VieLight

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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ru442
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VieLight

Postby ru442 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:16 am

My FMP sent me an email last night, I've not researched in depth but seems promising. She has one in office and has offered for us patients to try it:

https://vielight.com/
Male 4/4 56 yrs., "Live, Laugh, Love"

ayyong
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Re: VieLight

Postby ayyong » Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:16 am

It looks promising. We are using the 810 and 633, but are considering adding the Neuro gamma.

Some new trial results for the Neuro gamma:

https://vielight.com/wp-content/uploads ... -07-18.pdf

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Re: VieLight

Postby apod » Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:11 pm

I must admit, these devices look less than legit. I love the proud photo of the businessman driving his car with a lightbulb clipped inside his nose. I'd love to learn more about this stuff -- I guess it's more potent than simply going out in the sun? I've heard a bunch of podcast ads for the joovv.

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Re: VieLight

Postby swampf0etus » Tue Oct 16, 2018 4:45 am

I recommend you steer clear of this product as it makes fake health claims. Please don't fall for it. Read about it here: http://earlightswindle.com/gloom/2018/0 ... ough-fake/

That website is devoted to preventing people from being swindled by 'ear light' health claims.

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Re: VieLight

Postby srbogert » Tue Oct 16, 2018 1:54 pm

Hello ayyong,
Welcome to the APOE-4.info site, and thanks for participating. I want to share a couple of resources that people find useful when they are new to the site. 1) The APOE4 Primer. This is an evidence based summary about APOE4 and what people can do as they begin their journey of preventing / reversing cognitive decline. 2) The How-To Guide. This gives you tops for navigating the web site, posting, searching, and so forth.

As you continue to use the site, you will notice that the community tends to be biased toward evidence based, proven solutions. When something is experimental, or controversial, we try to be very clear about identifying it as such. Our goal is to make sure that our readers are getting trustworthy information.

Devices like the VieLight appear to fall into the experimental category. Yes, some research is being done, but it is a long ways from conclusive. Even if the device does someday prove helpful, I think that it it should be presented as a part of a comprehensive treatment plan including both medical and lifestyle elements. The VueLight website just seems interested in selling devices. That's a red flag for me.
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ayyong
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Re: VieLight

Postby ayyong » Tue Oct 16, 2018 7:42 pm

Yes, the device was suggested to us by a Bredesen-trained physician as one element in a complete reCODE treatment plan that we have been following for 6 months.

The devices are still experimental and studies are mostly ongoing: so far, apart from the link I posted above, the only case report (by the developers) is this one:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5568598/

I am as sceptical as anyone else when it comes to spending this sort of money, and am not making any sort of recommendation, but there does appear to be some theoretical basis underlying it:

https://alzres.biomedcentral.com/articl ... 6/alzrt232

circular
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Re: VieLight

Postby circular » Wed Oct 17, 2018 3:17 pm

ayyong wrote:Yes, the device was suggested to us by a Bredesen-trained physician as one element in a complete reCODE treatment plan that we have been following for 6 months.

The devices are still experimental and studies are mostly ongoing: so far, apart from the link I posted above, the only case report (by the developers) is this one:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5568598/

I am as sceptical as anyone else when it comes to spending this sort of money, and am not making any sort of recommendation, but there does appear to be some theoretical basis underlying it:

https://alzres.biomedcentral.com/articl ... 6/alzrt232

Thanks for posting the links. I've been looking into using a near infrared sauna for my general health. There are some online, for example a little hut you can set up in your home and a gizmo you can hang on a bathroom door, that are really expensive. And then there are various way cheaper DIY rigs. I'm such a mechanical dunce I plan to have a handier person make my a cheap rig. I think this may provide the wider benefits from sauna use generally, but I didn't realize it may also favorably influence AD pathology -- key word 'may' given the study was done on mice using a different technique. It would be helpful if they would just study near infrared sauna use so people don't have to buy a special device limited to a specific application. I guess if a NIR sauna study worked out through peer review, then the Joe and Jane Schomoes would need to spend a lot to ensure they use the exact same NIR sauna specifications as in the hypothetical studies.
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

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Re: VieLight

Postby bladedmind » Sun Feb 24, 2019 3:29 pm

swampf0etus wrote:I recommend you steer clear of this product as it makes fake health claims. Please don't fall for it. Read about it here: http://earlightswindle.com/gloom/2018/0 ... ough-fake/

That website is devoted to preventing people from being swindled by 'ear light' health claims.


I don't have any skin in this game - don't financially benefit or even advocate - but the "swindle" Finnish ear light is a white-light bud. The Vielight and its ilk are entirely different: LLLT - low level light therapy - near-infrared light at two particular frequencies - with speculative basic and medical research support and many devotees who subjectively claim benefits. It's discussed quite a bit at the longecity site as the TULIP protocol. There is a $80 DIY method of LLLT that can be found here: http://www.lostfalco.com/low-level-laser-therapy/ That site would be a walk on the wild side for some. Not endorsing it, just providing information.

The far-infrared sauna is different. It's probably good for your health and may be good for Alzheimer's. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/21/well ... brain.html Anyway, it feels good. You can buy a beautiful wooden snap-together infrared sauna for $1000, postage included from Canada. I like mine, but again am not pushing any health claims.

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Re: VieLight

Postby swampf0etus » Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:44 am

I recommend you read the Device Watch (a Quackwatch subsidiary site) report on LLLT here: https://www.devicewatch.org/reports/lllt.shtml and the Science Based Medicine article here: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/lower- ... in-action/

As to "far-infrared sauna", your reference is to an article on saunas, not far-infrared saunas. Some small studies on infrared saunas have found some small benefits, probably placebo effect. If you're willing to spend the money, they won't harm you but you may not feel any benefit. https://www.mayoclinic.org/infrared-sau ... q-20057954

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Re: VieLight

Postby Tincup » Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:46 am

circular wrote:Thanks for posting the links. I've been looking into using a near infrared sauna for my general health. There are some online, for example a little hut you can set up in your home and a gizmo you can hang on a bathroom door, that are really expensive. And then there are various way cheaper DIY rigs. I'm such a mechanical dunce I plan to have a handier person make my a cheap rig. I think this may provide the wider benefits from sauna use generally, but I didn't realize it may also favorably influence AD pathology -- key word 'may' given the study was done on mice using a different technique. It would be helpful if they would just study near infrared sauna use so people don't have to buy a special device limited to a specific application. I guess if a NIR sauna study worked out through peer review, then the Joe and Jane Schomoes would need to spend a lot to ensure they use the exact same NIR sauna specifications as in the hypothetical studies.


My take on near infrared vs traditional heat Finnish saunas was to measure my core temp increase. I have access to a traditional sauna at a rec center. I measured my temp with an oral mercury thermometer before and after a 30 minutes session. I constructed a heat lamp sauna in an unused shower, I described it here.. It uses four 250 Watt heat lamps and cost me around $150. I did the same test before/after using my heat lamp sauna. As I recall (I'm traveling and don't have access to my notes), my temp after the heat lamps went up 2 degrees vs 1 degree at the rec center. I do use opaque eye covers when I use my sauna. I've measured EMF on mine and it is very low: RF, LF Gauss (magnetic), LF Electric fields. I normally sweat profusely during my sessions and follow with a 20 minute soak in cold water (tap water temp - 45 deg F now, as high as 67 deg F in the summer).
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