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thjj
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby thjj » Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:04 am

TheBrain wrote:


I’ve never felt the increased energy and improved cognition from being on a ketogenic diet that others report, but this diet has healed my hypoglycemia/insulin resistance.
Me too! ...And those were the main reasons why I went on the keto diet: for the increase in energy & cognition, but no magic outcome for me. Also surprisingly, my glucose pretty much stayed the same despite eating no added sugars during my deep ketosis (glucose avg~80), but what I really liked was the noticeable significant reduction in inflammation & bloating.
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby TheBrain » Wed Sep 04, 2019 7:25 am

thjj wrote:
TheBrain wrote:I’ve never felt the increased energy and improved cognition from being on a ketogenic diet that others report, but this diet has healed my hypoglycemia/insulin resistance.
Me too! ...And those were the main reasons why I went on the keto diet: for the increase in energy & cognition, but no magic outcome for me. Also surprisingly, my glucose pretty much stayed the same despite eating no added sugars during my deep ketosis (glucose avg~80), but what I really liked was the noticeable significant reduction in inflammation & bloating.


I’m sorry to hear this! It’s a bummer, isn’t it? But it’s great that you noted significant reduction of inflammation and bloating. Are you off the ketogenic diet now? Your use of the past tense suggests so. I’m still on it, but I need to better feed my gut microbiome, so I periodically consider going off it and eating more carbs. But I’d only continue doing that if insulin resistance doesn’t return.
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby CarrieS » Wed Sep 04, 2019 8:32 am

TheBrain wrote:I’m sorry to hear this! It’s a bummer, isn’t it? But it’s great that you noted significant reduction of inflammation and bloating. Are you off the ketogenic diet now? Your use of the past tense suggests so. I’m still on it, but I need to better feed my gut microbiome, so I periodically consider going off it and eating more carbs. But I’d only continue doing that if insulin resistance doesn’t return.

Brain! I love that you are thinking about feeding your gut microbiome. It's my favorite topic! The good bacteria need to eat fiber and resistant starch to survive and benefit our bodies. When you are ready, consider slowly adding in resistant starches such as whole grains and legumes working up to 20 grams or more a day. You may experience gas and bloating if your body hasn't had these foods in a while. When we take foods out of our diet for a long period of time, we lose the microbes responsible for digesting them so we have to build up the microbe population again by eating that food. It may be necessary to eliminate certain foods to heal so it's still important to do that step first. I've been working on adding back in small amounts (a spoonful or two typical for me) of beans, grains and starchy vegetables after years of eliminating them. My last stool test (Viome) showed a significant increase in the good bacteria and the short chain fatty acids (acetate, butyrate, propionate). I still concentrate on a wide range of vegetables, nuts and seeds first for a variety fiber.
This article by Dr. Alan Christianson has a list of resistant starches.
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby TheresaB » Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:11 am

Jan18 wrote:I can get blown with the wind and since I just read on Pritikin's site that ALL fat, including olive oil's monosaturated fat, was bad for the heart and arteries, it threw me.

Do you eat eggs? Gundry says they are good, still so much popular literature makes them out to be bad here in the States. I eat 1-2 a day. But 2 only have 3.3 g of saturated fat.

I am going to have to tweak my diet even more and retest my blood maybe in 1- 3 months. I can't wait 6. I need to see if I'm progressing on the right path and need more frequent positive reinforcement. Once I know that, I can spread out the tests more. More olive oil on vegetables (now I'm scared that the olive oil I have isn't the "good" olive oil Gundry says most aren't -- can you please speak to his olive oil ad? And how do we even find one with the requirements he says they need: Raised, harvested and produced by ONE farm?) I get myself crazed that I'm doing more harm (as he says I might be) than good!!!


I haven't read Pritikin, but from my research fat, as long as it's the good stuff, is good for you. So much of our body, especially the brain (of interest to us ApoE4s) needs/is made up of fat. If you happen to buy "Eat Rich, Live Long" they talk about the myth of fat being bad for the heart and arteries and that insulin resistance (there's that term again) is actually what drives sdLDL/oxLDL and the primary factor in heart disease.

I do eat eggs, but per Dr Gundry, only Omega-3 or pastured eggs, otherwise you're getting a pass down from the chickens being fed chicken feed which often consists of grains, corn, soybeans. I keep my intake to a level where I maintain my allowed animal protein intake per Dr Gundry, but whites contain the majority of the protein, so 2 to 2.5 eggs (with the half being a yolk) a day should be fine.

