one. BDNF supports the survival of neurons and the growth of new ones (see wikipedia).

From a Framingham study: Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and the Risk for Dementia
"During follow-up, 140 participants developed dementia, 117 of whom had AD. Controlling for age and sex, each standard-deviation increment in BDNF was associated with a 33% lower risk for dementia and AD (P = .006 and P = .01, respectively) and these associations persisted after additional adjustments. Compared with the bottom quintile, BDNF levels in the top quintile were associated with less than half the risk for dementia and AD (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95%CI, 0.28–0.85; P = .01; and hazard ratio, 0.46; 95%CI, 0.24–0.86; P = .02, respectively)...Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genetic variants were not associated with AD risk."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4056186/

"By stimulating glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis BDNF bolsters cellular bioenergetics and protects neurons against injury and disease. By acting in the brain and periphery, BDNF increases insulin sensitivity and parasympathetic tone. Genetic factors, a 'couch potato' lifestyle, and chronic stress impair BDNF signaling, and this may contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Novel BDNF-focused interventions are being developed for obesity, diabetes, and neurological disorders."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361004


Increasing BDNF can ameliorate amyloid β-induced neuronal damage (in our mouse friends):
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24713151


And for my gal pals out there: "We found that progesterone does indeed elicit an increase in both BDNF protein and mRNA levels in the cerebral cortex."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2693123/

I know some of you can't use progesterone, but don't despair. From wikipedia: "Similar to exercise, both intermittent fasting and calorie restriction induce the production of brain derived neurotrophic factor, which in turn is associated with neurogenesis in the hippocampus."


The last thing I looked at this morning has to do with effects of diet (small study on healthy men):
"Plasma BDNF decreased also by 27.8% in 6 h after a high-fat meal." (They used Calogen as a meal replacer. Doesn't mention if this was iso-caloric.)
And of course we know high sugar/insulin is never good: "Our results demonstrate for the first time that 6 h of intralipid/heparin infusion during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp significantly decreased by 43% serum BDNF and by 35% plasma BDNF level."
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/35/2/358.full

This high fat effect seems to contra-indicate a high-fat diet...JG, any ideas to explain this? Is overcoming dysfunctional glucose metabolism more important than the decrease in BDNF we might get from a high fat diet?


Anyway, it appears whatever we can do to increase BDNF is a good thing and our little gut friends are just another option. 8-)


Anyway, I know we have BDNF stuff scattered everywhere. I'll stuff it all together in a post, and someday a wiki.

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Welcomeaboard » Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:47 pm

That dang turmeric appears to raise BDNF as well as DHA raising BDNF, oh well.

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Julie G
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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby Julie G » Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:14 pm

Susan, Nice research on BDNF. You resurfaced from your rabbit hole to send me down another :D I had to define a half dozen terms before I could grasp that paper- ouch.

On the surface, the diet study seems to indicate that higher fat decreases BDNF, but does it really? As per usual, it's all about context. In the study you cited, 900 calories of Calogen formula was infused into study participants in ONE hour; inducing an extreme HYPER-caloric effect. So yeah, when an abundance of calories is consumed, BDNF decreases. Not too surprising- kind of like inducing that couch potato effect.

Neurologists, like Bredesen/Perlmutter, are using a high fat diet quite differently. Their intention is to create a neuroprotective ketotic effect by reducing carbs while simultaneously practicing CR and regular exercise. Ketones are created by a HYPO-caloric effect; the opposite of your cited paper.

It's worth noting that Calogen is 96% fat/4% sugar. It is composed of engineered, primarily Omega-6 oils- canola and sunflower- highly inflammatory. We know that other free fatty acids, namely Omega-3s, have been demonstrated to Increase BDNF leading me to wonder if the composition, as well as the quantity, of the formula contributed to the negative effect.

We clearly need more research here, but I'm fairly certain that the context in which the higher fat is consumed will affect the BDNF levels.

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby SusanJ » Fri Oct 10, 2014 4:26 pm

I'll go with the hypercaloric theory. When I have more time, I'll poke around some more and dump all the BDNF references in one place.

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Re: Gut microorganisms and the brain ...

Postby circular » Fri Oct 10, 2014 6:34 pm

SussnJ thank you, that would be really helpful. I have wonky heterozygous BDNF gene too, and I'm one of the one who can't use progesterone, although Juliegee says I may be able to after a while and I will try.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.


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