Regarding olive oil, they are not all equal. Dr Gundry always told us we wanted an olive oil with a "bite" or as Max Lugavere in his book "Genius Foods" refers to it as a spicy feeling in the back of your throat. That comes from a polyphenol called Oleocanthal, it's anti-inflammatory (inflammation negates neuroplasticity) and may help the brain clear amyloid plaque.

I've heard from sources, other than Dr Gundry's internet ads which I mostly ignore, that the olive trees from Morocco do produce the best olive oil for oleocanthal, but by no means does this mean all other olive oils are crap. Just because you can't afford a Rolls Royce doesn't mean your Chevy can't get you to where you need to go. If you can afford a Lexus, all the better, but don't go with a Yugo. There are olive oils out there that have been cut with vegetable oil, they're cheaper as a result, but vegetable oils are inflammatory, you want to avoid them.

At a minimum I recommend a quality (100% olive oil) EVOO - Extra Virgin Olive oil. I personally go for the organic, unfiltered, cold pressed EVOO because the unfiltered means it has particles that bind to oxidized cholesterol. Don't worry, they're invisible and there are no particles to the texture of the oil. When I first heard of the particles in unfiltered EVOO I thought, EWWWW, but it looks and has the consistency of "normal" oil.

You want fresh olive oil, that is within the year following when it was pressed. Labels typically have a two year expiration date (2 years after pressing), subtract one year and go with that.

Olive oil is mostly monounsaturated fat, that's good. As a fat, it can help quell hunger and doesn't spike insulin. In fact olive oil can help with insulin resistance. Here are 3 studies I found with a quick internet search, I'm sure there are more and better studies out there:
Extra Virgin Olive Oil on Glycemic Control ,Insulin Resistance and Insulin Secretion
Polyphenol-rich virgin olive oil reduces insulin resistance and liver inflammation and improves mitochondrial dysfunction in high-fat diet fed rats
Polyphenol-rich virgin olive oil reduces insulin resistance and liver inflammation and improves mitochondrial dysfunction in high-fat diet fed rats

A 20 hour fast, wow! That's great, keep up your good work. I'm impressed that despite having your head turned every which way regarding dietary recommendations, you are headstrong in wanting to make the right decisions. Keep plugging, keep researching.
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby WhatNext » Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:26 pm

Ugh, Gundry. I lost respect for him when I stumbled on his internet ad for a skin-care product. Yes, he has a line of skin care products: Gundry MD. So he's also a dermatologist? The ad was for his age-spot remover. I read the reviews on Amazon, which were terrible. I can't find it there now; maybe he's not selling it on Amazon anymore. A 1-ounce bottle cost something like $120. It made me think Gundry was trying to cash in on his reputation in any way he could by coming up with a product that would appeal to a massive audience--who doesn't want to get rid of age spots?

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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby TheBrain » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:12 pm

Jan18 wrote:That's very interesting information, and speaks to the fact that our bodies are indeed functioning in different ways, so we must not assume the "one size fits all."

Thanks for sharing that and I wish you success with the L-carnitine supplementation!


Thanks, Jan18! Good luck with lowering your fasting insulin. Please report back with your progress. We're all rooting for you.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby TheBrain » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:26 pm

CarrieS wrote:
TheBrain wrote:I’m sorry to hear this! It’s a bummer, isn’t it? But it’s great that you noted significant reduction of inflammation and bloating. Are you off the ketogenic diet now? Your use of the past tense suggests so. I’m still on it, but I need to better feed my gut microbiome, so I periodically consider going off it and eating more carbs. But I’d only continue doing that if insulin resistance doesn’t return.


Brain! I love that you are thinking about feeding your gut microbiome. It's my favorite topic! The good bacteria need to eat fiber and resistant starch to survive and benefit our bodies. When you are ready, consider slowly adding in resistant starches such as whole grains and legumes working up to 20 grams or more a day. You may experience gas and bloating if your body hasn't had these foods in a while. When we take foods out of our diet for a long period of time, we lose the microbes responsible for digesting them so we have to build up the microbe population again by eating that food. It may be necessary to eliminate certain foods to heal so it's still important to do that step first. I've been working on adding back in small amounts (a spoonful or two typical for me) of beans, grains and starchy vegetables after years of eliminating them. My last stool test (Viome) showed a significant increase in the good bacteria and the short chain fatty acids (acetate, butyrate, propionate). I still concentrate on a wide range of vegetables, nuts and seeds first for a variety fiber.

This article by Dr. Alan Christianson has a list of resistant starches.


Hi Carrie!

It's encouraging to know your Viome test showed a significant increase in good bacteria and short chain fatty acids, proving your efforts to feed your gut microbiome are working. That gives me hope. I've been thinking a fecal microbiota transplant might be in my future, but I'd prefer avoiding that.

I've had gut issues a long, long time. This year, I was treated for hydrogen sulfide SIBO (it helps to finally have a correct diagnosis). I'm currently under treatment for candida and Clostridium overgrowths. I have many food sensitivities, so my diet has been quite restricted for a while. Recently, I experimented with sweet potato (cooked, then cooled to create resistant starch) and was happy that I could consume 1/2+ cup of sweet potato without a glucose spike!

I like your suggestion to go with very small amounts of new foods. I feel like trying lentils next.
ApoE 4/4 - When I was in 7th grade, my fellow students in history class called me "The Brain" because I had such a memory for detail. I excelled at memorization and aced tests. This childhood memory helps me cope!

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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby Plumster » Wed Sep 04, 2019 7:58 pm

I'm glad you mention the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine -- they are great and do address AD and diet a little bit.
https://www.pcrm.org/health-topics/alzheimers
A podcast from Sep 3, 2019:
https://www.pcrm.org/news/exam-room-pod ... your-brain

I'd also recommend Michael Greger's new book How Not to Diet, which will be out in December 2019.
https://nutritionfacts.org/how-not-to-diet/
Or you can just watch his videos on Nutritionfacts and search for AD.
Or Gundry: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gun ... -is-wrong/
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby thjj » Thu Sep 05, 2019 11:15 pm

TheBrain wrote:I’m sorry to hear this! It’s a bummer, isn’t it? But it’s great that you noted significant reduction of inflammation and bloating. Are you off the ketogenic diet now? Your use of the past tense suggests so. I’m still on it, but I need to better feed my gut microbiome, so I periodically consider going off it and eating more carbs. But I’d only continue doing that if insulin resistance doesn’t return.
Yes, still doing the keto―Sorry, I think the past tense is bc I was talking about when I was in deep ketosis. I'm currently doing mild ketosis. The last I checked was more than a month ago (1 mmol) but I only have 2 strips left so I'm using them sparingly for now. Interestingly, I had a keto rash flare-up a few days ago! I notice that I get them about 2 times a month. & I'm not sure but I think I get them when I eat a higher amount of fat. I'm gonna keep an eye on it. I also think I feel more itching after I eat fat-enriched foods like an avocado. This is interesting, I really enjoy doing N=1 on myself :)

I'm continuing the keto, despite the mentioned bummer results. Another benefit: I used to get throbbing headaches frequently, which means I take a lot less ibuprofen, which means my blood pressure is back to normal.
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Re: Gundry internet ads

Postby Ski » Fri Sep 06, 2019 8:02 am

WhatNext wrote:Ugh, Gundry. I lost respect for him when I stumbled on his internet ad for a skin-care product. Yes, he has a line of skin care products: Gundry MD. So he's also a dermatologist? The ad was for his age-spot remover. I read the reviews on Amazon, which were terrible. I can't find it there now; maybe he's not selling it on Amazon anymore. A 1-ounce bottle cost something like $120. It made me think Gundry was trying to cash in on his reputation in any way he could by coming up with a product that would appeal to a massive audience--who doesn't want to get rid of age spots?
WhatNext


Never been a fan of his even though I adopt some of his dietary advice into my own regime. However, whether its him or any practitioner, if they have you on a regime that improves your health, then who am I to argue. I just dont like the sweeping health claims/causes he makes based on associations without hard evidence.

I watched an excellent video at the IFM conference, where he was on stage with respected practitioners Terry Wahls and Alessio Fasano with regards to diet and its relation to Autoimmunity. Id say that they both agreed very little with Gundrys claims (mainly lectin issue) and pointed out the lack of controlled studies. It was a great video that had many good nuggets on general dietary advice and a moment where Gundry's association was explicitly called out by Fasano. Fasano said in areas of Sardinia where the people live some of the longest, they eat Legumes and Gundry said "yes, but they also have the highest levels of autoimmunity in Europe" (association), and then Fasano said "thats because of their inbreeding amongst each other"(genetics). Huge laughter by the audience! So yeah, I take his claims with a grain of salt.


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